Current Tornado News and Events

Current Tornado News and Events, Tornado News Articles.
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Outside Oz, GLINDA reports on tornado acoustics
During tornado formation, sound waves are produced at very low frequencies. And if your name is GLINDA, you do not need to be in Oz to hear them. Brandon White, at Oklahoma State University, is part of an engineering team that developed the Ground-based Local Infrasound Data Acquisition (GLINDA) system for the acoustic measurement of weather phenomena. He will discuss its design and capabilities at the 179th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America. (2020-12-07)

Flow physics could help forecasters predict extreme events
Researchers are studying a tornado's song and other 'doors to danger' in an increasingly chaotic world. (2020-11-23)

Predicting tornadoes on UK cold fronts for the first time
Weather forecasters can more accurately predict when a tornado is likely to hit the UK thanks to a new tool devised in a partnership between the University of Leeds and the Met Office. (2020-10-20)

Are climate scientists being too cautious when linking extreme weather to climate change?
Climate science has focused on avoiding false alarms when linking extreme events to climate change. But it could learn from how weather forecasters warn the public of hazardous events to include a second key metric: the probability of detection. (2020-10-16)

5G wireless may lead to inaccurate weather forecasts
Upcoming 5G wireless networks that will provide faster cell phone service may lead to inaccurate weather forecasts, according to a Rutgers study on a controversial issue that has created anxiety among meteorologists. (2020-09-24)

Amateur drone videos could aid in natural disaster damage assessment
It wasn't long after Hurricane Laura hit the Gulf Coast Thursday that people began flying drones to record the damage and posting videos on social media. Those videos are a precious resource, say researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, who are working on ways to use them for rapid damage assessment. By using artificial intelligence, the researchers are developing a system that can automatically identify buildings and make an initial determination of whether they are damaged and how serious that damage might be. (2020-08-28)

Natural disasters must be unusual or deadly to prompt local climate policy change
Natural disasters alone are not enough to motivate local communities to engage in climate change mitigation or adaptation, a new study from Oregon State University found. Rather, policy change in response to extreme weather events appears to depend on a combination of factors, including fatalities, sustained media coverage, the unusualness of the event and the political makeup of the community. (2020-08-28)

UMD researchers identify structure of blue whirls
'Blue whirls' -- small, spinning blue flames that produce almost no soot when they burn -- have attracted great interest since their discovery in 2016, in part because they represent a potential new avenue for low-emission combustion. Now, a team of researchers has identified how these intriguing whirls are structured. (2020-08-13)

Deterministic reversal of single magnetic vortex circulation by an electric field
Chinese researchers discover a deterministic reversal of magnetic vortex circulation in a Ni79Fe21 (NiFe) island on top of a layered-perovskite Bi2WO6 (BWO) thin film using an electric field. (2020-07-06)

Knowledge of severe storm patterns may improve tornado warnings
A radar signature may help distinguish which severe storms are likely to produce dangerous tornadoes, potentially leading to more accurate warnings, according to scientists. (2020-07-01)

Spring rains are a surprising source of pollen
Spring rains washes away some pollen, but not all. University of Iowa researchers have found tree pollen fragments can remain airborne for hours after a storm. The tiny pollen particles can exacerbate allergies because they can reach deep in the lungs. (2020-05-20)

No storm in a teacup -- it's a cyclone on a silicon chip
University of Queensland researchers have combined quantum liquids and silicon-chip technology to study turbulence for the first time, opening the door to new navigation technologies and improved understanding of the turbulent dynamics of cyclones and other extreme weather. (2019-12-19)

Conservatives more likely to support climate policy if they report harm due to extreme weather
People who identify as politically conservative are more like to support climate change mitigation policies if they have report experiencing personal harm from an extreme weather event such as a wildfire, flood or tornado, a new study indicates. (2019-11-05)

New tornado casualty analysis will improve future predictions
Tyler Fricker, visiting assistant professor in the Department of Geography at Texas A&M University, recently published research in the Annals of the Association of American Geographers that gives insights into tornado casualty rates across the United States and casualty prediction models. (2019-11-04)

Study: Many Tennesseans are misinformed about tornado protection
More people die during tornadoes in the Southeast than anywhere else in the United States. And still, a lot of people have misconceptions about their risk of being impacted by tornadoes, according to a new study published in PLOS One by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (2019-09-20)

When natural disasters strike, men and women respond differently
Women tend to take cover or prepare to evacuate sooner, but often have trouble convincing the men in their life to do so, suggests a new study exploring how gender influences disaster response. (2019-09-19)

Scientists forecasted late May tornado outbreak nearly 4 weeks in advance
A team of scientists reports that they accurately predicted the nation's extensive tornado outbreak of late May 2019 nearly 4 weeks before it began. The team's study, detailing factors that went into the forecast, was published recently in the journal, Geophysical Research Letters. (2019-09-18)

NASA examines Dorian's rainfall, temperatures along Carolina coast
As Hurricane Dorian continued to lash the coast of the Carolinas NASA's IMERG assessed the rainfall the storm generated and NASA's Aqua satellite provided a look at the temperatures of the cloud tops to assess strength. (2019-09-06)

NASA analyzed Tropical Storm Fernand's strength before landfall
NASA's Aqua satellite provided forecasters at the National Hurricane Center with infrared data and cloud top temperature information for Tropical Storm Fernand as it was making landfall in northeastern Mexico. Those temperatures indicated Fernand's rainmaking capabilities. The infrared data also showed wind shear was affecting the storm. (2019-09-04)

'Tornado Alley' twisters may be easier to predict in April than in May
Scientists may have uncovered how sea-surface temperature patterns influence the number, strength and distributions of April tornado formation in the south-central region of the United States known as 'Tornado Alley.' Their results underscore how shifting climate patterns potentially affect tornado formation within seasons, which could help reduce fatalities and (2019-08-21)

Ocean temperatures turbocharge April tornadoes over Great Plains region
Do climate shifts influence tornados over North America? New research published by IBS scientists found that Pacific and Atlantic ocean temperatures in April can influence large-scale weather patterns as well as the frequency of tornados over the Great Plains region. (2019-08-21)

Tornadoes, windstorms pave way for lasting plant invasions
When tornadoes touch down, we brace for news of property damage, injuries, and loss of life, but the high-speed wind storms wreak environmental havoc, too. They can cut through massive swaths of forest, destroying trees and wildlife habitat, and opening up opportunities for invasive species to gain ground. (2019-07-18)

Tornado fatalities continue to fall, despite population growth in Tornado Alley
The rate of tornado-related fatalities increased faster than the rate of population growth until the start of the 20th century. Around 1916, that trend started to reverse. (2019-02-21)

Forecasters may be looking in wrong place when predicting tornadoes, Ohio research shows
Weather forecasters may be looking in the wrong place when working to issue tornado warnings, new research led by Ohio University has demonstrated. (2018-12-21)

Atmospheric scientists find causes of firenado in deadly Carr Fire
Atmospheric scientist Neil Lareau at the University of Nevada, Reno has authored a paper in the scientific journal Geophysical Research Letters documenting the rare firenado, finding a number of factors that combined at just the right time and place to catalyze the deadly Carr Fire in Northern California. These observations may help forecasters and scientists identify -- and potentially warn - for future destructive fire-generated vortices. (2018-12-05)

To image leaky atmosphere, NASA rocket team heads north
Earth's atmosphere is leaking-but how does oxygen get the energy to escape to space? NASA's VISIONS-2 rocket will soon launch into the unique magnetic environment near the North Pole in pursuit of an answer. (2018-11-30)

Researchers rise to challenge of predicting hail, tornadoes three weeks in advance
A prediction lead time of about 2 to 5 weeks is sorely lacking in current forecasting capabilities for severe weather. In a new paper, Colorado State University atmospheric scientists demonstrate the ability to make skillful predictions of severe weather across the Plains and southeastern United States, including hail and tornadoes, in that coveted ''subseasonal'' time scale. To do it, they use a reliable tropical weather pattern called the Madden-Julian Oscillation, which can influence weather in distant parts of the Earth. (2018-11-28)

Study: US tornado frequency shifting eastward from Great Plains
A new study finds that over the past four decades, tornado frequency has increased over a large swath of the Midwest and Southeast and decreased in portions of the central and southern Great Plains, a region traditionally associated with Tornado Alley. (2018-10-17)

New weather model could increase tornado-warning times
Penn State researchers are the first to use data obtained from recent next-generation satellites in a numerical weather-prediction model used to provide guidance for tornadic thunderstorm forecasting. (2018-10-01)

Experiencing extreme weather is not enough to convince climate chance sceptics
Experiencing extreme weather is not enough to convince climate change sceptics than humans are damaging the environment, a new study shows. (2018-10-01)

NIST details steps to keep buildings functioning after natural hazards
After an earthquake, hurricane, tornado or other natural hazard, it's considered a win if no one gets hurt and buildings stay standing. But an even bigger victory is possible: keeping those structures operational. This outcome could become more likely with improved standards and codes for the construction of residential and commercial buildings, according to a new report recently delivered to the U.S. Congress by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). (2018-08-21)

Study finds possible connection between US tornado activity, Arctic sea ice
The effects of global climate change taking place in the Arctic may influence weather much closer to home for millions of Americans, researchers report. (2018-08-06)

Using tree-fall patterns to calculate tornado wind speed
Daniel M. Rhee, a PhD student at University of Illinois specializing in Structures in Civil Engineering, focuses his research on modeling tornadoes and near-surface wind speeds using tree-fall and damage patterns. With this method, Rhee and his research advisor, Franklin T. Lombardo, estimated the near-surface wind speeds of an actual tornado event in Naplate, IL. Rhee will present this research at the Ecological Society of America's 2018 Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA. (2018-06-22)

Decoding tornadoes' infrasound waves
Tornado-producing storms can emit infrasound more than an hour before tornadogenesis, which inspired a group of researchers to develop a long-range, passive way of listening in on storms. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Brian Elbing will present his group's work collecting infrasound measurements from tornadoes to decode information contained in waves about the formation processes and life cycle before potentially devastating storms hit. (2018-05-08)

NASA's GPM examines developing US severe weather
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite has been busy analyzing severe weather in the US. (2018-05-02)

NASA's GPM catches line of strong storms responsible for tornadoes in eastern US
On Sunday, April 15, a line of strong storms at one point stretched from the Florida Straits below the Florida Keys all the way up the East Coast and into Ohio. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the severe storms as it passed overhead. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA. (2018-04-17)

How does one prepare for adverse weather events? Depends on your past experiences
With much of the central plains and Midwest now entering peak tornado season, the impact of these potentially devastating weather events will be shaped in large part by how individuals think about and prepare for them. A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal shows that people's past experiences with tornadoes inform how they approach this type of extreme weather in the future, including their perception of the risk. (2018-04-16)

Giant solar tornadoes put researchers in a spin
Despite their appearance solar tornadoes are not rotating after all, according to a European team of scientists. A new analysis of these gigantic structures, each one several times the size of the Earth, indicates that they may have been misnamed because scientists have so far only been able to observe them using 2-dimensional images. (2018-04-05)

Researchers find pathway to give advanced notice for hailstorms
A new study identifies a method for predicting the likelihood of damaging hailstorms in the United States--up to three weeks in advance. (2018-01-30)

Personal growth often coexists with post-traumatic stress following natural disasters
The 2011 tornado in Joplin, Missouri, was one of the most destructive in US history -- killing 161 people, injuring 1,150 and destroying approximately one-third of the city's homes. Researchers from the University of Missouri have found that survivors of natural disasters have the potential to experience positive changes or growth in addition to the stress they experience. Researchers say this finding can help those working in communities after a disaster. (2018-01-10)

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