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Current Touch News and Events, Touch News Articles.
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NUS researchers gives robots intelligent sensing abilities to carry out complex tasks
The novel system developed by National University Singapore computer scientists and materials engineers combines an artificial brain system with human-like electronic skin, and vision sensors, to make robots smarter. (2020-07-15)

Designing better asteroid explorers
Recent NASA missions to asteroids have used robotic explorers to gather data about the early evolution of our Solar System, planet formation, and how life may have originated on Earth. To design successful robotic explorers, researchers must understand how these explorers impact the surface of asteroids during their touchdown. University of Rochester researchers conducted lab experiments to determine what happens when explorers and other objects touch down on complex, granular surfaces in low gravity environments. (2020-07-14)

How Venus flytraps snap
Venus flytraps catch spiders and insects by snapping their trap leaves. This mechanism is activated when unsuspecting prey touch highly sensitive trigger hairs twice within 30 seconds. A study led by researchers at the University of Zurich has now shown that a single slow touch also triggers trap closure - probably to catch slow-moving larvae and snails. (2020-07-10)

Scientists discover a new connection between the eyes and touch
Tiny eye movements can be used as an index of humans' ability to anticipate relevant information in the environment independent of the information's sensory modality. (2020-07-06)

Are you a hugger? It might be hereditary
Affection is partly genetic for women but not for men, finds a new study led by the University of Arizona. Those predisposed to being more affectionate may be struggling with 'skin hunger' amid COVID-19 physical distancing. (2020-06-23)

IU researchers grow hairy skin from human stem cells
Building on years of groundbreaking discoveries in stem cell research, scientists from Indiana University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School have determined how to grow hairy skin using human stem cells--developing one of the most complex skin models in the world. (2020-06-04)

Intent defined optical network for intelligent operation and maintenance
Traditionally, the operation and maintenance of optical networks rely on the experience of engineers to configure network parameters, involving command-line interface, middle-ware scripting, and troubleshooting. However, with the emerging of B5G/6G applications, the traditional configuration cannot meet the new requirement of real-time automatic configuration. Researchers propose an intent defined optical network (IDON) architecture toward artificial intelligence-based optical network automated operation and maintenance against service objective, by introducing a self-adapted generation and optimization (SAGO) policy. (2020-05-19)

Controlling your home by the power of thought
Neuroscientists at the German Primate Center developed a new experimental environment to study action plans during walking. (2020-05-06)

Extinguishing fearful memories depends on the flexibility of your DNA
New research from the University of Queensland shows that the ability to extinguish fearful memories relies on a change in DNA structure: from Z-DNA to B-DNA. The findings suggest that the more easily you can switch between DNA these structures, the more plastic your memory is. (2020-05-04)

Mind-controlled arm prostheses that 'feel' are now a part of everyday life
For the first time, people with arm amputations can experience sensations of touch in a mind-controlled arm prosthesis that they use in everyday life. A study in the New England Journal of Medicine reports on three Swedish patients who have lived, for several years, with this new technology -- one of the world's most integrated interfaces between human and machine. (2020-04-29)

Hugs and kisses: Research connects affection, attachment style and marriage satisfaction
Go ahead: Give your partner a hug or cuddle while you catch some Netflix. According to recently published research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, it just might build a stronger relationship. (2020-04-28)

Mobile phones found to host cocktail of live germs, aiding spread of diseases
A new study warns mobile phones could be acting as 'Trojan horses' for coronavirus and urges billions of users worldwide to decontaminate their devices daily. The research, led by Associate Professor Lotti Tajouri of Bond University, reviewed 56 studies from 24 countries and found phones host a staggering cocktail of live germs. (2020-04-28)

Researchers restore injured man's sense of touch using brain-computer interface technology
On April 23 in the journal Cell, a team of researchers report that they have been able to restore sensation to the hand of a research participant with a severe spinal cord injury using a brain-computer interface (BCI) system. The technology harnesses neural signals that are so minuscule they can't be perceived and enhances them via artificial sensory feedback sent back to the participant, resulting in greatly enriched motor function. (2020-04-23)

The future of semiconductors is clear
Mobility is a key parameter for semiconductor performance and relates to how quickly and easily electrons can move inside a substance. Researchers have achieved the highest mobility among thin films of tin dioxide ever reported. This high mobility could allow engineers to create thin and even transparent tin dioxide semiconductors for use in next-generation LED lights, photovoltaic solar panels or touch-sensitive display technologies. (2020-04-22)

Study shows European coins have antimicrobial activity in contrast to banknotes
Research due to be presented at this year's European Congress on Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) shows that European banknotes are more easily contaminated by microbes than coins. However, coins being made from antimicrobial metals such as copper does not completely stop them from being sources of contamination. (2020-04-16)

Skin that computes
As our body's largest and most prominent organ, the skin also provides one of our most fundamental connections to the world around us. From the moment we're born, it is intimately involved in every physical interaction we have. (2020-04-15)

Researchers successfully repair stroke-damaged rat brains
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have succeeded in restoring mobility and sensation of touch in stroke-afflicted rats by reprogramming human skin cells to become nerve cells, which were then transplanted into the rats' brains. The study has now been published in the research journal PNAS. (2020-04-08)

Study shows how diligent we have to be to keep surfaces germ-free
A recent study suggests that even organized efforts to clean surfaces can fall short, a reminder for us all that keeping our surroundings clean may require some additional work. (2020-03-25)

SFU research uses simulation game to alter beliefs about poverty
In advancing research to tackle the problem of burgeoning global economic inequality, researchers at Simon Fraser University used a poverty simulation game called SPENT to foster greater understanding of what causes poverty and economic inequality. (2020-03-16)

Looking outside the fiber: Researchers demonstrate new concept of optical fiber sensors
Researchers have demonstrated a new concept of optical fiber sensors that addresses a decades-long challenge: the distributed mapping of refractive index outside the cladding of standard fiber, where light does not reach. The sensor can be used for leak detection in critical infrastructure, and process monitoring in the petrochemical industry, desalination plants, food and beverage production and more. (2020-03-09)

Nanoscale spectroscopy review showcases a bright future
A new review authored by international leaders in their field, and published in Nature, focuses on the luminescent nanoparticles at the heart of many advances and the opportunities and challenges for these technologies to reach their full potential. (2020-03-04)

Regenerative nerve interface enhances precision and durability of hand prostheses
Researchers have found that a new nerve interface technology endows upper limb amputees with greater control and precision when using prosthetic hands. (2020-03-04)

The neural basis of sensory hypersensitivity
A study from MIT and Brown University reveals a neural circuit that appears to underlie sensory hypersensitivity in a mouse model of autism, offering a possible strategy for developing new treatments. (2020-03-02)

A tactile robot finger with no blind spots
Researchers at Columbia Engineering announced today that they have introduced a new type of robotic finger with a sense of touch. Their finger can localize touch with very high precision--<1mm--over a large, multicurved surface, much like its human counterpart. (2020-02-26)

McGill researchers end decade-long search for mechanical pain sensor
Researchers at McGill University have discovered that a protein found in the membrane of our sensory neurons are involved in our capacity to feel mechanical pain, laying the foundation for the development of powerful new analgesic drugs. (2020-02-24)

Bumblebees recognize objects through sight and touch, a complex cognitive feat
Demonstrating an unprecedented degree of cognitive complexity in an insect, researchers report that bumblebees are capable of recognizing objects across senses. (2020-02-20)

Highly sensitive sensors show promise in enhancing human touch
People rely on a highly tuned sense of touch to manipulate objects, but injuries to the skin and the simple act of wearing gloves can impair this ability. In this week's Applied Physics Reviews, scientists report the development of a new tactile-enhancement system based on a highly sensitive sensor. The sensor has remarkable sensitivity, allowing the wearer to detect the light brush of a feather. This crack-based sensor was inspired by a spider's slit organ. (2020-02-18)

Tumor of the touch cells: A first-of-its-kind study in India
A team of researchers from the National Centre for Biological Sciences, Bangalore, a pathologist at the Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai and scientists at ACTREC, Navi Mumbai, joined hands to study the basis of a skin cancer known as Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Their work, published in the journal of Microbial Pathogenesis is a first-of-its-kind study in the Indian population. (2020-02-17)

Gentle touch loses its pleasure in migraine patients
Psychophysical data suggest that migraine patients may have abnormal affective aspects of sensorial functioning, by showing reduced sensation of pleasure associated with touch. (2020-02-13)

Direct touch of food makes eating experience more enjoyable
When high self-control individuals touch food directly with their hands (vs. indirectly with a utensil), they not only experience it as tastier and more satisfying, but they eat more of it. The work, published in the Dec. 19, 2020 issue of the Journal of Retailing, may not only offer a way to increase the appeal of food but also offers retailers a simple way to make the eating experience more enjoyable for consumers sampling food. (2020-02-05)

New knowledge on how different brain cell types contribute to our movements
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have mapped how different nerve cells in the brain area striatum process information to plan and execute our movements at just the right time and with the right vigour. The results, presented in the journal Cell Reports, show that different cell types in the striatum receive signals from completely different parts of the cerebral cortex and thus respond to different types of information. (2020-01-28)

Nano-thin flexible touchscreens could be printed like newspaper
Taking a thin film common in cell phone touchscreens, researchers have used liquid metal chemistry to shrink it from 3D to 2D. The ultra-thin and ultra-flexible electronic material could be printed and rolled out like newspaper, for the touchscreens of the future. (2020-01-24)

Predictive touch response mechanism is a step toward a tactile internet
A team of researchers led by Elaine Wong at the University of Melbourne, Australia, developed a method for enhancing haptic feedback experiences in human-to-machine applications that are typical in the Tactile Internet. (2020-01-23)

How fruit flies flock together in orderly clusters
Opposing desires to congregate and maintain some personal space drive fruit flies to form orderly clusters, according to a study published today in eLife. (2020-01-21)

Discovery reveals how remora fishes know when to hitch a ride aboard their hosts
In findings published in the Journal of the Royal Society Open Science, researchers have detailed the discovery of a tactile-sensory system stowed within the suction disc of remora, believed to enable the fish to acutely sense contact pressure with host surfaces and gauge ocean forces in order to determine when to initiate their attachment, as well as adjust their hold on hosts while traversing long distances. (2020-01-15)

SFU research points to unprecedented and worrying rise in sea levels
A new study led by Simon Fraser University's Dean of Science, Professor Paul Kench, has discovered new evidence of sea-level variability in the central Indian Ocean. (2019-12-23)

How a penalty shootout is decided in the brain
Decision-making is controlled by different nerve cells. (2019-12-09)

New device enables battery-free computer input at the tip of your finger
Computer scientists at the University of Waterloo have created a device for wearable computer input suitable for many situations, just by touching your fingertips together in different ways. The device, called Tip-Tap, is inexpensive and battery-free through the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags to sense when fingertips touch. The device could, therefore, be added to disposable surgical gloves, allowing surgeons to access preoperative planning diagrams in an operating room. (2019-11-28)

Novel tactile display using computer-controlled surface adhesion
Touch surfaces have become ubiquitous and enable users to intuitively manipulate the displayed contents with their fingers. One limitation is that they cannot represent various types of surface states of real objects such as texture. Here, a research team led by experts from Osaka University proposes StickyTouch, a novel tactile display that represents adhesive information on a surface. Adhesion control can be achieved by a temperature sensitive adhesive sheet whose temperature is locally controlled. (2019-11-25)

Approaching the perception of touch in the brain
More than ten percent of the cerebral cortex are involved in processing information about our sense of touch -- a larger area than previously thought. This is the result of a joint study by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and Ruhr Universit├Ąt Bochum. (2019-11-25)

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