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Researchers pioneer new production method for heterostructure devices
Researchers at the University of Exeter have developed a pioneering production method for heterostructure devices, based on 2D materials such as graphene. (2020-06-19)

Researchers discover unique material design for brain-like computations
Over the past few decades, computers have seen dramatic progress in processing power; however, even the most advanced computers are relatively rudimentary in comparison with the complexities and capabilities of the human brain. (2020-06-18)

A salt solution toward better bioelectronics
A water-stable dopant enhances and stabilizes the performance of electron-transporting organic electrochemical transistors. (2020-06-14)

Engineers put tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses on a single chip
MIT engineers have designed a 'brain-on-a-chip,' smaller than a piece of confetti, that is made from tens of thousands of artificial brain synapses known as memristors -- silicon-based components that mimic the information-transmitting synapses in the human brain. (2020-06-08)

Graphene and 2D materials could move electronics beyond 'Moore's Law'
A team of researchers based in Manchester, the Netherlands, Singapore, Spain, Switzerland and the USA has published a new review on a field of computer device development known as spintronics, which could see graphene used as building block for next-generation electronics. (2020-06-03)

Tuning the interfacial properties of 2D heterophases though tilt-angles
For devices based on atomically thin two-dimensional (2D) materials, the properties of the interface play important roles in determining their performances. Chinese scientists correlated the electronic states of the 2D 1T'/2H-MoTe2 (metallic/semiconducting) interface with its atomic structures and found that its contact characteristics are tilt angle-dependent, providing useful guidelines to tune the local band structure and contact resistance via phase engineering. (2020-06-02)

Boosting energy efficiency of 2D material electronics using topological semimetal
SUTD researchers discover a new way to boost the energy efficiency of 2D semiconductor electronics by synergizing 2D materials and topological semimetals. (2020-06-02)

Carbon nanotube transistors make the leap from lab to factory floor
A technique for making carbon nanotube transistors in large quantities paves the way for more energy efficient, 3D microprocessors. (2020-06-01)

Study: Paper-thin gallium oxide transistor handles more than 8,000 volts
University at Buffalo electrical engineers created a gallium oxide-based transistor that can handle more than 8,000 volts. The transistor could lead to smaller and more efficient electronic systems that control and convert electric power -- a field of study known as power electronics -- in electric cars, locomotives and airplanes. In turn, this could help improve how far these vehicles can travel. (2020-05-29)

Worth their salt: Skoltech and MIPT researchers report first case of hexagonal NaCl
Skoltech and MIPT scientists have predicted and then experimentally confirmed the existence of exotic hexagonal thin films of NaCl on a diamond surface. These films may be useful as gate dielectrics for field effect transistors in electric vehicles and telecommunication equipment. (2020-05-25)

A theoretical boost to nano-scale devices
Researchers with the School of Electrical Engineering at KAIST have developed a new approach to the underlying physics of semiconductors. They calculated the quasi-Fermi levels in molecular junctions applying an initio approach. (2020-05-17)

Physicists offer a new 'spin' on memory
University of Arizona researchers report a discovery that opens new possibilities in the development of spintronics, a new type of memory storage capable of processing information much faster than current technology while consuming less energy. (2020-05-15)

Atomically thin magnets for next generation spin and quantum electronics
In 2005, Science asked if it was possible to develop a magnetic semiconductor that could work at room temperature. Now, just fifteen years later, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed those materials in two-dimensional form, solving one of science's most intractable problems. (2020-05-13)

NIST scientists create new recipe for single-atom transistors
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and their colleagues at the University of Maryland have developed a step-by-step recipe to produce single-atom transistors. (2020-05-11)

Plasma electrons can be used to produce metallic films
Computers, mobile phones and all other electronic devices contain thousands of transistors, linked together by thin films of metal. Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a method that can use the electrons in a plasma to produce these films. (2020-05-07)

Outer tube-selectively boron-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes for thermoelectric applications
A research group led by Hiroyuki Muramatsu of Shinshu University succeeded in selectively doping the outer tube of DWNTs with boron. This significantly increased the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient which resulted in a highly enhanced thermoelectric performance of the DWNTs. This advancement allows for an extremely effective method to add functionality such as high electrical conductivity, chemical activation, improvement of thermoelectric properties while maintaining the function of the inner CNT. (2020-05-02)

Two steps closer to flexible, powerful, fast bioelectronic devices
Led by Biomedical Engineering Professor Dion Khodagholy, researchers have designed biocompatible ion-driven soft transistors that can perform real-time neurologically relevant computation and a mixed-conducting particulate composite that allows creation of electronic components out of a single material. These have promise for bioelectronic devices that are fast, sensitive, biocompatible, soft, and flexible, with long-term stability in physiological environments such as the human body. In particular, they could facilitate diagnosis and monitoring of neurological disease. (2020-04-24)

Substances trapped in nanobubbles exhibit unusual properties
Skoltech scientists modeled the behavior of nanobubbles appearing in van der Waals heterostructures and the behavior of substances trapped inside the bubbles. In the future, the new model will help obtain equations of state for substances in nano-volumes, opening up new opportunities for the extraction of hydrocarbons from rock with large amounts of micro- and nanopores. (2020-04-15)

Single-electron pumping in a ZnO single-nanobelt transistor
Diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) have traditionally been employed to implement spin-based quantum computing and quantum information processing. However, their low Curie temperature creates the necessity for wide bandgap DMSs operating at room temperature. Now researchers from Institute of Physics have built a single-electron transistor (SET) with a global back-gate using a wide bandgap ZnO nanobelt. Clear Coulomb oscillations and accurate single -electron pumping were achieved, which are useful for quantum computing and quantum information. (2020-04-10)

Researchers demonstrate a platform for future optical transistors
Photons do not interact with each other well, which creates a big problem for microelectronics engineers. A group of researchers from ITMO University, together with colleagues, have come up with a new solution to this problem by creating a planar system where photons couple to other particles, which enables them to interact with each other. (2020-04-09)

Magic twist angles of graphene sheets identified
Graphene is 200 times stronger than steel and can be as much as 6 times lighter. These characteristics alone make it a popular material in manufacturing. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, including doctoral student Soumendu Bagchi, his adviser Huck Beng Chew in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, and collaborator Harley Johnson from Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, identified how twisted graphene sheets behave and their stability at different sizes and temperatures. (2020-03-11)

Room-temperature bonded interface improves cooling of gallium nitride devices
A room-temperature bonding technique for integrating wide bandgap materials such as gallium nitride (GaN) with thermally-conducting materials such as diamond could boost the cooling effect on GaN devices and facilitate better performance through higher power levels, longer device lifetime, improved reliability and reduced manufacturing costs. (2020-03-11)

Bristol scientists demonstrate first non-volatile nano relay operation at 200°C
Researchers at the University of Bristol have come up with a new type of nanoelectromechanical relay to enable reliable high-temperature, non-volatile memory. The work, which is reported in Nature Communications, is an important development for all-electric vehicles and more-electric aircraft which require electronics with integrated data storage that can operate in extreme temperatures with high energy efficiency. (2020-03-04)

A small step for atoms, a giant leap for microelectronics
Rice materials scientist Boris Yakobson and colleagues in Taiwan and China report in Nature on making large single-crystal sheets of hexagonal boron nitride, touted as a key insulator in future two-dimensional electronics. (2020-03-04)

Black phosphorous tunnel field-effect transistor as an alternative ultra-low power switch?
Researchers have reported a black phosphorus transistor that can be used as an alternative ultra-low power switch. A research team led by Professor Sungjae Cho in the KAIST Department of Physics developed a thickness-controlled black phosphorous tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) that shows 10-times lower switching power consumption as well as 10,000-times lower standby power consumption than conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. (2020-02-20)

Hybrid transistor improves next-generation displays
A simple, cost-effective technique uses solution-based printing to make better ultrathin transistors. (2020-02-11)

DNA-like material could bring even smaller transistors
A material shaped like a one-dimensional DNA helix might further push the limits on a transistor's size. The material comes from a rare earth element called tellurium. (2020-02-10)

Rare-earth element material could produce world's smallest transistors
A material from a rare earth element, tellurium, could produce the world's smallest transistor, thanks to an Army-funded project. (2020-02-10)

New threads: Nanowires made of tellurium and nanotubes hold promise for wearable tech
Wearable tech requires both strength and flexibility. A new nanowire design -- a boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) filled with tellurium atomic chains -- holds promise for electronics triggered by light and pressure. In collaboration with Purdue University, Washington University and University of Texas at Dallas, Michigan Tech physicists created and tested the new nanowire alongside carbon nanotubes. (2020-02-10)

Chemists have managed to stabilize the 'capricious' phosphorus
An international team of Russian, Swedish and Ukrainian scientists has identified an effective strategy to improve the stability of two-dimensional black phosphorus, which is a promising material for use in optoelectronics. (2020-01-17)

New method gives robust transistors
A new method to fit together layers of semiconductors as thin as a few nanometers has resulted in not only a scientific discovery but also a new type of transistor for high-power electronic devices. The result, published in Applied Physics Letters, has aroused huge interest. The achievement is the result of a close collaboration between scientists at Linköping University and SweGaN, a spin-off company from materials science research at LiU. (2020-01-07)

Demonstration of high-speed SOT-MRAM memory cell compatible with 300mm Si CMOS technology
Researchers have announced the demonstration of high-speed spin-orbit-torque magnetoresistive random access memory cell compatible with 300 mm Si CMOS technology. (2019-12-09)

Reorganizing a computer chip: Transistors can now both process and store information
Researchers have created a more feasible way to combine transistors and memory on a chip, potentially bringing faster computing. (2019-12-09)

Breakthrough made in detecting carbon impurities in gallium nitride crystals via light
Carbon impurity has long hindered efficiency in nitride-based electronic and optical devices. But Researchers at Tohoku University, have discovered a method that can quickly detect carbon impurity using light. (2019-12-08)

Bending an organic semiconductor can boost electrical flow
Slightly bending semiconductors made of organic materials can roughly double the speed of electricity flowing through them and could benefit next-generation electronics such as sensors and solar cells, according to Rutgers-led research. The study is published in the journal Advanced Science. (2019-12-03)

A record-setting transistor
A transistor that could be the key to higher bandwidth wireless communications...while requiring less battery life. A UD research team has created a high-electron mobility transistor with record-setting properties. It's an innovation in both material design and device application design. (2019-11-26)

Clean carbon nanotubes with superb properties
Scientists at Aalto University, Finland, and Nagoya University, Japan, have found a new way to make ultra-clean carbon nanotube transistors with superior semiconducting properties. (2019-11-19)

Beyond Moore's Law: Taking transistor arrays into the third dimension
Silicon integrated circuits, which are used in computer processors, are approaching the maximum feasible density of transistors on a single chip -- at least, in two-dimensional arrays. (2019-11-19)

Kick-starting Moore's Law? New 'synthetic' method for making microchips could help
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a new method for producing atomically-thin semiconducting crystals that could one day enable more powerful and compact electronic devices, according to their paper published today in Nature Nanotechnology. By using specially-treated silicon surfaces to tailor the crystals' size and shape, the researchers have found a potentially faster and less expensive way to produce next-generation semiconductor crystals for microchips. The crystalline materials produced could enable new scientific discoveries (2019-11-18)

Large scale integrated circuits produced in printing press
Researchers at Linköping University and RISE, Campus Norrköping, have shown for the first time that it is possible to print complete integrated circuits with more than 100 organic electrochemical transistors. The result has been published in Nature Communications. (2019-11-11)

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