Current Tree Rings News and Events

Current Tree Rings News and Events, Tree Rings News Articles.
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Climate impacts drive east-west divide in forest seed production
Younger, smaller trees that comprise much of North America's eastern forests have increased their seed production under climate change. But older, larger trees that dominate western forests have been less responsive, a Duke-led study warns. This continental divide could limit western forests' ability to regenerate following large-scale diebacks linked to rising temperatures and intensifying droughts. Over time this might dramatically alter the composition and structure of 21st century North American forests. (2021-02-23)

Parasitic plants conspire to keep hosts alive
The plant that encourages kissing at Christmas is in fact a parasite, and new research reveals mistletoe has an unusual feeding strategy. When two mistletoes invade the same tree, they increase photosynthesis to get the nutrients they need, essentially sharing the tree and causing it less harm. (2021-02-23)

Terrestrial laser scanning for monitoring hydrological cycle of trees
Water is an essential element for all living things. Understanding the dynamics of water in trees is crucial for understanding the consequences of climate change and altered water availability for forest ecosystems. A joint research project with Samuli Junttila PhD, and Professor Masato Katoh of Shinshu University's Institute for Mountain Science and others demonstrates a new laser scanning based method that can be used to monitor changes in leaf water content of tree communities. (2021-02-22)

Magnetic reversal 42,000 years ago triggered global environmental change
Nearly 42,000 years ago, when Earth's magnetic fields reversed, this triggered major environmental changes, extinction events, and long-term changes in human behavior, a new study reports. (2021-02-18)

Ancient relic points to a turning point in Earth's history 42,000 years ago
The temporary breakdown of Earth's magnetic field 42,000 years ago sparked major climate shifts that led to global environmental change and mass extinctions, a new international study co-led by UNSW Sydney and the South Australian Museum shows. (2021-02-18)

Songbirds' reproductive success reduced by natural gas compressor noise
Some songbirds are not dissuaded by constant, loud noise emitted by natural gas pipeline compressors and will establish nests nearby. The number of eggs they lay is unaffected by the din, but their reproductive success ultimately is diminished. (2021-02-18)

Scientists developed a novel method of automatic soil mapping
A team of soil scientists developed a new approach to the automatic generation and updating of soil maps. Having applied machine learning technologies to a set of rules traditionally used by experts in manual mapping, the team obtained a highly accurate model that provides easy-to-interpret results. (2021-02-15)

Stable armchairlike hexazine N6 ring in tungsten hexanitride
We have successfully synthesized WN6 at 126-165 GPa after laser heating up to ?3500 K. The WN6 phase contains novel armchairlike N6 rings. Future efforts in the synthesis and recovery of TMNs will lead to a wealth of knowledge in the novel chemistry and physical properties of the single-bonded hexazine-bearing nitrides. (2021-02-10)

Long-term stress linked to increased risk of heart attack
Can long-term stress lead to heart attacks? Most people would probably answer in the affirmative, but the scientific evidence of this is scarce. A new study by researchers from Linköping University in Sweden reveals that the levels of the stress hormone cortisol were increased in the months preceding a heart attack. The results, published in Scientific Reports, suggest that long-term stress is a risk factor for heart attacks. (2021-02-10)

Chemists identified necessary conditions for successful synthesis of small molecules
A team of researchers from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Saint Petersburg State University identified the factors that affect the speed of synthesis of organic molecules consisting of several heterocycles. According to the team, accurate selection of reagents and reaction conditions can help efficiently obtain compounds used in the pharmaceutical industry. (2021-02-09)

WVU biologists uncover forests' unexpected role in climate change
New research from West Virginia University biologists shows that trees around the world are consuming more carbon dioxide than previously reported, making forests even more important in regulating the Earth's atmosphere and forever shift how we think about climate change. (2021-02-08)

Forests of the world in 3D
Primeval forests are of great importance for biodiversity and global carbon and water cycling. The three-dimensional structure of forests plays an important role because it influences processes of gas and energy exchange with the atmosphere, and provides habitats for numerous species. An international research team led by Göttingen University investigated the variety of different complex structures found in the world's forests, and the factors that explain this diversity. Results were published in Nature Communications. (2021-02-05)

DNA-based technique allows researchers to determine age of living beluga whales in Alaska
Researchers can now determine the age and sex of living beluga whales in Alaska's Cook Inlet thanks to a new DNA-based technique that uses information from small samples of skin tissue. (2021-02-04)

Hierarchical dynamics
Researchers investigate signal transfer in proteins across multiple time scales (2021-02-03)

Research identifies more sustainable, cost-effective approach to treating citrus canker
Behlau and his colleagues showed that it is possible to control citrus canker by spraying much less water and copper. ''By adjusting both copper and water usage based on the volume of the citrus trees without affecting the quality of disease control, we have taken an important step to a more economically and environmentally sustainable citrus industry.'' (2021-02-03)

Fungus that eats fungus could help coffee farmers
Coffee rust is a parasitic fungus and a big problem for coffee growers around the world. A study in the birthplace of coffee - Ethiopia - shows that another fungus seems to have the capacity to supress the rust outbreaks in this landscape. (2021-02-03)

Prosopis juliflora acutely reduces water resources in Ethiopia, costing rural livelihoods
New research has revealed how an invasion of the alien evergreen tree, Prosopis juliflora seriously diminishes water resources in the Afar Region of Ethiopia, consuming enough of this already scarce resource to irrigate cotton and sugarcane generating some US$ 320 million and US$ 470 million net benefits per year. (2021-01-29)

Coiling them up: Synthesizing organic molecules with a long helical structure
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology produced and extensively characterized novel organic molecules with a long helical structure. Unlike previous helical molecules, these longer compounds exhibit special interactions between coils that could give rise to interesting optical and chemical properties with applications in light polarization, catalysis, and molecular springs. (2021-01-29)

Scientists look to soils to learn how forests affect air quality, climate change
Two studies shed light on the complex relationships between tree types, forest soil nutrients and microbes, and their effect of affect air quality and climate change. (2021-01-29)

Eyes reveal life history of fish
If you look deep into the eyes of a fish, it will tell you its life story. Scientists from the University of California, Davis, demonstrate that they can use stable isotopic analysis of the eye lenses of freshwater fish -- including threatened and endangered salmon -- to reveal a fish's life history and what it ate along the way. (2021-01-28)

Neural network has learned to identify tree species
Skoltech scientists have developed an algorithm that can identify various tree species in satellite images. Commercial forest taxation providers and their end-users, including timber procurers and processors and forest industry entities, can use the new technology for quantitative and qualitative assessment of wood resources in leased areas. Also, this solution enables quick evaluations of underdeveloped forest areas in terms of investment appeal. (2021-01-28)

Thick lithosphere casts doubt on plate tectonics in Venus's geologically recent past
A study of a giant impact crater on Venus suggests that its lithosphere was too thick to have had Earth-like plate tectonics, at least for much of the past billion years. (2021-01-28)

Even machines need their greens
Image that products could be strengthened with the same living materials that provide nutrients to strengthen trees. Professor Qiming Wang's research lab is one of the first to infuse 3-D printer ink with living material. The material has potential for greater strength, to be flexible and self-heal. (2021-01-27)

When simpler is harder
Some languages require less neural activity than others. But these are not necessarily the ones we would imagine. In a study published today in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown that languages that are often considered 'easy' actually require an enormous amount of work from our brains. (2021-01-27)

Forests with diverse tree sizes and small clearings hinder wildland fire growth
A new 3D analysis shows that wildland fires flare up in forests populated by similar-sized trees or checkerboarded by large clearings and slow down where trees are more varied. (2021-01-27)

Seeds transfer their microbes to the next generation
Scientists have been pondering if the microbiome of plants is due to nature or nurture. Research at Stockholm University, published in Environmental Microbiology, showed that oak acorns contain a large diversity of microbes, and that oak seedlings inherit their microbiome from these acorns. The microorganisms found on the seed are often valuable for the plant, promoting its growth and protecting it against certain diseases. Each plant species harbours a distinct microbial community. (2021-01-21)

On the origins of money: Ancient European hoards full of standardized bronze objects
In the Early Bronze Age of Europe, ancient people used bronze objects as an early form of money, even going so far as to standardize the shape and weight of their currency, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Maikel H. G. Kuijpers and C?t?lin N. Popa of Leiden University, Netherlands. (2021-01-20)

Tree rings and the Laki volcano eruption: A closer look at climate
When Iceland's Laki volcano erupted in 1783, its effects rippled around the world. UArizona researchers have analyzed Alaskan tree rings to understand how climate responded in northwestern North America. The work will aid in fine-tuning future climate models. (2021-01-20)

Solar activity reconstructed over a millennium
An international team of researchers led by ETH Zurich has reconstructed solar activity back to the year 969 using measurements of radioactive carbon in tree rings. Those results help scientists to better understand the dynamics of the sun and allow more precise dating of organic materials using the C14 method. (2021-01-19)

Pillarene hybrid material shows enhanced tunable multicolor luminescence and sensing ability
Tunable luminescent materials are highly desirable owing to their broad application potential in various fields. Recently, a pillar[5]arene-based hybrid material with stimuli-responsive luminescent properties and ion sensing abilities has been elegantly constructed from a pyridine-modified conjugated pillar[5]arene and a planar chromophore oligo(phenylenevinylene) upon coordination of Cd (II) metal cores. Enhanced and tunable luminescence was achieved via the construction of the rigid coordinated structure and the effective modulation of pillar[5]arene. (2021-01-14)

Scientists discover bizarre new mode of snake locomotion
Researchers have discovered a new mode of snake locomotion that allows the brown tree snake to ascend much larger smooth cylinders than any previously known behavior. (2021-01-11)

This tree snake climbs with a lasso-like motion
Researchers reporting in Current Biology on January 11 have discovered that invasive brown tree snakes living on Guam can get around in a way that had never been seen before. The discovery of the snake's lasso-like locomotion for climbing their way up smooth vertical cylinders has important implications, both for understanding the snakes and for conservation practices aimed at protecting birds from them. (2021-01-11)

Knowledge of cycad branching behavior improves conservation
Research on cycad trees in Colombia, Guam, and the Philippines has illuminated how knowledge of their branching behavior may benefit conservation decisions for the endangered plants. In a study published in the December issue of the journal Horticulturae, scientists from the University of Guam and the Montgomery Botanical Center in Florida show that the number of times a cycad tree produces a branch can be used to infer the sex of the tree. (2021-01-11)

Megalodons gave birth to large newborns that likely grew by eating unhatched eggs in womb
A new study shows that the gigantic Megalodon or megatooth shark, which lived nearly worldwide roughly 15-3.6 million years ago and reached at least 50 feet (15 meters) in length, gave birth to babies larger than most adult humans. (2021-01-10)

Study reveals jellyfish create a 'virtual wall' to enhance performance
New discovery finds that Jellyfish create a ''ground effect,'' similar to how air squeezes between an airplane and ground during take-off, which builds pressure and a force that boosts performance. Never before has it been proven that an animal can create this phenomenon away from a solid boundary, let alone the open ocean. (2021-01-08)

Understanding disease-induced microbial shifts may reveal new crop management strategies
Currently, the only thing citrus growers can do to protect their crops from HLB is control the insect vector. Dozens of researchers are trying to find ways to manage the disease, using strategies ranging from pesticides to antibiotics to CLas-sniffing dogs. Understanding the plant microbiome, an exciting new frontier in plant disease management, is another strategy. (2021-01-05)

Largest study of Asia's rivers unearths 800 years of paleoclimate patterns
The SUTD study will be crucial for assessing future climatic changes and making more informed water management decisions. (2020-12-30)

A new species of mammal may have been found in Africa's montane forests
A research team from the University of Helsinki has discovered a tree hyrax in the Taita Hills, Kenya, which may belong to a species previously unknown to science. (2020-12-22)

Climate warming linked to tree leaf unfolding and flowering growing apart
Climate warming is linked to a widening interval between leaf unfolding and flowering in European trees, with implications for tree fitness and the wider environment, according to new research published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Ecology. (2020-12-21)

Study resolves the position of fleas on the tree of life
A study of more than 1,400 protein-coding genes of fleas has resolved one of the longest standing mysteries in the evolution of insects, reordering their placement in the tree of life and pinpointing who their closest relatives are. (2020-12-20)

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