Current Tropical Forests News and Events

Current Tropical Forests News and Events, Tropical Forests News Articles.
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Climate impacts drive east-west divide in forest seed production
Younger, smaller trees that comprise much of North America's eastern forests have increased their seed production under climate change. But older, larger trees that dominate western forests have been less responsive, a Duke-led study warns. This continental divide could limit western forests' ability to regenerate following large-scale diebacks linked to rising temperatures and intensifying droughts. Over time this might dramatically alter the composition and structure of 21st century North American forests. (2021-02-23)

Future ocean warming boosts tropical rainfall extremes
Climate models predict that the difference between El Niño and La Niña related tropical rainfall will increase over the next 80 years, even though the temperature difference between El Niño and La Niña may change only very little in response to global warming. A new study uncovers the reasons for this surprising fact. (2021-02-22)

Dozens of new lichen species discovered in East African mountain forests
The species diversity and relationships of lichens in the genus Leptogium, which are often very difficult to identify to species, were assessed on the basis of DNA analyses using a large dataset collected during more than 10 years from East Africa. (2021-02-22)

A dynamic forest floor
Walk along the beach after a winter storm and you'll see a shore littered with wracks of giant kelp, some 30 to 40 feet long -- evidence of the storm's impact on coastal kelp forests. (2021-02-22)

Northern Hemisphere cold surges result of Arctic and tropical Pacific synergistic effects
A case study on China's 2020-21 winter could help predict future extreme winter weather. (2021-02-19)

Animal evolution -- glimpses of ancient environments
Zoologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report the discovery of a trove of fossil fly larvae, and an intriguing caterpillar, encapsulated in samples of amber that are tens of millions of years old. (2021-02-19)

The distribution of vertebrate animals redefines temperate and cold climate regions
The distribution of vegetation is routinely used to classify climate regions worldwide, yet whether these regions are relevant to other organisms is unknown. Umeå researchers have established climate regions based on vertebrate species' distributions in a new study published in eLife. They found that while high-energy climate regions are similar across vertebrate and plant groups, there are large differences in temperate and cold climates. (2021-02-18)

A (pollen-free) sigh of relief for Japan: The genetics of male sterility in cedar trees
Pollen from Cryptomeria japonica, or Japanese cedar, is widely known to cause allergies. But, male-sterile trees are known to be devoid of pollen. Now, researchers from the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute, Japan, have studied the genetic variations in the male sterility gene (MS1) in these trees. This can help in selectively breeding male-sterile plants to counter the discomfort caused by pollen allergies and overcome the need to stay indoors during the pollen season. (2021-02-17)

Poking the paradigm
Deprive a mountain range of its wolves, and soon the burgeoning deer population will strip its slopes bare. ''I now suspect that just as a deer herd lives in mortal fear of its wolves, so does a mountain live in mortal fear of its deer,'' wrote ecologist Aldo Leopold in his landmark 1949 title ''A Sand County Almanac.'' (2021-02-17)

Ferns in the mountains
In a new study in the Journal of Biogeography an international team of researchers led by Harvard University assembled one of the largest global assessment of fern diversity. The study integrated digitized herbarium data, genetic data, and climatic data and discovered 58% of fern species occur in eight principally montane hotspots that comprise only 7% of Earth's land area. And within these hotspots, patterns of heightened diversity were amplified at higher elevations above 1000 meters. (2021-02-16)

RUDN University biologists studied the effect of jungles on global warming
Biologists from RUDN University described the role of tropical rainforests in the production of methane, the second most harmful greenhouse gas after CO2. It turned out that some areas of rainforests not only consumed methane but also emitted it. (2021-02-16)

Challenge of the summer rainfall forecast skill in China: A possible solution
The Mongolian Cyclone is a major meteorological driving force across southeast Asia. This cyclone is known for transporting aerosols, affecting where precipitation develops. Meteorologists are seeking ways to improve seasonal prediction of the relationship between the Mongolian cyclone and South Asia high. These features are major components of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) and the corresponding heavy rain events. New research suggests that analyzing these phenomena in the upper-level atmosphere will enhance the summer rainfall forecast skill in China. (2021-02-16)

More trees do not always create a cooler planet, Clark University geographer finds
New research by Christopher A. Williams, an environmental scientist and professor in Clark University's Graduate School of Geography, reveals that deforestation in the U.S. does not always cause planetary warming, as is commonly assumed; instead, in some places, it actually cools the planet. A peer-reviewed study by Williams and his team, ''Climate Impacts of U.S. Forest Loss Span Net Warming to Net Cooling,'' published today (Feb. 12) in Science Advances. (2021-02-12)

Combination of pine scent and ozone as super source of particulate emissions
Scientists have managed to figure out why conifer forests produce so many fine particles into the atmosphere. Aerosol particles are particularly abundant when ?-pinene, the molecule responsible for the characteristic pattern of pine trees reacts with atmospheric ozone. (2021-02-11)

Small mammals climb higher to flee warming temperatures in the Rockies
The golden-mantled ground squirrel is one of the most photographed animals in the Rocky Mountains. It's also joining many other species of rodents and shrews in Colorado that are making an ominous trek: They're climbing uphill to escape from climate change. (2021-02-11)

Scientists propose three-step method to reverse significant reforestation side effect
Reforestation efforts using a monoculture of a fast-growing tree species, while effective, significantly impact the soil water content of humid, tropical regions and threatens global freshwater supplies. Scientists have now found that the transpiration rate and transpiration-related trait values are up to 10 times greater in the fast-growing species than nearby, dominant slow-growing species. The team has proposed a three-step method for ensuring reforestation efforts in tropical regions don't harm the surrounding soil water content. (2021-02-10)

Commodity farming accelerating climate change in the Amazon rainforest
Researchers report that large-scale commercial farms on deforested land in the southern Amazon result in higher temperature increases and less rainfall than small-scale farms (2021-02-09)

High CO2 to slow tropical fish move to cooler waters
A new study from the University of Adelaide, published in Nature Climate Change, shows that the ocean acidification predicted under continuing high CO2 emissions may make cooler, temperate waters less welcoming. (2021-02-08)

Combined bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire spell uncertain future for forests
Bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire alone are not a death sentence for Colorado's beloved forests--but when combined, their toll may become more permanent, shows new research from the University of Colorado Boulder. (2021-02-08)

WVU biologists uncover forests' unexpected role in climate change
New research from West Virginia University biologists shows that trees around the world are consuming more carbon dioxide than previously reported, making forests even more important in regulating the Earth's atmosphere and forever shift how we think about climate change. (2021-02-08)

All in the head? Brains adapt to support new species
Scientists studying forest dwelling butterflies in Central and South America have discovered that changes in the way animals perceive and process information from their environment can support the emergence of new species. The study led by the University of Bristol, and published today [9 February] in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), has implications for how new species might evolve and the underappreciated role of changes in the brain. (2021-02-08)

Climate change may have driven the emergence of SARS-CoV-2
Global greenhouse gas emissions over the last century have made southern China a hotspot for bat-borne coronaviruses, by driving growth of forest habitat favoured by bats. (2021-02-05)

Forests of the world in 3D
Primeval forests are of great importance for biodiversity and global carbon and water cycling. The three-dimensional structure of forests plays an important role because it influences processes of gas and energy exchange with the atmosphere, and provides habitats for numerous species. An international research team led by Göttingen University investigated the variety of different complex structures found in the world's forests, and the factors that explain this diversity. Results were published in Nature Communications. (2021-02-05)

Dynamics of radiocesium in forests after the Fukushima disaster: Concerns and some hope
The 2011 nuclear disaster at Fukushima, Japan caused a great amount of radioactive cesium to spread to nearby forests. Now, in a chapter in the latest technical document of the International Atomic Energy Agency, researchers from Japan, in collaboration with experts in Europe, explore the dynamic flow of these radionuclides in forest ecosystems. Their compilation of data and analyses on radiocesium dynamics will help us develop better forest remediation strategies. (2021-02-03)

Forty years of coral spawning captured in one place for the first time
Efforts to understand when corals reproduce have been given a boost thanks to a new resource that gives scientists open access to more than forty years' worth of information about coral spawning. Led by researchers at Newcastle University, UK, and James Cook University, Australia, the Coral Spawning Database (CSD) for the first time collates vital information about the timing and geographical variation of coral spawning. (2021-01-29)

Hurricanes and typhoons moving 30km closer to coasts every decade
High-intensity tropical cyclones have been moving closer to coasts over the past 40 years, potentially causing more destruction than before. (2021-01-29)

Scientists look to soils to learn how forests affect air quality, climate change
Two studies shed light on the complex relationships between tree types, forest soil nutrients and microbes, and their effect of affect air quality and climate change. (2021-01-29)

Ancient indigenous New Mexican community knew how to sustainably coexist with wildfire
Wildfires are the enemy when they threaten homes in California and elsewhere. But a new study led by SMU suggests that people living in fire-prone places can learn to manage fire as an ally to prevent dangerous blazes, just like people who lived nearly 1,000 years ago. (2021-01-27)

Harpy eagles could be under greater threat than previously thought
New research led by the University of Plymouth (UK) suggests estimates of the species' current distribution are potentially overestimating range size. (2021-01-27)

Top 10 insights in climate science in 2020 selected by 57 leading global researchers
In a report presented today to Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), report authors outlined some of 2020's most important findings within the field of climate science, ranging from improved models that reveal the need for aggressive emission cuts in order to meet the Paris Agreement to the growing use of human rights litigation to catalyze climate action. (2021-01-27)

Forests with diverse tree sizes and small clearings hinder wildland fire growth
A new 3D analysis shows that wildland fires flare up in forests populated by similar-sized trees or checkerboarded by large clearings and slow down where trees are more varied. (2021-01-27)

Growth of northern Tibet proved the key to East Asian biodiversity
In a recent study, a joint research team led by scientists from Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the University of Bristol (UK) and the Open University (UK) has revealed the first direct mechanism explaining how the growth of mountains in Northern Tibet drastically altered climate, vegetation and plant diversity in East Asia. (2021-01-27)

Rediscovery of the 'extinct' Pinatubo volcano mouse
When Mount Pinatubo exploded in 1990, the surrounding Philippine ecosystem was devastated. Scientists thought that the Pinatubo volcano mouse that lived there went extinct. But researchers just discovered the volcano mouse alive and well. (2021-01-22)

UCI researchers: Climate change will alter the position of the Earth's tropical rain belt
In a study to be published Jan. 18 in Nature Climate Change, researchers at the University of California, Irvine describe future changes to the tropical rain belt with expected climate change. The changes will cause droughts in large sections of the globe, threatening biodiversity and food security. (2021-01-18)

Intertropical Convergence Zone limits climate predictions in the tropical Atlantic
The strongest climate fluctuation on time scales of a few years is the so-called El Niño phenomenon, which originates in the Pacific. A similar circulation pattern exists in the Atlantic, which scientists under the leadership of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have studied in more detail. Their results, now published in the international journal Nature Communications, contribute to a better understanding of this climate fluctuation and pose a challenge for prediction models. (2021-01-15)

Large mammals make soil more fertile in tropical forests
A study conducted by scientists at São Paulo State University demonstrates that animals like peccaries and tapirs boost soil levels of nitrogen, an essential element to plant growth. (2021-01-15)

Human-induced climate change caused the northwestern Pacific warming record in August 2020
A new study led by National Institute for Environmental Studies researchers, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, revealed that the record-warm sea surface temperature over the northwestern Pacific in August 2020 could not be expected to occur without human-induced climate changes. Such extremely warm condition is likely to become a new normal climate in August by the mid-21st century, needing the prompt implementation of adaptation measures for anthropogenic global warming. (2021-01-14)

Climate change doesn't spare the smallest
With a combined century of experience in the tropics, the University of Pennsylvania's Daniel Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs have seen a striking contraction of insect numbers and diversity. They share new data suggesting that climate change is the culprit and a way to protect the survivors: a bioliteracy program that aims to educate Costa Rican residents about the diversity around them and empower them to conserve it. It's a model they hope catches on and spreads around the globe. (2021-01-14)

Need to reduce work-related stress? It's a walk in the park
Research from the University of Tsukuba examined the relationship between ''sense of coherence'' (a quality indicative of stress-coping ability) and frequency of walking in forests or greenspaces. The aim was to find easy coping devices for workplace stress. Forest/greenspace walking at least once a week was found to correlate with those with a stronger sense of coherence. The findings suggest the benefits of walking in urban greenspaces or in forests to help with stress management. (2021-01-13)

Smithsonian scientists reduce uncertainty in forest carbon storage calculations
Helene Muller-Landau, staff scientist was invited to write an authoritative review about carbon storage in forests. Her team combed through existing studies and came up with some novel conclusions of their own. (2021-01-13)

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