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Current Trust News and Events, Trust News Articles.
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When painting reveals increases in social trust
Scientists from the CNRS, ENS-PSL, Inserm, and Sciences Po revealed an increase in facial displays of trustworthiness in European painting between the fourteenth and twenty-first centuries. The findings, published in Nature Communications on 22 September 2020, were obtained by applying face-processing software to two groups of portraits, suggesting an increase in trustworthiness in society that closely follows rising living standards over the course of this period. (2020-09-22)

Hospitals miss mental illness diagnosis in more than a quarter of patients
Severe mental illness diagnoses are missed by clinicians in more than one quarter of cases when people are hospitalised for other conditions, finds a new study led by UCL researchers, published in PLOS Medicine. (2020-09-17)

People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, study shows
People prefer coronavirus contact tracing to be carried out by a combination of apps and humans, a new study shows. (2020-09-10)

Caffeine shot delivers wakeup call on antifungal drug resistance
The management of fungal infections in plants and humans could be transformed by a breakthrough in understanding how fungi develop resistance to drugs. It was previously thought that only mutations in a fungi's DNA would result in antifungal drug resistance. Current diagnostic techniques rely on sequencing all of a fungi's DNA to find such mutations. Scientists from the University of Edinburgh have discovered that fungi can develop drug resistance without changes to their DNA -- their genetic code. (2020-09-09)

Apps and social distancing: Why we accept corona rules - or not
Study in psychology explores which factors are related to our motivation to use corona apps and to perform social distancing. (2020-09-04)

Improving FDA's COVID-19 vaccine authorization and approval process
On March 28, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) exercised its Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) authority to allow the use of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of COVID-19, and on June 15, the agency revoked this authorization. In JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, a research team proposes reforms that the FDA could implement to improve the EUA process and drug approvals during public health crises, which could increase the FDA's credibility and the public's trust in it. (2020-08-31)

How to make AI trustworthy
One of the biggest impediments to adoption of new technologies is trust in AI. Now, a new tool developed by USC Viterbi Engineering researchers generates automatic indicators if data and predictions generated by AI algorithms are trustworthy (2020-08-27)

Trust the power of markets
Organizations using groups or committees to make decisions might do better to crowdsource their decisions, says UC Riverside-led research. The study found that people trust groups even though their susceptibility to manipulation can cause poor decisions. Information markets, in which people bet on potential outcomes, make more accurate decisions, but people trust them less. Once people get used to using markets they trust them more, making markets a useful decision-making tool for large organizations. (2020-08-25)

New surgical approach for women at risk of ovarian cancer
A new two-stage surgical approach for cancer prevention is highly acceptable among premenopausal women at high risk of ovarian cancer, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London. (2020-08-24)

Defiance and low trust in medical doctors related to vaccine scepticism
A new study shows that individuals who react negatively to rules and recommendations and have lower trust in doctors more often use complementary and alternative medicine, that is, treatments or substances that are not included in the care offered or recommended by doctors. The study included altogether 770 parents of young children. (2020-08-20)

Trust is key to effectiveness in virtual communities, researchers find
With the global COVID-19 pandemic shifting more and more of our work and school online, virtual communities are more important than ever -- but how do we know, without bias, that our online groups are actually successful in helping us with our goals? A team of researchers based in Italy think has proposed the first objective metric to assess the effectiveness of virtual groups. (2020-08-19)

Toddlers who use touchscreens show attention differences
New research from the TABLET project recruited 12-month-old infants who had different levels of touchscreen usage. (2020-08-19)

Food safety model may help pandemic management
No precedent exists for managing the COVID-19 pandemic - although a plan for working through major public food scares may point to the best ways of alerting and communicating with the public. (2020-08-17)

Transgender and gender-diverse individuals more likely to be autistic
Transgender and gender-diverse adults are three to six times more likely as cisgender adults (individuals whose gender identity corresponds to their sex assigned at birth) to be diagnosed as autistic, according to a new study by scientists at the University of Cambridge's Autism Research Centre. (2020-08-07)

Large proportion of NHS workers may have already had COVID-19
New research finds a high prevalence of anosmia among NHS healthcare workers between February and April. Nearly two thirds of participants lost their sense of smell or taste in the period. The study also finds a strong association between smell loss and positive Covid-19 test results, with those who had lost their sense of smell being five times more likely to test positive - suggesting a large proportion of healthcare workers may have already been infected. (2020-08-06)

Consumers don't fully trust smart home technologies
Smart home technologies are marketed to enhance your home and make life easier. However, UK consumers are not convinced that they can trust the privacy and security of these technologies, a study by WMG, University of Warwick has shown. (2020-08-04)

Sharing a secret...the quantum way
Researchers at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, have demonstrated a record setting quantum protocol for sharing a secret amongst many parties. (2020-07-31)

Genetic variant may explain why some women don't need pain relief during childbirth
Women who do not need pain relief during childbirth may be carriers of a key genetic variant that acts a natural epidural, say scientists at the University of Cambridge. In a study published today in the journal Cell Reports, the researchers explain how the variant limits the ability of nerve cells to send pain signals to the brain. (2020-07-21)

Trust me if you can
Each year, wind turbines are responsible for the death of hundreds of thousands of airborne animals such as bats. To find a constructive way out of this ''green-green'' dilemma, companies building and running wind turbines might have to work together with environmental experts and conservationists. Yet lack of trust between them can hinder effective collaboration. Scientists of the Leibniz-IZW show: shared values are not sufficient to build trust, as beliefs and emotions have stronger influence. (2020-07-09)

Study reveals how bacteria build essential carbon-fixing machinery
Scientists from the University of Liverpool have revealed new insight into how cyanobacteria construct the organelles that are essential for their ability to photosynthesise. (2020-07-08)

SUNY Downstate study finds wide variation in trust of health information by Hispanics
Hispanic adults vary widely in their reported trust of health information sources, suggesting that information tailored to specific ethnic subgroups and targeted by age group may be beneficial, according to results of a study by SUNY Downstate Assistant Professor Marlene Camacho-Rivera, MS, MPH, ScD. (2020-07-01)

Study gauges how Kansans get information on COVID-19, which sources they trust
A researcher in KU's Center for Excellence in Health Communications to Underserved Populations surveyed Kansans over a 96-hour window to gauge where they got coronavirus info. He found they trusted the governor's briefing, local and national media most, while trusting social media the least. (2020-06-30)

Striking differences revealed in COVID-19 mortality between NHS trusts
A University of Cambridge team led by Professor Mihaela van der Schaar and intensive care consultant Dr Ari Ercole of the Cambridge Centre for AI in Medicine (CCAIM) is calling for urgent research into the striking differences in COVID-19 deaths they have discovered between the intensive care units of NHS trusts across England. (2020-06-23)

"Fake news" lowers trust in mainstream media across party lines, study finds
A Rutgers-led study finds that online misinformation, or ''fake news,'' lowers people's trust in mainstream media across party lines. (2020-06-18)

New research says displaying fake reviews increases consumer trust in platforms by 80%
Many people are using COVID-19 quarantine to get projects done at home, meaning plenty of online shopping for tools and supplies. But do you buy blind? Research shows 97% of consumers consult product reviews before making a purchase. Fake reviews are a significant threat for online review portals and product search engines given the potential for damage to consumer trust. Little is known about what review portals should do with fraudulent reviews after detecting them. (2020-06-18)

Mild thyroid dysfunction affects one in five women with a history of miscarriage or subfertility
Mild thyroid abnormalities affect up to one in five women with a history of miscarriage or subfertility which is a prolonged time span of trying to become pregnant, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-06-17)

Liver perfusion could save 7 in 10 rejected donor livers
A major study investigating the effectiveness of liver perfusion as a technique to improve the function of donor livers that would have otherwise been rejected has shown that up to 7 in every 10 could be used after just 4-6 hours of the assessment. (2020-06-17)

School may be the key to improvement for children in social care
Children in social care have poorer mental health and perform worse in school than other children. But they have trust in the school staff and perform better after individual assessment at school. These are findings in a doctoral thesis from Linköping University. (2020-06-12)

Royal Marsden trial leads to practice changing milestone for advanced anal cancer
Results from the first ever randomised clinical trial in advanced anal cancer patients, led and supported by The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Cancer Research UK, in collaboration with colleagues in the US, Norway and Australia, has led to a practice changing milestone with a new approach to treatment which is safer and more effective than previously recommended treatments for this group of patients. Published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology today, (Friday 12th June 2020). (2020-06-12)

How to handle fraudulent reviews on online portals? Study gives tips to managers
A new study sought to determine how consumers respond to potentially fraudulent reviews and how review portals (e.g., Amazon, Expedia, TripAdvisor, Yelp) can leverage this information to design better fraud-management policies and increase consumers' trust. It found that portals that include fraudulent reviews are more likely to boost buyers' trust. (2020-06-11)

People make irrational trust decisions precisely
Online health information is deemed doubly less trustworthy if the text includes both ''shouting'' and spelling errors together, according to a new study at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS). (2020-06-10)

New Zealanders' attitudes changed after pandemic lockdown
In the first few weeks of the lockdown of New Zealand in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, residents reported a slight increase in mental distress but higher levels of confidence in the government, science and the police, as well as greater patriotism, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-06-04)

Before COVID-19 100+ experts identified top threats & opportunities for global health
Just a few weeks before the first cases of COVID-19 were made public, a group of more than 100 leaders in health and medicine was imagining the future of health innovation and factors that could determine its success or failure,This hypothetical series of events, now beginning to play out in real time, is described -- alongside other future-oriented scenarios -- in a new report released today by the US Pharmacopeia (USP) and the MIT Center for Collective Intelligence (MIT CCI). (2020-05-21)

NUI Galway research show blood pressure lowering reduces risk of developing dementia
Research completed in NUI Galway has shown that lowering blood pressure by taking blood pressure medications reduces the risk of developing dementia and cognitive impairment by 7%. The findings are published today in a leading international medical journal, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). (2020-05-21)

Pine martens like to have neighbors -- but not too near
Pine martens need neighbors but like to keep their distance, according to new research. (2020-05-15)

'Pingers' could save porpoises from fishing nets
Underwater sound devices called 'pingers' could be an effective, long-term way to prevent porpoises getting caught in fishing nets with no negative behavioural effects, newly published research suggests. (2020-05-13)

New weapon identified in arsenal against disease
New research describes the structure and composition of supramolecular attack particles (SMAPs) and their role in killing targeted cells. Identified as having a core of cytotoxic proteins surrounded by a glycoprotein shell the SMAPs are released by killer T cells and can be left in the environment like a landmine to await and destroy infected and cancerous cells. (2020-05-12)

Survey: Half of Americans concerned about new moms, babies being in public amid COVID-19
A new national survey conducted by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center confirms these fears, finding that nearly 80% of respondents would be concerned about themselves or an expectant mother in their life in the midst of the current COVID-19 outbreak, with almost half expressing fear of going to a scheduled prenatal appointment. (2020-05-07)

Vitamin D linked to low virus death rate -- Study
A new study has found an association between low average levels of vitamin D and high numbers of COVID-19 cases and mortality rates across 20 European countries. (2020-05-07)

Robot vacuum cleaner conveys seven dwarf personalities by movement alone
Researchers used a vacuum cleaner and the personalities of three of the Seven Dwarfs from Snow White to demonstrate that people can correctly infer a robot's personality solely by how it moves. (2020-05-04)

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