Current Tuberculosis News and Events

Current Tuberculosis News and Events, Tuberculosis News Articles.
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Not as simple as thought: How bacteria form membrane vesicles
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel mechanism by which bacteria form membrane vesicles, which bacteria employ to communicate with each other or to defend themselves against antibiotics. By studying mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MCB), which also includes tuberculosis-causing bacteria, the researchers demonstrated that environmental stimuli dictate the route by which the MCB form membrane vesicles. Further, their observations were consistent among various MCB. This study has implications for vaccine development as well as novel therapies. (2021-01-14)

Resist the resistance: fighting the good fight against bacteria
Drug-resistant bacteria could lead to more deaths than cancer by 2050, according to a report commissioned by the United Kingdom in 2014 and jointly supported by the U.K. government and the Wellcome Trust. In an effort to reduce the potential infection-caused 10 million deaths worldwide, Penn State researcher Scott Medina has developed a peptide, or small protein, that can target a specific pathogen without damaging the good bacteria that bolsters the immune system. (2021-01-06)

New imaging method reveals if antibiotics reach bacteria hiding in tissues
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and the University of Western Australia have developed a new imaging method to see where antibiotics have reached bacteria within tissues. The method could be used to help develop more effective antibiotic treatments, reducing the risk of antibiotic resistance. (2021-01-05)

Scientists turned toxic pesticide into treatment against antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Russian scientists from Kaliningrad and St. Petersburg have synthesized nitrogen-containing cyclic compounds that differ only in the relative position of side substituents. They are analogs of pesticides which are toxic and carcinogenic to humans, but the modifications allowed turning them into a powerful weapon against bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. (2020-12-29)

Johns Hopkins develops potential antibiotic for drug-resistant pathogen
Scientists from Johns Hopkins University and Medicine have developed a possible new antibiotic for a pathogen that is notoriously resistant to medications and frequently lethal for people with cystic fibrosis and other lung ailments. (2020-12-08)

Lung-on-chip provides new insight on body's response to early tuberculosis infection
Scientists have developed a lung-on-chip model to study how the body responds to early tuberculosis (TB) infection, according to findings published today in eLife. (2020-11-24)

Solving a mystery: How the TB bacterium develops rapid resistance to antibiotics
These slow growing bacteria have long puzzled TB researchers with their fairly rapid resistance to antibiotics. Researchers may have been barking up the wrong tree in exploring genetics, because the answer seems to lie in the epigenetic domain. (2020-11-18)

Tuberculosis screening needed for methotrexate users in at-risk locales
New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting, shows that tuberculosis (TB) screening and ongoing clinical care is needed for people on methotrexate who live in areas where the highly infectious illness is common. Methotrexate users who also take corticosteroids or other immunosuppressant therapies are at particular risk and need adequate TB screening. (2020-11-06)

Machine learning uncovers potential new TB drugs
Using a machine-learning approach that incorporates uncertainty, MIT researchers identified several promising compounds that target a protein required for the survival of the bacteria that cause tuberculosis. (2020-10-15)

COVID-19 rapid test has successful lab results, research moves to next stages
Rapid detection of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, in about 30 seconds following the test, has had successful preliminary results in Mano Misra's lab at the University of Nevada, Reno. The test uses a nanotube-based electrochemical biosensor, a similar technology that Misra has used in the past for detecting tuberculosis and colorectal cancer as well as detection of biomarkers for food safety (2020-10-14)

Successful Dartmouth TB vaccine moves forward after phase 2 trial
Results from the Phase 2 trial of the DAR-901 tuberculosis (TB) vaccine were announced today by investigators at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and published in the journal Vaccine. The three-year trial was conducted among 650 adolescents in Tanzania, a nation with high rates of TB infection, and showed that the vaccine was safe and induced immune responses against the disease. (2020-09-29)

Vaccination insights
While scientists race to develop and test a vaccine effective against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, recent studies have indicated that countries with widespread BCG vaccination appear to be weathering the pandemic better than their counterparts. This has led many researchers to suspect that BCG vaccine, which immunizes against tuberculosis, might offer protection against COVID-19. (2020-09-21)

World film premiere: Watch cell infected by tuberculosis die
Norwegian researchers have managed to show exactly how the tuberculosis bacterium kills its host cell by filming the process in detail for the first time. Every year, 1.5 million people die of TB. (2020-08-17)

Remains of 17th century bishop support neolithic emergence of tuberculosis
In a recent study published in Genome Biology, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Lund University and the Swedish Natural Historical Museum present analysis of the highest quality ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome to date, suggesting the pathogen is much younger than previously believed. (2020-08-14)

Significantly improved COVID-19 outcomes in countries with higher TB vaccination coverage
The researchers discovered that BCG regimes are associated with better COVID-19 outcomes, both in reducing infection rates and death rates per million, especially for ages 24 or younger who had received the vaccination in the last 15 years. There was no effect among older adults who had received the BCG vaccine. Many countries have stopped inoculating their entire population, but some still use BCG widely. (2020-08-12)

TB vaccine research could benefit the elderly and diabetics
A study of older mice with type 2 diabetes has yielded highly promising results for researchers investigating potential new vaccines for tuberculosis (TB). A team of researchers from Australia, Bangladesh and France investigated a potential vaccine, BCG::RD1, and found it highly protective when administered directly into the lungs of diabetic mice, which were then exposed to TB. (2020-08-10)

Research suggests greater access to specific HIV and tuberculosis medications is needed
A specific combination of HIV and TB treatments, difficult to obtain in certain parts of the world, decreased mortality risk for patients with HIV and multidrug-resistant TB. (2020-08-07)

BCG vaccine is safe and does not lead to an increased risk of COVID-19 symptoms
The BCG vaccine, an vaccine originally made against tuberculosis, has a general stimulating effect on the immune system and is therefore effective against multiple infectious diseases - possibly also against COVID-19. This study compared groups of volunteers who have received a BCG vaccine (or not) in the past five years (before the corona pandemic), showing that the vaccine is safe and possibly influences COVID-19 symptoms. (2020-08-06)

Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis
Scientists have discovered a new way of killing the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), using a toxin produced by the germ itself. (2020-07-29)

UCalgary researchers unlock new insights that could help with vaccine development
Researchers at the University of Calgary have unlocked new insights that may help with vaccine development for infectious diseases such as COVID-19, malaria, and tuberculosis. The findings show that rather than enhancing protection, a highly polarized cell-mediated response that was believed to be protective was, in fact, detrimental. These observations into the regulation of immunity against infectious diseases could provide a more holistic framework to design vaccines against those infections that don't have one. (2020-07-27)

Driving immunometabolism to control lung infection
When drugs to kill microbes are ineffective, host-directed therapy uses the body's own immune system to deal with the infection. This approach is being tested in patients with COVID-19, and now a team of researchers at Trinity College Dublin has published a study showing how it might also work in the fight against tuberculosis (TB). (2020-07-23)

Perspective: T cell responses to COVID-19 are a crucial target for research
While early research on the adaptive immune response to COVID-19 primarily looked at antibodies, more information is now emerging on how T cells react to the SARS-CoV-2 virus - addressing a crucial knowledge gap, say Daniel Altmann and Rosemary Boyton in a new Perspective. (2020-07-17)

An ISGlobal team develops an approach to facilitate the diagnosis of tuberculosis as cause of death
The approach, which combines a simple-to-use molecular test with the minimally invasive autopsy, could be a valuable tool in regions with high burden of the disease (2020-07-16)

Mouse model of contained tuberculosis infection could lead to a more effective vaccine
A novel mouse model of the protective effects of contained tuberculous infection could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine, according to a study published July 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Alan Diercks of Seattle Children's Research Institute, and colleagues. (2020-07-16)

International recommendations for nontuberculous mycobacteria
After 13 years, international Infectious Diseases and Respiratory Medicine societies have jointly issued new recommendations for the treatment of patients with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). Current recommendations for action are urgently needed, because in recent years the incidence of lung disease caused by NTMs has increased significantly in Germany and other European countries. Professor Christoph Lange from the Research Center Borstel and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) has been involved with the European Respiratory Society (ERS). (2020-07-13)

The Lancet Global Health: Modelling study predicts surge in HIV, TB, and malaria deaths due to COVID-19 pandemic
Some low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) could see HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and malaria deaths increase by as much as 10%, 20%, and 36% respectively over the next 5 years due to the disruption of health services caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and its response, according new modelling research published in The Lancet Global Health journal. (2020-07-13)

Preliminary study suggests tuberculosis vaccine may be limiting COVID-19 deaths
While a direct correlation between BCG vaccinations and a reduction in coronavirus mortalities still needs to be understood more fully, researchers hold hope that the BCG vaccine might be able to provide at least short-term protections against severe COVID-19, particularly for front-line medical workers or high-risk patients. (2020-07-08)

UTEP research reveals more about path bacterial pathogen travels to cause tuberculosis
Jianjun Sun, Ph.D., associate professor in UTEP's Department of Biological Sciences, led the research on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Sun's lab has been investigating the mechanisms of Mtb pathogenesis for more than 10 years at UTEP with a specific focus on EsxA, which is a virulence factor essential for Mtb virulence and a preferred target for developing novel anti-TB drugs and vaccines. (2020-06-30)

TB cases and deaths predicted to spike due to COVID-19
Study estimates at least 110,000 additional deaths from TB in China, India and South Africa unless health services maintained and strengthened. (2020-06-24)

Tuberculosis vaccine strengthens immune system
A tuberculosis vaccine developed 100 years ago also makes vaccinated persons less susceptible to other infections. While this effect has been recognized for a long time, it is not known what causes it. Together with colleagues from Australia and Denmark, researchers from Radboud university medical center the universities of Nijmegen and Bonn have now presented a possible answer to this question. (2020-06-15)

Tuberculosis spread from animals to humans may be greater than previously thought
The number of human tuberculosis (TB) cases that are due to transmission from animals, as opposed to human-to-human transmission, may be much higher than previously estimated, according to an international team of researchers. The results could have implications for epidemiological studies and public health interventions. (2020-06-15)

Together they stay alive longer
Hamburg/Borstel/Leipzig. The tuberculosis pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis can protect itself better when combined and thus stay alive longer in the air. This was the result of a study by the Leibniz Research Alliance INFECTIONS, which was published in the scientific journal ''Scientific Reports'' on Monday. (2020-06-12)

Tuberculosis: Discovery of an ancestral lineage in the African Great Lakes region
Two exceptional strains of tuberculosis, isolated from East African patients with multi-resistant forms of the disease have been discovered. Genome analyses show that this lineage originated from an ancestral phylum which predates the branching point shared by all other lineages of common tuberculosis strains known to date. This discovery reinforces the hypothesis of an East African origin for the tuberculosis bacillus and provides additional molecular clues about the evolution towards a pathogenic lifestyle. (2020-06-09)

How blocking iron drives the lung immune system to control infection
Scientists at Trinity College Dublin and St James's Hospital, Dublin have discovered how the iron chelator, DFX, which functions by attaching to iron, drives the immune system to deal with tuberculosis (TB). The findings have been published in the prestigious immunity journal, Frontiers in Immunology here: https://bit.ly/3dH6eix. (2020-05-13)

Researchers unlock TB vaccine puzzle in findings that could save millions of newborns
An international research team has identified the mechanism behind one of science's most enduring mysteries: what makes the 100-year-old tuberculosis (TB) vaccine so effective at preventing newborn deaths from diseases other than TB? (2020-05-06)

Scientists shed light on action of key tuberculosis drug
A new study led by scientists at the University of Birmingham has shed fresh light on how a key front-line drug kills the tuberculosis bacterium. (2020-04-23)

Scientists reveal how tuberculosis bacteria import vitamin B12 to grow
Researchers from Russia, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the US have revealed the structure of the protein responsible for vitamin B12 import into the cells of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis. (2020-04-22)

Restrictive healthcare policies associated with delayed TB diagnosis and treatment
The introduction of policies that restrict healthcare access for visitors and migrants not entitled to free NHS care may be associated with delays in diagnosis and treatment for patients with tuberculosis (TB) who were not born in the UK, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health. Delays in diagnosis and treatment of an infectious disease like TB may increase morbidity and mortality for infected individuals, as well as transmission in the community. (2020-04-20)

Rapid infectious disease shifts in Chinese children and adolescents prior to COVID-19
Deaths of children and adolescents in China due to infectious diseases were becoming rare prior to the covid-19 pandemic, according to a new study. (2020-04-03)

Blocking the iron transport could stop tuberculosis
The bacteria that cause tuberculosis need iron to survive. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now solved the first detailed structure of the transport protein responsible for the iron supply. When the iron transport into the bacteria is inhibited, the pathogen can no longer grow. This opens novel ways to develop targeted tuberculosis drugs. (2020-04-01)

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