Current Tumor Cells News and Events | Page 25

Current Tumor Cells News and Events, Tumor Cells News Articles.
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FEFU scientists obtained new compounds with potential antitumor effect from sea sponge
Chemists from Far Eastern Federal University's School of Natural Sciences (SNS FEFU) developed a new method to synthesize biologically active derivatives of fascaplysin -- cytotoxic pigment of a sea sponge. For the first time, they got a sufficient amount of 3-bromofascaplysin and 3,10-dibromofascaplysin, which were known before but were not available for study. Basing on these compounds, scientists synthesized 14-bromoreticulatate and 14-bromoreticulatine -- the derivatives of the reticulatine alkaloids. The resulting article is published in Marine Drugs. (2019-11-14)

Findings could identify aggressive breast cancers that will respond to immunotherapy
UNC Lineberger researchers discovered a biological signature that could help identify which triple negative breast cancers might respond to immunotherapy and other treatments. (2019-11-14)

Newly developed nanoparticles help fight lung cancer in animal model
Scientists have reported a new approach to treating lung cancer with inhaled nanoparticles developed at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health. (2019-11-14)

How self-reactive immune cells are allowed to develop
A research team at Lund University in Sweden has found the mechanism that controls the growth of B1-cells in mice. The findings, which may lead to a deeper understanding of certain forms of cancer and autoimmune diseases, was recently published in the journal Science Immunology. (2019-11-13)

Leukaemia cells can transform into non-cancerous cells through epigenetic changes
Researchers of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute discover that a leukaemic cell is capable of transforming into a non-cancerous cell through epigenetic changes. (2019-11-13)

Discovery: New biomarker for cancer stem cells
A University of Houston College of Pharmacy associate professor has discovered a new biomarker in cancer stem cells that govern cancer survival and spread, and it's raising hope that drug discovery to kill cancer stem cells could follow suit. (2019-11-13)

Anthrax may be the next tool in the fight against bladder cancer
Researchers at Purdue University have come up with a way to combine the anthrax toxin with a growth factor to kill bladder cancer cells and tumors. (2019-11-12)

Protein could offer therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer
A protein that drives growth of pancreatic cancer, and which could be a target for new treatments, has been identified by researchers at the Crick. (2019-11-12)

Getting cancer drugs to the brain is difficult -- but a new 'road map' might make it easie
Purdue University scientists have provided the first comprehensive characterization of both the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers in brain metastases of lung cancer, which will serve as a road map for treatment development. The work was recently published in Oncotarget. (2019-11-12)

Forget the Chardonay, pass me the grape stems! Anti-tumor activity in prostate cancer cells
Grape stems are discarded en masse during the production of wine. We love and produce a lot of wine in Nagano prefecture, and have been hoping to find a positive use for the previously discarded grape stems. Scientists at Shinshu University studied compounds within grape stem extracts and found significant anti-cancer activity on tumor cells. (2019-11-12)

UC research finds potential target for tumor-causing condition
University of Cincinnati researchers have found additional ways to target the molecular processes involved in activating a certain protein complex to potentially develop new therapies for a tumor-causing disorder. (2019-11-11)

Glutamine-blocking drug slows tumor growth and strengthens anti-tumor response
A compound developed by Johns Hopkins researchers that blocks glutamine metabolism can slow tumor growth, alter the tumor microenvironment and promote the production of durable and highly active anti-tumor T cells. (2019-11-08)

Oxygen-starved tumor cells have survival advantage that promotes cancer spread
Using cells from human breast cancers and mouse breast cancer models, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have significant new evidence that tumor cells exposed to low-oxygen conditions have an advantage when it comes to invading and surviving in the bloodstream. (2019-11-07)

Protein decoy stymies lung cancer growth in mice, Stanford-UCSF study finds
Scientists at Stanford and UC-San Francisco have developed an experimental drug that targets a currently untreatable type of lung cancer responsible for generating roughly 500,000 newly diagnosed cases worldwide each year. (2019-11-07)

New molecule reduces the aggressiveness of pediatric cancer
A microRNA inhibitor identified by researchers at the FAPESP-supported Human Genome and Stem Cell Research Center reduced the sizes of aggressive tumors and improved survival in mice. (2019-11-07)

Vitamin D dials down the aggression in melanoma cells
Vitamin D influences the behaviour of melanoma cells in the lab by making them less aggressive, Cancer Research UK scientists have found. The researchers discovered that vitamin D influences a signalling pathway within melanoma cells, which slowed down their growth and stopped them spreading to the lungs in mice. (2019-11-06)

Discovered a new process of antitumor response of NK cells in myeloma
The stem cell transplant and cell immunotherapy group of the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute reveals how NK cells activate a set of actions that promote their antitumor capacity in the presence of myeloma cells. (2019-11-05)

Cancer metastasis: tumor plasticity counts
Publication in Cell Reports: Researchers at the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) uncover the importance of tumor plasticity for cancer metastasis. They provide evidence that tumor cells undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition during the metastatic process initiation, and mesenchymal to epithelial transition also at the metastatic site. (2019-11-05)

Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant meso
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system. (2019-11-05)

Marker reveals if benign-appearing meningiomas are perilous
A modified protein in benign-appearing meningiomas can reveal which are truly benign and which are more dangerous and require more aggressive treatment, researchers have discovered. The article was published by Clinical Cancer Research. Postdoctoral candidate Carolina Angelica Parada with the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine is the paper's lead author. (2019-11-05)

Scientists identify protein that promotes brain metastasis
A protein that breast, lung and other cancers use to promote their spread -- or metastasis -- to the brain, has been identified by a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and New York-Presbyterian investigators. The protein, CEMIP, will now be a focus of efforts to predict, prevent and treat brain metastases, which are a frequent cause of cancer deaths. (2019-11-04)

Eye on research: A new way to detect and study retinoblastoma
Dr. Jesse Berry of Children's Hospital Los Angeles advances the field of retinoblastoma research through her discovery and use of aqueous humor biopsy. She has found that genetic tumor information not present in the blood can be detected in this fluid from the eye. (2019-11-04)

Moffitt researchers identify a mechanism controlling tumor cell recognition by immune cells
Immunotherapy has become a standard treatment approach for several types of cancer, including melanoma. However, tumors can escape immune cell detection even with the use of immunotherapies. In a new study published in Cancer Immunology Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with the University of Miami's Miller School of Medicine, describe a cellular mechanism that controls tumor cell recognition by immune cells. (2019-11-01)

Estrogen's opposing effects on mammary tumors in dogs
Estrogen's role in canine mammary cancer is more complex than previously understood, according to new research led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. The nuanced findings may help explain why dogs spayed at a young age are more likely to develop more aggressive cancers, the team says. (2019-11-01)

Discovery of 'cellular bike couriers' clue to disease spreading
A previously unknown component of our cells that delivers proteins like a bike courier in heavy traffic could shed light on the mechanisms that allow cells to spread in diseases such as cancer. (2019-10-31)

Milk from teeth: Dental stem cells can generate milk-producing cells
Stem cells of the teeth can contribute to the regeneration of non-dental organs, namely mammary glands. According to a new study from researchers at the University of Zurich, dental epithelial stem cells from mice can generate mammary ducts and even milk-producing cells when transplanted into mammary glands. This could be used for post-surgery tissue regeneration in breast cancer patients. (2019-10-31)

Dynamic transition of the blood-brain barrier in the development of non-small cell lung cancer brain
Effective drug delivery through the BTB is one of the greatest therapeutic obstacles in treating brain metastases. Using an experimental model, the researchers defined key changes within the BTB and the BBB in the brain around the tumor region over time. These data provide a comprehensive analysis of the BTB in NSCLC brain metastasis. (2019-10-31)

Kidney cancer study uncovers new subtypes and clues to better diagnosis and treatment
In what is believed to be the most comprehensive molecular characterization to date of the most common -- and often treatment-resistant -- form of kidney cancer, researchers at Johns Hopkins' departments of pathology and oncology, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine report evidence for at least three distinct subtypes of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), along with new revelations about the proteins that define them. Their findings could inform overall patient survival and response to treatment. (2019-10-31)

Enter the exosome: WVU researcher studies how cancer and immune cells communicate
David Klinke, a researcher with the West Virginia University School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, is deciphering the contents of exosomes that cancer cells release. Studying the information exosomes contain and how they influence other cells may suggest new targets for cancer immunotherapy. (2019-10-30)

Tumors turn gut 'brain cells' into tumor growth promoters
When enteric glial cells are exposed to secretions from colon tumors, the glial cells convert into promoters of tumor growth. The work demonstrates enteric glial cells' importance in the tumor microenvironment and could lead to new targets for treatment of colon cancer. (2019-10-30)

Scientists discover the implication of a new protein involved in liver cancer
Scientists discover the implication of a new protein involved in liver cancer. The finding has a clear clinical relevance, since it will facilitate patient selection to offer a more specific therapy. (2019-10-29)

MIB2 enhances inflammation by degradation of CYLD
A team of researchers at Ehime University revealed that E3 ubiquitin ligase MIB2 enhances inflammation by degrading the deubiquitinating enzyme CYLD. This finding was published on Sept. 20 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (2019-10-29)

New method identifies aggressive breast cancer
Aggressive forms of breast cancer often manipulate the immune response in their favor. This manipulation is revealed in humans by the same immunological 'signature' as in mice. This is shown by a study carried out by scientists from the University of Bonn together with Dutch colleagues. Their method makes it possible to obtain an indication of the prognosis of the disease using patients' tumor tissue. The results are published in the journal Cell Reports. (2019-10-29)

Implantable cancer traps could provide earlier diagnosis, help monitor treatment
Invasive procedures to biopsy tissue from cancer-tainted organs could be replaced by simply taking samples from a tiny 'decoy' implanted just beneath the skin, University of Michigan researchers have demonstrated in mice. (2019-10-29)

Pediatric cancers: Why some forms of leukemia only affect children
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mainly affects children, with the prognosis often being poor despite several decades of research into more effective treatments. A new study explains why some forms of leukemia develop in very young children and identifies therapeutic targets. (2019-10-29)

3D-printed device finds 'needle in a haystack' cancer cells by removing the hay
Finding a handful of cancer cells hiding among billions of blood cells in a patient sample can be like finding a needle in a haystack. In a new approach enabled by 3D-printed cell traps, researchers are removing the hay to expose the cancer cells. (2019-10-27)

Immune system upgrade
Theoretically, our immune system could detect and kill cancer cells. Unfortunately, tumors are well armed to fight these attacks. Despite modern cancer treatments, metastases and relapses remain a major problem. Increasing anti-tumor immunity might now be made possible, thanks to copper telluride nanoparticles that mimic enzymes, especially under NIR-II light irradiation. This induces oxidative stress in tumor cells, quashing their immunosuppressive status and triggering inflammatory processes, as Chinese scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2019-10-25)

Pediatric cancer study shows usefulness of gene expression analysis
Analyzing gene expression in tumor cells from children with cancer is more likely to reveal targets for therapy than analysis of DNA mutations, according to a new study led by researchers at the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute. The study looked at 144 tumor samples from 128 pediatric cancer patients enrolled in four precision medicine clinical studies in the United States and Canada. (2019-10-25)

CRISPR-edited C. elegans identifies vulnerabilities in cancer
A group of researchers led by Dr Julián Cerón of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), has mimicked the SF3B1 mutations found in tumor in C. elegans, (2019-10-24)

Scientists reveal novel oncogenic driver gene in human gastrointestinal stromal tumors
A team led by Prof. WANG Yuexiang of the Shanghai Institute of Nutrition and Health (SINH) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with Prof. Jonathan Fletcher from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, described a novel druggable driver gene in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). (2019-10-24)

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