Current Tumor Growth News and Events | Page 24

Current Tumor Growth News and Events, Tumor Growth News Articles.
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Patterns of chronic lymphocytic leukemia growth identified
In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the rate of disease growth is apt to follow one of three trajectories: relentlessly upward, steadily level, or something in between, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the University of Washington report in a new study published in Nature. (2019-05-29)

Snowflakes inform scientists how tooth enamel is formed
Physicists and mathematicians use the classical Stefan problem to explain the principles of crystal formation, such as snowflakes . Researchers in the University of Helsinki and Aalto University have now adapted the same principles to explain how tooth enamel gets distributed over the crown during growth. (2019-05-29)

New study reveals an unexpected survival mechanism of a subset of cancer cells
A research group led by Claus M. Azzalin at iMM has discovered that a human enzyme named FANCM is absolutely required for the survival of ALT tumor cells. The results were now published in the open access journal Nature Communications. Future strategies targeting the activity of this molecule in ALT tumor cells can constitute the basis of a novel therapeutic protocol for the treatment of these tumors. (2019-05-28)

New evidence supports surgery for rare type of brain lymphoma
Through a systematic review of published studies going back 50 years, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have identified a distinct subtype of primary central nervous system (PCNS) lymphoma that should be considered for surgical removal, suggesting a major shift in how this type of tumor is evaluated and managed. (2019-05-28)

Researchers advance search for laboratory test to predict spread of breast cancer
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University and other institutions report that a new laboratory test that induces cancer cells to squeeze through narrow spaces has the potential to accurately predict which breast cancers and other solid tumors are likely to spread, or metastasize, to other sites. The test, they say, might also help clinicians select the best drugs to prevent cancer's spread. (2019-05-28)

Researchers identified novel oncogenic function for receptor linked to Alzheimer's disease
Common and rare SORLA single nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. So far, SORLA has been mainly studied in neurons, but the new study focused on SORLA's role in cancer cells. Led by Academy Professor Johanna Ivaska, researchers from the University of Turku in Finland observed that SORLA was highly expressed in HER2 positive cancers. Removing SORLA from cancer cells severely impaired the oncogenic fitness of HER2 positive cancers. (2019-05-28)

The message that addiction is a disease makes substance users less likely to seek help
Research finds that people with substance-use problems who read a message describing addiction as a disease are less likely to report wanting to engage in effective therapies, compared to those who read a message that addiction behaviors are subject to change. The finding could inform future public and interpersonal communication efforts regarding addiction. (2019-05-28)

Computer-assisted diagnostic procedure enables earlier detection of brain tumor growth
A computer-assisted diagnostic procedure helps physicians detect the growth of low-grade brain tumors earlier and at smaller volumes than visual comparison alone, according to a study published May 28 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Hassan Fathallah-Shaykh of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues. However, additional clinical studies are needed to determine whether early therapeutic interventions enabled by early tumor growth detection prolong survival times and improve quality of life. (2019-05-28)

Study finds how prostate cancer cells mimic bone when they metastasize
In a study published online Tuesday in the journal PLOS ONE, Duke Cancer Institute researchers describe how prostate cancer cells develop the ability to mimic bone-forming cells called osteoblasts, enabling them to proliferate in the bone microenvironment. (2019-05-28)

New study dismisses green growth policies as a route out of ecological emergency
The new study examines green growth policies as articulated in major reports by the World Bank, the OECD and the UN Environment Programme, and tests the theory against extant empirical evidence and models of the relationship between GDP and both material footprint and CO2 emissions. (2019-05-27)

PSA, a prostate cancer marker, activates vascular and lymphangiogenic growth factors
A new study indicates that PSA, a prostate cancer marker, is one of the catalysts that activate vascular endothelial and lymphangiogenic growth factors which contribute to the spread of cancer. (2019-05-24)

Cancer cells are quick-change artists adapting to their environment
Until now, researchers have assumed that the growth of solid tumors originates from cancer stem cells characterized by specific surface markers, which develop in a fixed, hierarchical order. In a joint interdisciplinary project led by the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH), researchers now show that cancer cells of glioblastomas -- conspicuously aggressive solid brain tumors -- manifest developmental plasticity and their phenotypic characteristics are less constrained than believed. (2019-05-24)

New leaf shapes for thale cress
Max Planck researchers equip the plant with pinnate leaves. (2019-05-23)

How molecular escorts help prevent cancer
The anti-tumor protein p53 can decide on the life or death of a cell: If it detects damage in the cell's genome, the protein pushes the cell to suicide. New research conducted at Technical University of Munich (TUM) shows that this inborn cancer prevention only works when special proteins, known as chaperones, allow it to take place. (2019-05-21)

Scientists discover potential breakthrough in the understanding of tumor dormancy
Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center may have uncovered a primary method through which cancer cells exist undetected in an organism and received more than $1 million to investigate the potential for novel therapeutics that target and destroy cells in a specific state of tumor dormancy. (2019-05-21)

Shedding light on cancer metabolism in real-time with bioluminescence
Cancerous tumors can be made to bioluminesce, like fireflies, according to the level of their glucose uptake, giving rise to a technique for quantifying metabolite absorption. The firefly imaging technique for sugar can be translated from cancer to many other metabolic diseases. (2019-05-20)

Protein that hinders advancement of prostate cancer identified
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that blocking a specific protein, may be a promising strategy to prevent the spread of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). (2019-05-20)

Human capital benefits of military boost economy by billions
A recent study finds that US government spending on military personnel has a positive impact on the nation's human capital -- essentially improving the American workforce. The study estimates the economic impact of this human capital improvement to be $89.8 billion for 2019 alone. (2019-05-17)

Cancer drugs promote stem cell properties of colorectal cancer
Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) and the Mannheim University Medical Center have now discovered that a certain group of cancer drugs (MEK Inhibitors) activates the cancer-promoting Wnt signalling pathway in colorectal cancer cells. This can lead to the accumulation of tumor cells with stem cell characteristics that are resistant to many therapies and can lead to relapses. The researchers thus provide a possible explanation for why these drugs are not effective in colorectal cancer. (2019-05-16)

Natural compound found in broccoli reawakens the function of potent tumor suppressor
Long associated with decreased risk of cancer, broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables -- the family of plants that also includes cauliflower, cabbage, collard greens, Brussels sprouts and kale -- contain a molecule that inactivates a gene known to play a role in a variety of common human cancers. A new study demonstrates that targeting the gene, known as WWP1, with the ingredient found in broccoli suppressed tumor growth in cancer-prone lab animals. (2019-05-16)

Big data helps identify better way to research breast cancer's spread
Michigan State University researchers are analyzing large volumes of data, often referred to as big data, to determine better research models to fight the spread of breast cancer and test potential drugs. Current models used in the lab frequently involve culturing cells on flat dishes, or cell lines, to model tumor growth in patients. (2019-05-15)

Enhanced anticancer compound may allow precise activation and tracking of treatment
Wistar and University of South Florida researchers have advanced a novel compound that specifically targets the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response that is frequently hyperactivated in cancer and promotes survival of cancer cells during stressful conditions. (2019-05-15)

New strategy of reprogramming regulatory T cells may improve cancer therapies
Therapies that harness the power of the immune system against cancer have made remarkable progress against certain tumors but still remain ineffective in most cancer patients. A new study from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases describes a method of reprogramming regulatory T cells that usually suppress immune responses into inflammatory cells that not only permit but also intensify an antitumor immune response. (2019-05-15)

Blood test can measure effectiveness of treatments for aggressive skin cancers
Blood tests that track the amount of tumor DNA can -- after only one month of drug therapy -- detect how well treatment is working in patients with skin cancer, a new study finds. (2019-05-15)

Family dynamics: Molecules from the same family have different effects in cancer prognosis
Researchers at Hiroshima University have found that different levels of two molecules of the same family -- TIMP-1 and TIMP-4 -- can influence prognosis of liposarcoma. (2019-05-13)

Radioisotope couple for tumor diagnosis and therapy
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Omega a promising combination of radioisotope-carrying molecules for use in radiotheranostics -- a diagnosis-and-treatment approach based on the combination of medical imaging and internal radiation therapy with radioactive elements. (2019-05-13)

Bone cells suppress cancer metastases
A subpopulation of bone cells releases factors that can halt the growth of breast cancer that's traveled to the bone, putting the cells in stasis. (2019-05-13)

How to starve triple negative breast cancer
A team of Brazilian researchers has developed a strategy that slows the growth of triple negative breast cancer cells by cutting them off from two major food sources. (2019-05-13)

Collagen fibres grow like a sunflower
In a new study published in EPJ E, two researchers at the Universite Paris-sud in Orsay, France, examine the patterns developed by collagen fibers, found in the tissues of virtually all animals. What is fascinating about the process is that one step in the fibers' formation is similar to the growth of sunflower petals. (2019-05-13)

Autophagy in dendritic cells helps anticancer activity
Autophagy contributes to the homeostasis of a cell and recently another function of autophagy has been reported. A KAIST research team found that the autophagy of dendritic cells supports T-cell anticancer activity. (2019-05-12)

Biomarker may help identify men with prostate cancer at greater risk of tumor metastasis
Ten percent of patients with prostate cancer develop locally invasive and metastatic disease, which increases the severity of the disease and likelihood of death and limits treatment options. A report in The American Journal of Pathology indicates that a significantly lower presence of syntaphilin (SNPH) -- a mitochondrial protein -- within the tumor's central core versus at the tumor's invasive outer edge, may identify patients at increased risk of metastasis. These patients may require more rigorous testing, surveillance, and treatment. (2019-05-09)

Study shows MD Anderson-developed drug effective in overcoming ibrutinib resistance in mantle cell lymphona
A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center demonstrated how a small molecule drug discovered at the institution may help overcome resistance to treatment with ibrutinib in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. (2019-05-08)

'Google Maps' for cancer: Image-based computer model reveals finer details of tumor blood flow
Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have developed something akin to a 'Google Maps' approach for more accurately computing and visualizing the structural and functional blood vessel changes needed for tumor growth. By pairing high-quality 3D imaging data of tumor specimens from animal models with sophisticated mathematical formulas, the researchers say they now have a model that accurately represents blood traffic inside tumors, including the complex blood flow, oxygenation and structural changes that occur. (2019-05-06)

New computational tool enables powerful molecular analysis of biomedical tissue samples
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine invented a computational technique called CIBERSORTx that can analyze the RNA of individual cells taken from whole-tissue samples or data sets. (2019-05-06)

Untangling a cancer signaling network suggests new roadmap to tumor control
In this advanced age of molecular sleuthing, a research team led by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center have findings that suggest tumors will eventually become resistant to drug inhibitors of a common cancer pathway (dubbed YAP/TAZ), now in preclinical development. But in the same study, published in Developmental Cell, they posit that pairing those inhibitors with another drug, now on the market, may deliver that desired fatal blow. (2019-05-06)

A barrier that keeps cancer at bay
Scientists at EPFL have discovered a biological 'barrier' that prevents cancer cells from forming new tumors and more importantly, from metastasizing. The study examines pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and breast cancer. (2019-05-06)

Low-cost intervention boosts undergraduate interest in computer science
A recent study finds that an online intervention taking less than 30 minutes significantly increased interest in computer science for both male and female undergraduate students. However, when it comes to the intervention's impact on classroom performance, the picture gets more complicated. (2019-05-06)

Russian scientists developed a system for malignant brain tumors diagnosing during surgery
Scientists of the Research Medical University of Volga region and the Institute of Applied Physics, RAS have developed a system for malignant brain tumors diagnosing during surgery. The method is based on optical coherence tomography (OCT). Doctors obtained images of brain tissue that clearly show the differences between malignant and healthy cells. The method simplifies tumor removal operations and makes them more effective.The results were published in Frontiers in Oncology. (2019-05-06)

A new approach to targeting tumors and tracking their spread
MIT researchers have developed nanosized antibodies that home in on the meshwork of proteins surrounding cancer cells. This approach could be track tumors as they grow, metastasize or respond to treatment, or as a way to deliver cancer drugs. (2019-05-06)

Obesity reprograms immune cells in breasts to promote tumor formation
Macrophages in adipose tissue (fat) link obesity to triple-negative breast cancer. Instead of fighting breast cancer, these immune cells actually promote it. (2019-05-06)

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