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Current Ulcerative Colitis News and Events, Ulcerative Colitis News Articles.
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ASCRS issues updated guidelines on surgery for Crohn's disease
Although rates of surgery for Crohn's disease have decreased over the years, many patients still require surgical treatment - due to inadequate responses to medical therapy, severe attacks of acute colitis, and many other situations. Reflecting the latest research evidence and clinical practice, an updated set of recommendations for surgery in patients with Crohn's disease have been published in Diseases of the Colon & Rectum (DC&R), the official journal of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS). (2020-07-23)

Chronic inflammation alters the evolution of cells in the colon, study finds
Researchers have compared diseased colon with healthy tissue to better understand how inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is linked to an increased risk of colorectal cancers, at a molecular level. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators found that the rate of DNA change within colon cells affected by IBD was more than double that in healthy colon, increasing the likelihood of these cells gaining DNA changes that could lead to cancer. (2020-07-21)

How to repair your gut
In a world first, Monash University researchers have identified a key biomolecule that enhances the repair of your gut lining by prompting stem cells to regenerate damaged tissue. (2020-07-20)

Fighting E. coli with E. coli
According to findings published this week in mBio, Nissle, a strain of Escherichia coli, is harmless to intestinal tissue and may protect the gut from enterohemorrhagic E. coli, a pathogen that produces Shiga toxin. (2020-07-07)

Gut Piezo1 regulates gut and bone homeostasis via RNA sensing.
Gut enterochromaffin cells regulate gut and bone homeostasis via serotonin production. A recent report suggested that gut microbes regulate serotonin levels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unexplored. Here, Piezo1 is reported to be crucial for serotonin production from gut. Researchers discovered that bacterial derived RNA could activate Piezo1, leading to the production of serotonin from enterochromaffin cells, and that the RNA-Piezo1 axis could be an important target for treatment of bone and gut disorders. (2020-07-07)

Location, location, location -- Even gut immune response is site-specific
Researchers at W├╝rzburg University are using mini-organs to model the digestive tract in the laboratory. These so-called organoids provide insights into the inflammatory processes that play a role in diseases such Crohn's and ulcerative colitis. (2020-07-03)

Vitamin D may help prevent a common side effect of anti-cancer immunotherapy
New research published in CANCER indicates that taking vitamin D supplements may help prevent a potentially serious side effect of a revolutionary form of anti-cancer therapy. (2020-06-22)

Could the cure for IBD be inside your mouth?
A new collaborative study from the U-M Medical and Dental Schools reveals that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be the latest condition made worse by poor oral health via a clash between the mouth and gut microbiomes. (2020-06-16)

Endogenous insulin production is preserved in Type 1 diabetes with anti-TNF drug
A study led by a UB researcher found that a drug called golimumab preserved beta-cell function in children and young adults with newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes, according to findings from a Phase 2 study. (2020-06-16)

AGA does not recommend the use of probiotics for most digestive conditions
After a detailed review of available literature, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) has released new clinical guidelines finding that for most digestive conditions there is not enough evidence to support the use of probiotics. This is the first clinical guideline to focus on probiotics across multiple GI diseases while also considering the effect of each single-strain or multi-strain formulation of probiotics independently instead of grouping them all under the single umbrella of 'probiotics.' These guidelines are published in Gastroenterology, AGA's official journal. (2020-06-09)

Yes, inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease are linked
A systematic review and meta-analysis that has determined there is a nine-fold increased risk of having IBD for patients with a previous diagnosis of celiac disease. Similarly, the risk for celiac disease is increased in IBD patients, though to a smaller extent. (2020-05-13)

Uncovering how 'dark matter' regions of the genome affect inflammatory diseases
A study led by researchers at the Babraham Institute in collaboration with the Wellcome Sanger Institute has uncovered how variations in a non-protein coding 'dark matter' region of the genome could make patients susceptible to complex autoimmune and allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease. Published in the leading scientific journal Nature, the research identifies a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. (2020-05-13)

Peptides that can be taken as a pill
Peptides represent a billion-dollar market in the pharmaceutical industry, but they can generally only be taken as injections to avoid degradation by stomach enzymes. Scientists at EPFL have now developed a method to generate peptides that resist enzymatic degradation and can be taken orally. (2020-05-11)

Management of inflammatory bowel diseases: Clinical perspectives
In a new special issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), leading international experts provide a comprehensive update on the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) for the practicing clinician (2020-05-06)

Researchers find certain foods common in diets of US adults with inflammatory bowel disease
Foods, such as French fries, cheese, cookies, soda, and sports and energy drinks, are commonly found in the diets of United States adults with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a new study by researchers in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2020-05-06)

AGA releases official guidance for patients with IBD during the COVID-19 pandemic
Today, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) published new COVID-19 guidance for gastroenterologists treating patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD): AGA Clinical Practice Update on Management of Inflammatory Bowel Disease During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Expert Commentary. (2020-04-10)

Researchers reveal important genetic mechanism behind inflammatory bowel disease
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have pinpointed a genetic variation responsible for driving the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The genetic pathway associated with this variation is involved in other immune disorders, suggesting the mechanism they identified could serve as an important therapeutic target. (2020-04-09)

The effects of inflammatory bowel disease on pregnancy
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) -- including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis -- often affects women of childbearing age. A study published in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics compared the health of pregnant and non-pregnant women with IBD. (2020-04-08)

Unearthing gut secret paves way for targeted treatments
Scientists have identified a specific type of sensory nerve ending in the gut and how these communicate pain or discomfort to the brain, paving the way for targeted treatments for common conditions like ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome or chronic constipation. While understanding of the gut's neurosensory abilities has grown rapidly, two great mysteries have been where and how different types of sensory nerve endings in the gut lie. (2020-03-29)

Gut enzyme IAP found to prevent aging and frailty in animal models
Studying mice and fruitflies, researchers found that the enzyme intestinal alkaline phosphotase helped prevent intestinal permeability and gut-derived systemic inflammation, resulting in less frailty and extended life span. (2020-03-26)

Mount Sinai researchers unveil mechanisms to prevent Crohn's disease
In a series of four studies published today in Gastroenterology, a journal of the American Gastroenterological Association, Mount Sinai inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) researchers, describe the identification of predictive tools and a new understanding of environmental factors that trigger IBD. (2020-03-26)

But you don't look sick? How broad categories like autoimmune impact patient experience
Patients with autoimmune diseases often have an illness experience riddled with symptom ambiguities and shifting diagnoses. A new Drexel University study found that one way patients and physicians can work through the difficulty and frustration of communicating about these conditions is to use both broad diagnostic terms, like 'autoimmune disease,' as well as narrow ones, such as 'lupus or MS.' (2020-03-24)

Using 'organs-on-a-chip' to model complicated diseases
MIT biological engineers have created a multitissue model that lets them study the relationships between different organs and the immune system on a microfluidic chip seeded with human cells. With this 'organs-on-a-chip' model, they could explore the role of immune cells in ulcerative colitis and other inflammatory diseases. (2020-03-18)

Fecal microbiota transplants successfully treat patients with C. diff
A new study from the University of Birmingham has shown that fecal microbiota rransplants (FMT) are highly successful in treating patients with Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) infection. (2020-03-15)

Immunosuppressive therapy for inflammatory bowel disease does not increase women's risk of vulvar or vaginal cancer
In a new retrospective study, researchers found that the use of immunosuppressive therapy does not increase the occurrence or recurrence of vulvar or vaginal cancer in women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, earlier onset of cancer was reported, and lymphomas were found in some patients, which is very rare in the genital tract. Their results appear in Digestive and Liver Disease, published by Elsevier. (2020-03-11)

Aging and nutrients competition determine changes in microbiota
Two studies with surprising discoveries: in the elderly, the bacterium E. coli evolves in a way that can become potentially pathogenic and increase the risk of disease and, according to data obtained in another study, the metabolism of the same bacterium present in the microbiota evolves differently if it is alone or accompanied by other bacteria. (2020-03-11)

Gut bacteria can penetrate tumors and aid cancer therapy, study suggests
Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and University of Chicago have discovered that bacteria that usually live in the gut can accumulate in tumors and improve the effectiveness of immunotherapy in mice. The study, which will be published March 6 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that treating cancer patients with Bifidobacteria might boost their response to CD47 immunotherapy, a wide-ranging anti-cancer treatment that is currently being evaluated in several clinical trials. (2020-03-06)

Using artificial intelligence to assess ulcerative colitis
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have developed an artificial intelligence system with a deep neural network that can effectively evaluate endoscopic data from patients with ulcerative colitis, which is a type of inflammatory bowel disease, without the need for biopsy collection. The system was able to identify patients in both endoscopic remission and histologic remission with comparable accuracy to experts, representing a gain in terms of efficiency and costs. (2020-03-05)

Radiation therapy for colon cancer works better when specific protein blocked
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a way to make radiation therapy for colorectal cancer more effective by inhibiting a protein found in cancer cells in the gut. (2020-03-03)

Immunology: Tonsils as a testbed
Biomedical researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have isolated immune cells from human tonsils obtained following routine surgery, and used them to analyze aspects of the immune response and test the effects of anti-inflammatory agents at the cellular level. (2020-02-28)

Stanford scientists link ulcerative colitis to missing gut microbes
About 1 million people in the United States have ulcerative colitis, a serious disease of the colon that has no cure and whose cause is obscure. Now, a study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators has tied the condition to a missing microbe. (2020-02-25)

Gut bacteria's interactions with immune system mapped
The first detailed cell atlas of the immune cells and gut bacteria within the human colon has been created. The study from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators revealed different immune niches, showing changes in the bacterial microbiome and immune cells throughout the colon. (2020-02-17)

What would it take to make FMT mainstream? Two publications consider the opportunities
Fecal microbiota transplant treatment for most microbiome-associated diseases has not been rigorously studied in humans--and any such studies would be subject to regulation by the Food and Drug Administration. In a pair of forums publishing February 12 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, clinicians and an FDA scientist detail some areas of FMT research that could facilitate the development of safe and effective FMT therapies for patients. (2020-02-12)

IDIBELL researchers discover that a molecule of blood is effective against autoimmune kidney disease
A research team from IDIBELL identifies C3BP (beta-) as a potential treatment for lupidic nephritis in an animal model. (2020-02-03)

Got slime? Using regenerative biology to restore mucus production
Mucus production is essential to health, and an imbalance can be life-threatening. Doctors and medical researchers have long sought the origins of goblet cells and have been eager to control processes that regenerate them and maintain balanced populations. Pitt bioengineer Lance Davidson published an article in Nature Communications that reveals that tissue mechanics can drive the regeneration of mucus-producing goblet cells on the outside surface of frog embryonic organoids. (2020-01-31)

5 major advances in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment
Summary of five impactful studies to be presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress, a partnership of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation and the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA). (2020-01-23)

Reducing dangerous swelling in traumatic brain injury
After a traumatic brain injury (TBI), the most harmful damage is caused by secondary swelling of the brain compressed inside the skull. There is no treatment. In new research, scientists significantly reduced brain swelling and damage after a TBI by injecting nanoparticles into the bloodstream within two hours after the injury in a preclinical study. 'We believe this may provide the first real treatment for people with TBI,' the senior author, a neurologist, said. (2020-01-22)

Sticky antibiotic provides glue for successful treatment
Researchers have found how an antibiotic used to treat a debilitating gut infection stays put inside the body giving it time to effectively treat the problem, a discovery that will pave the way for the development of more effective antibiotic treatments to fight superbugs. (2020-01-22)

Researchers identify a possible cause and treatment for inflammatory bowel disease
In a study published online in PNAS on Jan. 20, 2020, Prof. SUN Bing's team from the Center for Excellence in Molecular and Cellular Science, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. LIU Jie from Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, revealed a new mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of IBD and suggested therapeutic targets for clinical trial. (2020-01-21)

New AGA guideline outlines treatment best practices for ulcerative colitis patients
An increasing number of drugs are available for long-term management of moderate to severe UC, leading to questions about treatment strategies for optimal patient care. A new clinical guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association, published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the AGA Institute, provides recommendations for the management of adult outpatients with moderate to severe UC as well as adult hospitalized patients with acute severe ulcerative colitis (ASUC). (2020-01-21)

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