Current Ultrasound News and Events

Current Ultrasound News and Events, Ultrasound News Articles.
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Scientists jump-start two people's brains after coma
In 2016, a team led by UCLA's Martin Monti reported that a 25-year-old man recovering from a coma had made remarkable progress following a treatment to jump-start his brain using ultrasound. Now, Monti and colleagues report that two more patients with severe brain injuries have also made impressive progress thanks to the same technique. (2021-01-27)

Drug-delivery microcapsules tagged with zirconium-89 can be tracked by PET imaging
Polymer and radionuclide chemists report major advance in microcapsule drug delivery systems. Their microcapsules -- labeled with radioactive zirconium-89 -- are the first example of hollow polymer capsules capable of long-term, multiday positron emission tomography imaging in vivo. In previous work, the researchers showed that the hollow capsules could be filled with a potent dose of the cancer drug doxorubicin, which could then be released by therapeutic ultrasound that ruptures the microcapsules. (2021-01-20)

Nonsurgical treatment for cerebral infarction using wearable wireless ultrasound devices
Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) announced that the research team at the Center for Bionics, led by Dr. Kim Hyungmin, developed a wireless rehabilitation treatment technology for brain nervous system damaged by a stroke by fabricating a wearable, wireless low-intensity focused ultrasound brain stimulator. Additionally, to verify its effectiveness, this brain stimulator was applied to animal models of stroke. (2021-01-19)

RUDN University and RLT scientists: Light, magnetic field, and ultrasound could help fight COVID-19
A team of researchers from RUDN University and RLT suggested restoring normal levels of lymphocytes in patients with COVID-19 and other viral diseases by subjecting them to the combined influence of light, magnetic field, and ultrasound. (2021-01-18)

Is your skin thirsty? Optoacoustic sensor measures water content in living tissue
Researchers from Skoltech and the University of Texas Medical Branch (US) have shown how optoacoustics can be used for monitoring skin water content, a technique which is promising for medical applications such as tissue trauma management and in cosmetology. (2021-01-15)

Singing a tumor test song
Singing may be the next-generation, noninvasive approach to determining the health of a patient's thyroid. When a person sings, the vibrations create waves in the tissue near the vocal tract called shear waves. If a tumor is present in the thyroid, the elasticity of its surrounding tissue increases, stiffening, and causing the shear waves to accelerate. Using ultrasound imaging to measure these waves, researchers can determine the elasticity of the thyroid tissue. (2021-01-12)

Focused ultrasound shows promise for Parkinson's disease
A scalpel-free alternative to brain surgery has the potential to benefit people with Parkinson's disease symptoms that are much more severe on one side of the body, new research suggests. (2021-01-07)

Nanodroplets and ultrasound 'drills' prove effective at tackling tough blood clots
Engineering researchers have developed a new technique for eliminating particularly tough blood clots, using engineered nanodroplets and an ultrasound ''drill'' to break up the clots from the inside out. The technique has not yet gone through clinical testing. In vitro testing has shown promising results. (2021-01-07)

'Virtual biopsies' could replace tissue biopsies in future thanks to new technique
A new advanced computing technique using routine medical scans to enable doctors to take fewer, more accurate tumour biopsies, has been developed by cancer researchers at the University of Cambridge. This is an important step towards precision tissue sampling for cancer patients to help select the best treatment. In future the technique could even replace clinical biopsies with 'virtual biopsies', sparing patients invasive procedures. (2021-01-06)

Perfect transmission through barrier using sound
A research team led by Professor Xiang Zhang, President of the University of Hong Kong (HKU) when he was a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, (UC Berkeley) has for the first time experimentally proved a century old quantum theory that relativistic particles can pass through a barrier with 100% transmission. (2020-12-23)

Lithuanian researchers propose combination of methods to improve anticancer drug delivery
Application of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in combination with microbubbles might enhance the delivery of chemotherapy medication used for treating cancers. In their study, a team of Lithuanian researchers from three universities - KTU, LSMU and VMU - claim that the rate of microbubble survival time is the best indicator for determining the efficiency of sonoporation, i.e. ultrasound-induced laceration of the cancer cell membrane. (2020-12-17)

A first-in-human clinical trial shows microbubbles augments radiation in liver cancer patients
Bursting gas-filled microbubbles using ultrasound waves sensitizes tumors to targeted radiation, reducing tumor growth and improving overall survival after treatment. (2020-12-15)

Lung ultrasounds could help determine COVID-19 outcome
Researchers have developed a method using ultrasound imaging to score a patient's lung health, which may help predict if a patient with COVID-19 will worsen. Using 14 points in the lungs, they looked for abnormalities and assigned each spot a score out of 3 based on its severity. Adding up all the points, the researchers found the total lung ultrasound score was higher for those who had a worsening outcome of COVID-19. (2020-12-10)

Tiny nanospindles enhance use of ultrasound to fight cancer
Ultrasound can be used to treat cancer when used in combination with molecules that sensitize the system to sound waves. These sonosensitizers generate toxic reactive oxygen species that attack and kill tumor cells. In Applied Physics Review, scientists report a new type of sonosensitizer based on a vanadium-doped titanium dioxide that enhances the amount of damage ultrasound inflicts on tumors. Studies in mice showed tumor growth was markedly suppressed when compared to a control group. (2020-12-08)

Post-COVID pain or weakness? Request an ultrasound or MRI
A new Northwestern Medicine study shows how advanced imaging technology can pinpoint what may have caused patients' nerve damage and help determine the best course of treatment. (2020-12-01)

Stanford engineers combine light and sound to see underwater
''Airborne and spaceborne radar and laser-based, or LIDAR, systems have been able to map Earth's landscapes for decades. Radar signals are even able to penetrate cloud coverage and canopy coverage. However, seawater is much too absorptive for imaging into the water,'' said study leader Amin Arbabian, an associate professor of electrical engineering in Stanford's School of Engineering. ''Our goal is to develop a more robust system which can image even through murky water.'' (2020-11-30)

Sound waves power new advances in drug delivery and smart materials
Sound waves have been part of science and medicine for decades, but the technologies have always relied on low frequencies. Now researchers have revealed how high frequency sound waves could revolutionise the field of ultrasound-driven chemistry. (2020-11-24)

Moths strike out in evolutionary arms race with sophisticated wing design
Ultra-thin, super-absorbent and extraordinarily designed to detract attention, the wings of moths could hold the key for developing technological solutions to survive in a noisy world. (2020-11-23)

Emergency imaging trends in pediatric vs. adult patients for abdominal pain
According to AJR, although pediatric CT use has decreased for the evaluation of abdominal pain (perhaps due to implementing an ultrasound-first strategy for suspected appendicitis), CT use has continued to increase among adults with abdominal pain in U.S. emergency department (ED) visits. Although trends in CT use have previously been reported for children and adults, this study is the first to contrast the two cohorts in the ED setting in a nationally representative sample. (2020-11-20)

Just hours of training triples doctor confidence in use of handheld ultrasound devices
Filling a training gap, a Penn Medicine doctor created a geriatric medicine-centered course for point-of-care-ultrasound (POCUS) devices that doubled doctor confidence. (2020-11-17)

New method developed by Lithuanian scientists can reach 90% accuracy in detecting melanoma
A team of researchers from Kaunas University of Technology and Lithuanian University of Health Sciences proposed a non-invasive method for detection of melanoma. A patented computer-aided diagnostic system developed by Lithuanian scientists proved to be more than 90% accurate in detecting malignancy in diagnostic images of skin lesions acquired from 100 patients. (2020-11-09)

Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle biopsy excellent for small pleural lesions diagnosis
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, ultrasound (US)-guided percutaneous pleural needle biopsy (PCPNB) has excellent diagnostic accuracy for small pleural lesions. ''In multivariable analysis,'' the authors concluded, ''pleural morphology on US and needle pathway length through the pleura independently predicted diagnostic yield,'' adding that if the pleura is nodular or thicker than 4.5 mm on CT, US-guided PCPNB is justifiable as an initial or repeat diagnostic test. (2020-11-06)

A malformation illustrates the incredible plasticity of the brain
One in 4,000 people is born without a corpus callosum, a brain structure consisting of neural fibres that are used to transfer information between hemisphere. 25% of them do not have any symptoms. Neuroscientists from the University of Geneva discovered that when the neuronal fibres that act as a bridge between the hemispheres are missing, the brain reorganises itself and creates an impressive number of connections inside each hemisphere, recreating connections using alternative neural pathways. (2020-10-30)

'Fast' MRI detects breast cancers that 3-D mammograms may miss
In a retrospective study of asymptomatic patients, all of whom had a negative 3-D mammogram within the previous 11 months, abbreviated MRI detected roughly 27 cancers per 1,000 women screened. (2020-10-27)

Innovative surgery restores movement in patients with Parsonage-Turner syndrome
Orthopedic surgeons at Hospital for Special Surgery performed successful microsurgery to repair damaged nerves and restore muscle strength and movement to patients experiencing paralysis from Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, according to a study published online ahead of print in The Journal of Hand Surgery. (2020-10-27)

Destroying cancer cells with non-surgical ultrasound treatment
Dr. Ki Joo Pahk's research team at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Center for Bionics confirmed the possibility of precisely fractionating target tumor cells, as though it is cut out using a knife, without causing heat damage to any other part of the body by using high-intensity focused ultrasound. (2020-10-26)

Oncotarget: quantitative ultrasound radiomics in prediction of treatment response for breast cancer
The cover for Issue 42 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, ''Generation of parametric and texture maps from radiofrequency data,'' recently published in ''Quantitative ultrasound radiomics using texture derivatives in prediction of treatment response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer'' by Dasgupta, et al. which reported that to investigate quantitative ultrasound based higher-order texture derivatives in predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. (2020-10-21)

An integrated approach to ultrasound imaging in medicine and biology
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this editorial, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Pingtong Huang considers an integrated approach to ultrasound imaging in medicine and biology. (2020-10-19)

An ultrasonic projector for medicine
A chip-based technology that modulates intensive sound pressure profiles with high resolution opens up new possibilities for ultrasound therapy. (2020-10-19)

Ultrasound technique offers more precise, quantified assessments of lung health
Researchers have developed a technique that uses ultrasound to provide non-invasive assessments of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary edema. The technique has been shown to both quantify lung scarring and detect lung fluid in rats. A study on pulmonary edema in humans is under way. (2020-10-15)

Standalone D-dimer test strategy may simplify diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis
New research suggests that it may be possible to simplify the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) without compromising accuracy. Contrary to the standard practice of administering several tests to diagnose DVT, using only a D-dimer blood test may help health care providers identify patients who require additional screening, according to a new study in Blood Advances. (2020-10-15)

All-terrain microrobot flips through a live colon
A rectangular robot as tiny as a few human hairs can travel throughout a colon by doing back flips, Purdue University engineers have demonstrated in live animal models. (2020-10-15)

Ultrasound screening may be limited in ability to predict perinatal complications
Delivering a newborn with macrosomia (weighing more than 8 pounds, 13 ounces at birth) may be associated with higher risk of adverse outcomes, including perinatal death and injuries related to traumatic delivery, such as stuck shoulders (shoulder dystocia). A study in PLOS Medicine by Gordon Smith at the University of Cambridge and colleagues suggests that third trimester fetal ultrasound screening has the ability to identify more pregnancies with macrosomia. (2020-10-13)

DNA test identifies genetic causes of severe fetal and newborn illness
A new study by University of California researchers shows the promise of high-throughput DNA-sequencing technologies to improve prenatal diagnosis and pregnancy outcomes for women who have experienced an abnormal prenatal ultrasound. (2020-10-07)

Millimetre-precision drug delivery to the brain
Focused ultrasound waves help ETH researchers to deliver drugs to the brain with pinpoint accuracy, in other words only to where their effect is desired. This method is set to enable treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders and tumours with fewer side effects in the future. (2020-10-05)

New method for in utero 4D imaging of baby hearts may aid diagnosis of congenital heart disease
Researchers at King's College London have developed a new method for helping detect congenital heart disease of a baby in pregnant mothers using MRI. Existing in-utero approaches are compromised by fetal motion, but the novel method corrects the motion to present 4D visualizations of the heart depicting major vessels and blood flow circulation. With further development, the method could become a new tool for aiding diagnosis of congenital heart disease where conventional methods like ultrasound might fail. (2020-10-05)

Scale-adaptive auto-context-guided fetal US segmentation with structured random forests
https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0016 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this article the authors Xin Yang, Haoming Li, Li Liu, and Dong Ni from Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China and Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China consider Scale-adaptive Auto-context-guided Fetal US Segmentation with Structured Random Forests. (2020-10-02)

Clinician survey reveals significant variation in ultrasound-guided PIV insertion
A new survey among vascular access (VA) and emergency department (ED) clinicians has revealed significant levels of variation in ultrasound-guided peripheral IV (UGPIV) practices and supply use across hospitals and alternate care settings. Published in the September issue of the Journal of the Association for Vascular Access, the findings carry critical implications for patient safety. (2020-10-01)

Researchers identify new type of superconductor
Until now, the history of superconducting materials has been a tale of two types: s-wave and d-wave. Now, Cornell researchers - led by Brad Ramshaw, the Dick & Dale Reis Johnson Assistant Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences - have discovered a possible third type: g-wave. (2020-09-21)

Researchers have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector. It is based on miniaturized photonic circuits on top of a silicon chip. With a size 100 times smaller than an average human hair, the new detector can visualize features that are much smaller than previously possible, leading to what is known as super-resolution imaging. (2020-09-16)

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