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Current Uranium News and Events, Uranium News Articles.
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Not everything is ferromagnetic in high magnetic fields
High magnetic fields have a potential to modify the microscopic arrangement of magnetic moments because they overcome interactions existing in zero field. Usually, high fields exceeding a certain critical value force the moments to align in the same direction as the field leading to ferromagnetic arrangement. However, a recent study showed that this is not always the case. The experiments took place at the high-field magnet at HZB's neutron source BER II. (2020-02-10)

Prehistoric skeleton discovered in Southern Mexico
A prehistoric human skeleton found in southern Mexico is at least 10,000 years old and most likely dates from the end of the most recent ice age. An international research team led by geoscientists from Heidelberg University studied the remains of the approximately 30-year-old woman. The uranium-thorium dating technique was used to determine the age of the fossil record, which provides important clues on the early settlement history of the American continent. (2020-02-05)

Old molecule, new tricks
Fifty years ago, scientists hit upon what they thought could be the next rocket fuel. Carboranes -- molecules composed of boron, carbon and hydrogen atoms clustered together in three-dimensional shapes -- were seen as the possible basis for next-generation propellants due to their ability to release massive amounts of energy when burned. (2020-01-22)

Research supports new approach to mine reclamation
Geomorphic reclamation is a relatively novel approach intended to mimic the topography of nearby undisturbed lands, with a wide variety of terrain that is stable and less susceptible to erosion. (2020-01-21)

Unused stockpiles of nuclear waste could be more useful than we might think
Chemists have found a new use for the waste product of nuclear power -- transforming an unused stockpile into a versatile compound which could be used to create valuable commodity chemicals as well as new energy sources. (2020-01-10)

Early humans arrived in Southeast Asia later than previously believed
New dates from the World Heritage archeological site at Sangiran on the island of Java suggest that that the first appearance of Homo erectus occurred more recently than previously thought, researchers report. (2020-01-09)

Utilizing relativistic effects for laser fusion: A new approach for clean power
Researchers at Osaka University studied a new approach for laser nuclear fusion utilizing relativistic phenomena of intense laser light. By irradiating the ultra-intense laser light directly onto the fusion fuel, the researchers examined signs of heating of fusion fuel. This work may lead to widespread, clean fusion power. (2020-01-07)

Uranium chemistry and geological disposal of radioactive waste
A new paper to be published on Dec. 16 provides a significant new insight into our understanding of uranium biogeochemistry and could help with the UK's nuclear legacy. The recent study is the first time that researchers have shown that a uranium-sulfide complex can form under conditions representative of a deep underground environment. This complex then transforms further into highly immobile uranium oxide nanoparticles. (2019-12-16)

Researchers perfect nanoscience tool for studies of nuclear waste storage
Studying radiation chemistry and electronic structure of materials at scales smaller than nanometres, the University of Guelph team prepared samples of clay in ultra-thin layers. Working at the TRIUMF particle accelerator, they bombarded the samples with antimatter subatomic particles. They found their system is a proven tool for radiation studies of material to be used to store nuclear waste -- important for Canadian nuclear industry looking to build its first geological repository. (2019-12-12)

What felled the great Assyrian Empire? A Yale professor weighs in
The Neo-Assyrian Empire, centered in northern Iraq and extending from Iran to Egypt -- the largest empire of its time -- collapsed after more than two centuries of dominance at the fall of its capital, Nineveh, in 612 B.C.E. Despite a plethora of cuneiform textual documentation and archaeological excavations and field surveys, archaeologists and historians have been unable to explain the abruptness and finality of the historic empire's collapse. (2019-11-14)

New way to date rocks
A new way to date a common mineral could help pinpoint ore deposits and improve mineral exploration globally, according to University of Queensland scientists. (2019-11-03)

Microrobots clean up radioactive waste (video)
According to some experts, nuclear power holds great promise for meeting the world's growing energy demands without generating greenhouse gases. But scientists need to find a way to remove radioactive isotopes, both from wastewater generated by nuclear power plants and from the environment in case of a spill. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed tiny, self-propelled robots that remove radioactive uranium from simulated wastewater. (2019-10-30)

Six degrees of nuclear separation
For the first time, Argonne scientists have printed 3D parts that pave the way to recycling up to 97 percent of the waste produced by nuclear reactors. From left to right: Peter Kozak, Andrew Breshears, M Alex Brown, co-authors of a recent Scientific Reports article detailing their breakthrough. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.) (2019-10-11)

Rare 'Lazarus superconductivity' observed in promising, rediscovered material
A team of researchers has observed a rare phenomenon called re-entrant superconductivity in the material uranium ditelluride. Nicknamed 'Lazarus superconductivity,' the phenomenon occurs when a superconducting state arises, breaks down, then re-emerges in a material due to a change in a specific parameter -- in this case, the application of a very strong magnetic field. The discovery furthers the case for uranium ditelluride as a promising material for use in quantum computers. (2019-10-07)

Researchers synthesize 'impossible' superconductor
Researchers from the US, Russia, and China have bent the rules of classical chemistry and synthesized a 'forbidden' compound of cerium and hydrogen -- CeH9 -- which exhibits superconductivity at a relatively low pressure of 1 million atmospheres. (2019-10-01)

Geologists found links between deep sea methane emissions and ice ages
Since 2012, researchers at the Division of Bedrock Geology in the Department of Geology of Tallinn University of Technology Aivo Lepland and T├Ánu Martma have been engaged in the research of an international research group investigating the factors controlling methane seepages and reconstructing the chronology of past methane emissions in one of the world's most climate-sensitive regions -- the Barents Sea in the Arctic. (2019-09-11)

Do animals control earth's oxygen level?
For the first time, researchers have measured how the production of algae and the Earth's oxygen level affect each other -- what you might call 'Earth's heartbeat'. Studies of 540 million-year-old limestone indicate that it is not just the oxygen level that affects animals, but that animals can indeed regulate the oxygen level. (2019-09-10)

Laser-produced uranium plasma evolves into more complex species
When energy is added to uranium under pressure, it creates a shock wave, and even a tiny sample will be vaporized like a small explosion. By using smaller, controlled explosions, physicists can test on a microscale what could previously be tested only in larger, more dangerous experiments. In a recent experiment, scientists used a laser to ablate atomic uranium while recording chemical reactions as the plasma cooled, oxidized and formed species of more complex uranium. (2019-08-23)

Scientists unpick the history of Western France, written in 300-million-year-old rainwater
For the first time scientists have been able to reconstruct the chemical composition of rainwater from 300-million-year-old minerals, allowing them to unpick some of the history of Brittany and Western France since the rain fell in the late Carboniferous period, just before the time of the dinosaurs. The results point to the area being mountainous and originally located close to the Equator. This work is presented at the Goldschmidt Geochemistry congress in Barcelona. (2019-08-20)

Rise of dinosaurs linked to increasing oxygen levels
Scientists have found that increasing oxygen levels are linked to the rise of North American dinosaurs around 215 million years ago. A new technique for measuring oxygen levels in ancient rocks shows that oxygen levels in North American rocks leaped by nearly a third in just a couple of million years, possibly setting the scene for a dinosaur expansion into the tropics of North America and elsewhere. From the Goldschmidt Geochemistry conference, Barcelona. (2019-08-20)

Newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'
Newly discovered properties in the compound uranium ditelluride show that it could prove highly resistant to one of the nemeses of quantum computer development -- the difficulty with making such a computer's memory storage switches, called qubits, function long enough to finish a computation before losing the delicate physical relationship that allows them to operate as a group. This relationship, called quantum coherence, is hard to maintain because of disturbances from the surrounding world. (2019-08-15)

ASU researchers study largest impact crater in the US, buried for 35 million years
About 35 million years ago, an asteroid hit the ocean off the East Coast of North America. Its impact formed a 25-mile diameter crater that now lies buried beneath the Chesapeake Bay. A team of researchers has obtained drilling samples from the Ocean Drilling Project site 1073 and dated them with the 'uranium-thorium-helium technique' for the first time. (2019-08-13)

Antineutrino detection could help remotely monitor nuclear reactors
Technology to measure the flow of subatomic particles known as antineutrinos from nuclear reactors could allow continuous remote monitoring designed to detect fueling changes that might indicate the diversion of nuclear materials. The monitoring could be done from outside the reactor vessel, and the technology may be sensitive enough to detect substitution of a single fuel assembly. (2019-08-06)

Using building materials to monitor for high enriched uranium
A new paper details how small samples of ubiquitous building materials, such as tile or brick, can be used to test whether a facility has ever stored high enriched uranium, which can be used to create nuclear weapons. The technique could serve as a valuable forensic tool for national or international efforts related to nuclear nonproliferation and security. (2019-07-15)

Uranium toxicity may be causing high rates of obesity and diabetes in Kuwait
Kuwait has some of the highest rates of obesity and diabetes in the world, and scientists don't know why. This question was addressed by Dr. Max Goodson, Emeritus Professor at the Forsyth Institute. (2019-07-08)

UToledo research links fracking to higher radon levels in Ohio homes
A new study at The University of Toledo connects the proximity of fracking to higher household concentrations of radon gas, the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US. (2019-06-18)

Separation anxiety no more: A faster technique to purify elements
Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a new chemical separation method that is vastly more efficient than conventional processes, opening the door to faster discovery of new elements, easier nuclear fuel reprocessing, and, most tantalizing, a better way to attain actinium-225, a promising therapeutic isotope for cancer treatment. (2019-06-04)

Bio-inspired material targets oceans' uranium stores for sustainable nuclear energy
Scientists have demonstrated a new bio-inspired material for an eco-friendly and cost-effective approach to recovering uranium from seawater. The low-cost polymer adsorbent could help push past bottlenecks in the cost and efficiency of extracting uranium resources from oceans for sustainable energy production. (2019-05-16)

Two neutron stars collided near the solar system billions of years ago
Columbia University and University of Florida researchers finds sign of cosmic event that created elements that became part of us. (2019-05-02)

Searching for lost WWII-era uranium cubes from Germany
In 2013, Timothy Koeth received an extraordinary gift: a heavy metal cube and a crumpled message that read, 'Taken from Germany, from the nuclear reactor Hitler tried to build. Gift of Ninninger.' Koeth accepted the cube and its note as an invitation to the adventure of a lifetime. In Physics Today, Koeth and Miriam Hiebert describe what they've discovered while exploring the German quest and failure to build a working nuclear reactor during WWII. (2019-05-01)

Nuclear 'magic numbers' collapse beyond the doubly magic nickel 78
Scientists have demonstrated that nickel 78, a neutron-rich 'doubly magic' isotope of nickel with 28 protons and 50 neutrons, still maintains a spherical shape that allows it to be relatively stable despite the large imbalance in the number of protons and neutrons. They also discovered a surprise, with the observations from the experiment suggesting that nickel 78 may be the lightest nucleus with 50 neutrons to have a magic nature. (2019-05-01)

Triplet superconductivity demonstrated under high pressure
Researchers in France and Japan have demonstrated a theoretical type of unconventional superconductivity in a uranium-based material, according to a study published in the journal Physical Review Letters. (2019-04-18)

ORNL investigates complex uranium oxides with help from CADES resources
To accelerate the process of identifying novel uranium oxide phases, an ORNL team studied 4,600 different potential crystal structures of uranium oxide compositions on Metis, a CADES high-performance computing cluster. An improved understanding of uranium oxides, which fuel the vast majority of the U.S. nuclear power fleet, could lead to the development of improved fuels or waste storage materials. (2019-03-28)

New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from China have proposed a way to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water. As an essential nuclear fuel, uranium has been greatly used an inevitably released to the environment. Without proper disposal, exposure to uranium can result in serious harms to the ecology and health of humans. (2019-03-14)

Did volcanoes kill the dinosaurs? New evidence points to 'maybe.'
Princeton geoscientists Blair Schoene and Gerta Keller led an international team of researchers who have assembled the first high-resolution timeline for the massive eruptions in India's Deccan Traps, determining that the largest eruption pulse occurred less than 100,000 years before the mass extinction that killed the (non-avian) dinosaurs. (2019-02-22)

Two studies explore timing, influence of deccan trap volcanism in dinosaurs' demise
In two separate studies, researchers using different methods of high-precision dating attempted to illuminate the series of events that led to the demise of vast swaths of life on Earth nearly 66 million years ago. (2019-02-21)

New insights into pion condensation and the formation of neutron stars
Performing studies on a doubly magic isotope of tin, researchers have shown that the pion condensation should occur at around two times normal nuclear density, which can be realized in a neutron star with a mass of 1.4 times that of the Sun. (2018-12-21)

Why does nuclear fission produce pear-shaped nuclei?
Researchers at University of Tsukuba and Australian National University resolved a longstanding puzzle of nuclear fission why nuclear fission of heavy (actinide) nuclei results predominantly in asymmetric mass-splits. These findings may explain surprising bservations of asymmetric fission of lighter than lead nuclei. (2018-12-20)

Marshall University study finds differences in umbilical cord blood metal levels in newborns
New findings from a team of Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine researchers reveal urban and rural differences in prenatal exposure to essential and toxic elements. (2018-12-12)

Uranium in mine dust could dissolve in human lungs
New Mexico contains hundreds of historic uranium mines. Although active uranium mining in the state has ceased, rates of cardiovascular and metabolic disease remain high in the population residing close to mines within the Navajo Nation. According to a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, inhaled uranium in dusts from the mines could be a factor. (2018-12-05)

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