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Current Urinary Incontinence News and Events, Urinary Incontinence News Articles.
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Review: Biofeedback could help treat a number of conditions
A literature review by Veterans Affairs researchers highlights the usefulness of biofeedback for headache and incontinence treatment, and stroke recovery. There was less evidence for its role in other conditions. (2019-08-27)

Health records pin broad set of health risks on genetic premutation
Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Marshfield Clinic have found that there may be a much broader health risk to carriers of the FMR1 premutation, with potentially dozens of clinical conditions that can be ascribed directly to carrying it. The researchers employed machine learning to mine decades of electronic health records of nearly 20,000 individuals. (2019-08-21)

Why initial UTIs increase susceptibility to further infection
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that an initial UTI can set the tone for subsequent infections. In mouse studies, the researchers found that a transient infection triggers a short-lived inflammatory response that rapidly eliminates the bacteria. But a lingering infection leads to persistent inflammation and long-lasting changes to the bladder that prime the immune system to overreact to bacteria the next time, worsening the infection. (2019-08-21)

Study examines maternal exposure to fluoride in pregnancy, kids' IQ scores
An observational study of 601 mother-child pairs from six cities in Canada hints at an apparent association between maternal exposure to fluoride during pregnancy and lower IQ scores measured in children ages 3 to 4. Community water has been fluoridated for decades to prevent tooth decay; a majority of US residents are supplied with fluoridated water, as are more than one-third of Canadian residents and about 3% of European residents. (2019-08-19)

The world's smallest stent
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a new method for producing malleable microstructures -- for instance, vascular stents that are 40 times smaller than previously possible. In the future, such stents could be used to help to widen life-threatening constrictions of the urinary tract in foetuses in the womb. (2019-08-08)

Antenatal screening for kidney problems in early childhood
Babies who have persistent fluid-filled areas in their kidneys during gestation are likely to present with urinary tract problems and to be admitted to hospital in early childhood, according to new research published by Shantini Paranjothy and colleagues at Cardiff University, UK in the open access journal PLOS Medicine on July 30, 2019. (2019-07-30)

E. coli superbug strains can persist in healthy women's guts
A study of over 1,000 healthy women with no urinary tract infection symptoms showed nearly 9% carried multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli strains in their guts. Additional findings highlight likely reasons behind the pandemic of resistant E. coli strains. They show the value of checking a patients' carrier-status to predict resistant infections, and the need to re-think the clinical significance of bacteria in the urine without symptoms, because pandemic strains can be highly pathogenic to the urinary system and treatment resistant. (2019-07-23)

Study shows advantages for stress urinary incontinence surgery
One of the most commonly performed surgeries to treat stress urinary incontinence in women may have better long-term results than another common surgical technique, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic researchers. The retrospective study of more than 1,800 cases at Mayo Clinic from 2002 to 2012 found that the need for additional surgery was twice as high after a transobturator sling surgery compared with a retropubic sling procedure. (2019-07-15)

Salt intake in China among highest in the world for the past 4 decades
Salt intake in China is confirmed to be among the highest in the world, with adults over the past four decades consistently consuming on average above 10g of salt a day, which is more than twice the recommended limit, according to new research led by Queen Mary University of London. (2019-07-11)

Urinary tract and other infections may trigger different kinds of stroke
Several infections have been identified as possible stroke triggers, with urinary tract infections showing the strongest link with ischemic stroke. Healthcare providers need to be aware that stroke can be triggered by infections, researchers noted. (2019-06-27)

New female external catheter technology reduces CAUTI by 50%
Hospital-wide introduction of new female external catheter technology halved the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2019-06-26)

More monitoring needed to reduce post-hospitalization urinary tract infections
Broader monitoring of patients is needed to reduce the number of people who develop a urinary tract infection after being discharged from the hospital, new research suggests. (2019-06-25)

Dickkopf-related protein 3 (DKK3) predicts AKI
Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication after cardiac surgery. The severity fluctuates from subclinical AKI, an increase in biochemical markers, to severe AKI requiring dialysis. Furthermore, AKI impacts hospitalization and mortality. AKI is often diagnosed late - therefore the search for reliable biomarkers for its prediction is important. A new study published in 'The Lancet' showed that urinary DKK3 is an indicator of renal tubular cell stress that significantly improves prediction of AKI. (2019-06-14)

Two genes implicated in development of prostate enlargement, Stanford study finds
In a new study, scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered a molecular pattern that flags prostate enlargement, also called benign prostatic hyperplasia, and have even identified two genes that likely play a role in the development of the condition. (2019-06-14)

Strobe lighting at dance music festivals linked to tripling in epileptic fit risk
Strobe lighting at electronic dance music festivals may be linked to a tripling in the risk of epileptic fits in susceptible individuals, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-06-11)

Study helps develop new treatment option for multi-drug resistant infections
A new study, published in 'Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy' conducted by a University of Liverpool led research consortium, has helped develop a new treatment option for some multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections. (2019-05-29)

Cranberries join forces with antibiotics to fight bacteria
The global spread of antibiotic resistance is undermining decades of progress in fighting bacterial infections. Due to the overuse of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture, we are on the cusp of returning to a pre-antibiotic era in which minor infections can once again become deadly. Therefore, countering the fall in antibiotic efficacy by improving the effectiveness of currently available antibiotics is a crucial goal. (2019-05-28)

Lifting the lid on bladder cancer support
Bladder cancer is a painful and sometimes life-threatening condition that patients can find difficult to talk about, with many becoming homebound as they cope with debilitating side effects such as incontinence. As with prostate and other male cancers, the majority of support and care is taken by the wife, spouse or an immediate family member. The responsibility and burden of the couple's combined cancer 'journey' has been explored by researchers in nursing and medicine at Flinders University. (2019-05-28)

Hospital-acquired infections may be lower in closed ICUs
Three hospital-acquired infections rates appear to be lower in patients admitted to a 'closed' intensive care unit, meaning that the ICU team has primary responsibility for the patient, rather than a primary care physician, (2019-05-22)

Pelvic exercises may beat bedroom blues
Physiotherapists from James Cook University in Australia say simple pelvic floor exercises may be a cure for some common problems men experience in the bedroom. (2019-05-14)

Study details bacteria's role in recurrent urinary tract infections
A new finding by researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Southwestern Medical Center shows that several species of bacteria reside in bladder tissue of postmenopausal women who experience recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs). The results, published online April 17 in the Journal of Molecular Biology, represent the first systematic analysis of biopsies from patients in this population. (2019-05-13)

Researchers find gene for urethral obstruction
Even before birth, an obstructed urethra can cause a variety of issues in the unborn child, ranging from mild urinary problems to kidney failure. This highly variable disease is called LUTO (lower urinary tract obstruction). Especially boys are affected. An international team of researchers led by the University of Bonn has now discovered a first gene involved in this rare disease. The results are now published in the ''American Journal of Human Genetics''. (2019-05-02)

Environmental pollutants could impact cellular signs of aging
Researchers have linked some environmental pollutants with diseases, a decreased life span and signs of premature aging, such as wrinkles and age spots. But can accelerated aging be detected at the cellular level in healthy people exposed to pollutants? Now, researchers in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology report that although pollutant exposure can affect two hallmarks of aging in people (mitochondrial DNA content and telomere length), the results are not so clear-cut. (2019-05-01)

Cranberry oligosaccharides might help prevent UTIs
Many people have heard that drinking cranberry juice can help prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Although clinical trials of this popular folk remedy have produced mixed results, some studies have shown that drinking cranberry juice can keep bacteria that cause UTIs from sticking to cells lining the urinary tract. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Natural Products have identified cranberry oligosaccharides in the urine of cranberry-fed pigs that could be responsible for this activity. (2019-05-01)

Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'
Molecular details on how harmful bacteria attach to the human body have been revealed for the first time by researchers from the La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science (LIMS). This new knowledge could have huge impacts in anti-microbial development. (2019-04-29)

Researchers identify ways to predict and avoid radiotherapy side effects
Latest results from a project to discover what makes a cancer patient more likely to suffer adverse side effects after radiotherapy have shown that a combination of biological markers and certain genetic changes can predict radiation sensitivity. The research is presented at ESTRO 38. (2019-04-29)

Parents reassured febrile seizures following vaccination not dangerous
New University of Sydney research finds that febrile seizures after vaccination are rare, not serious and are no different to febrile seizures due to other causes such as from a virus. (2019-04-24)

Thiazide diuretics reduced the risk of fractures in people with Alzheimer's disease
The use of thiazide diuretics was associated with a decreased risk of low energy fractures in people with Alzheimer's disease, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The association was found in long-term use exceeding three years; however, shorter term use did not reduce the risk of fractures. Thiazides are typically prescribed to treat hypertension. (2019-04-23)

High prevalence of healthcare-associated infections and low testing rates found in European hospitals and long-term care facilities
The European Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC) estimates that 9 million cases of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occur across Europe each year -- with around one in 15 patients in acute care hospitals and one in 24 residents in long-term care facilities having at least one infection on any given day. (2019-04-12)

UK study shows most patients with suspected urinary tract infection and treated with antibiotics actually lack evidence of this infection
New research presented at this week's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019) shows that only one third of patients that enter the emergency department with suspected urinary tract infection (UTI) actually have evidence of this infection, yet almost all are treated with antibiotics, unnecessarily driving the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. (2019-04-11)

Specialist enzymes make E. coli antibiotic resistant at low pH
New research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that many cell wall enzymes that were previously considered 'redundant' are actually specialists that ensure maximal growth across different environments. Further, these specialist enzymes were found to increase E. coli's resistance to antibiotics at low pH conditions, such as those found in the GI tract or urinary tract -- raising concerns that current antibiotic susceptibility tests are inadequate. (2019-04-09)

Social insecurity also stresses chimpanzees
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology conducted behavioral observations and collected urine samples for cortisol analysis of male chimpanzees of the Tai National Park, Ivory Coast, during periods of intense male-male competition. They showed that all males had higher stress levels during periods of increased male-male competition while aggression rates were actually lower during this time. This may indicate that in times of social instability animals refrain from aggressive actions to avoid escalation of conflicts and to promote group cohesion. (2019-04-05)

University of Manchester technology set to lead fight against anti-microbial resistance
Professor Douglas Kell and colleagues have developed novel technology that identifies the most effective antibiotic to kill organisms in urinary tract infections. (2019-04-04)

UBC research recommends graduated return to work after prostatectomy
UBC research cautions men recovering from a radical prostatectomy to take it easy when returning to work. School of Nursing Professors Joan Bottorff and John Oliffe are scientists with UBC's Men's Health Research program. They, along with study lead Wellam Yu Ko, recently published research exploring the journey back into the workforce following surgery to remove prostate cancer. Their research concluded a graduated or 'reduced workload' program is the best option following a radical prostatectomy. (2019-04-02)

Estrogen byproducts linked to survival in breast cancer patients
In an abstract presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, researchers report findings from a study in which they measured levels of estrogen byproducts in urine from a group of women with breast cancer. Relative levels of ''good'' versus ''bad'' estrogen byproducts were linked to survival. (2019-03-30)

Examining ball pits as a playground for pathogenic germs
Beware the ball pit. Ball pits used in children's physical therapy -- similar to those made popular by restaurants catering to families -- may contribute to germ transmission between patients, according to new research published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, published by Elsevier. (2019-03-21)

Laser-targeted removal of prostate tumors works as well complete removal of prostate
Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, led by prostate cancer treatment pioneer Dr. Eric Walser, have shown that selectively destroying cancerous prostate tissue is as effective as complete prostate removal or radiation therapy while preserving more sexual and urinary function than the other treatments. (2019-03-20)

Hormonal treatment may trigger depression in men with prostate cancer
Men who receive anti-hormonal treatment after having their prostate removed are 80 percent more likely to suffer from depression than men who don't receive this treatment. This leads researchers to suggest that patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy should be monitored for post-surgical depression. This is presented at the European Association of Urology congress in Barcelona. (2019-03-17)

Even younger nightshift workers shown to need to pee more, worsening quality of life
Millions of people work nights, but increasingly scientists are finding that night work is associated with health problems. Now a group of Italian scientists has found that nightshift workers also need to pee more, leading to a deteriorating quality of life for many workers, including care workers. This is also true of younger subjects, who would not normally be expected to report an overactive bladder. This work is reported at the European Association of Urology Congress in Barcelona. (2019-03-15)

Study suggests personality tests may improve care for prostate cancer patients
Scientists have found that men with high neuroticism -- between a quarter and a fifth of men in developed countries -- are significantly more likely to suffer from adverse events such as erectile dysfunction and incontinence, which may put their recovery from prostate cancer surgery at risk. The researchers say that this means cancer teams may need to consider testing for personality types to try to ensure that patients being treated for prostate cancer receive the best care. (2019-03-15)

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