Current Urine News and Events

Current Urine News and Events, Urine News Articles.
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Lipid biomarkers in urine can determine the type of asthma
In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have used a urine test to identify and verify a patient's type of asthma. The study, which has been published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, lays the foundation for a more personalized diagnosis and may result in improved treatment of severe asthma in the future. (2021-01-13)

Mechanisms in the kidney that control magnesium and calcium levels discovered
The gene KCTD1 directs production of a protein that functions in the kidney to maintain a normal balance of magnesium and calcium in blood. Loss of KCTD1 impairs the ability of the kidney to properly absorb magnesium and calcium from urine in the kidney, leading to abnormally low magnesium and calcium blood levels, thereby triggering the parathyroid glands to secrete excess parathyroid hormone that in turn leads to metabolic bone disease. (2021-01-12)

Fetal-maternal discordance in APOL1 genotype contributes to preeclampsia risk
Fetal APOL1 kidney risk alleles are associated with increased risk for preeclampsia in African Americans and maternal fetal genotype discordance is also associated with this risk. (2021-01-12)

Study finds new evidence of health threat from chemicals in marijuana and tobacco smoke
Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have uncovered new evidence of the potential health risks of chemicals in tobacco and marijuana smoke. (2021-01-11)

NIH study suggests using cannabis while trying to conceive may reduce pregnancy chances
Women who use marijuana could have a more difficult time conceiving a child than women who do not use marijuana, suggests a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Marijuana use among the women's partners--which could have influenced conception rates--was not studied. (2021-01-11)

Cannabis could reduce fentanyl use, reduce overdose risk: Study
New research suggests that cannabis use by people in care for opioid addiction might improve their treatment outcomes and reduce their risk of being exposed to fentanyl in the contaminated unregulated drug supply. (2020-12-18)

Treatment of opioid use disorder among commercially insured patients in context of COVID-19 pandemic
Opioid use disorder treatment during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, including medication fills, outpatient visits and urine tests among privately insured individuals, was compared with 2019 in this study. (2020-12-15)

Analysis finds gaps in care in treating opioid use disorders during pandemic shutdowns
Study finds no decrease in prescription fills or clinician visits in the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic for patients recently receiving opioid use disorder therapy. On the flip side, the study found that during this period fewer people started new treatment for opioid use disorder and fewer urine tests were given across both new and established patients. Findings identify strengths and weaknesses in telemedicine's role for opioid use disorder during shutdowns and can inform strategies for improvement. (2020-12-15)

'Peecycling' payoff: Urine diversion shows multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale
Diverting urine away from municipal wastewater treatment plants and recycling the nutrient-rich liquid to make crop fertilizer would result in multiple environmental benefits when used at city scale, according to a new University of Michigan-led study. (2020-12-15)

One's trash, another's treasure: fertilizer made from urine could enable space agriculture
From the perspective of future societies, in extremely closed environments such as a space station, self-sufficiency in food cultivation and waste management is critical. However, the technology to achieve this is still lacking. In a new study, scientists from Japan shed light on their most recent breakthrough: a cheap and efficient method to make liquid fertilizer (ammonia) from simplified artificial urine, serving an ideal dual purpose of growing food and treating waste. (2020-12-14)

UL, Ireland, research finds promising treatment to protect kidney function in diabetes
A clinical trial involving researchers at University of Limerick, Ireland has demonstrated the potential benefits of new drugs in protecting kidney function in diabetes. (2020-12-09)

A new era is dawning in diagnosing sexually transmitted infections in men
Researchers and doctors from the University of Tartu and Tartu University Hospital evaluated the use of a novel revolutionary method, flow cytometry, for diagnosing urethritis in Estonian men. The study published in PLOS ONE confirmed the efficiency of the method and showed that most often urethritis was due to chlamydia. Gonorrhoea caused the strongest urethral inflammation. (2020-12-03)

Liver condition identified in patients using urine samples: new research
Fifty fragments of proteins, termed peptides, have been identified in the urine of liver fibrosis patients in a new study that could pave the way for a potential diagnostic urine test for the condition if further validated. (2020-11-16)

'Smart Wrap' implant may help people better control their bladders
An implantable smart wrap that fits safely and securely around the bladder may one day help people who have under-active bladders, a condition that hinders patients from urinating regularly and comfortably, according to an international team of researchers. (2020-11-11)

Veganism: Vitamin B12 is well supplemented, iodine is a matter of concern
Those following a vegan diet have an increased risk of iodine deficiency. This is indicated by the results of a research project from the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). In the 'Risks and benefits of a vegan diet' (RBVD) study project, a BfR research team investigated the nutrient supply in 36 people following a vegan diet and 36 people with a mixed diet. (2020-11-10)

Intensive urate lowering reduces urine albumin excretion
Phase 2 trial of verinurad with febuxostat vs. placebo shows 49% reduction in albuminuria (2020-10-29)

Cell-Free DNA provides a dynamic window into health
A new study presented at the ASHG 2020 Virtual Meeting shows how cfDNA testing can be used to provide insight into a patient's health. (2020-10-26)

Researchers improve the standard method for assessing cardiovascular disease risk
Taking into account two common kidney disease tests may greatly enhance doctors' abilities to estimate patients' cardiovascular disease risks, enabling millions of patients to have better preventive cardiovascular care. (2020-10-14)

Urine-based liquid biopsy test outperforms urine cytology in detecting bladder cancer
Analysis of DNA copy number variants (CNVs) in the cells exfoliated in urine showed better sensitivity and similar specificity in detecting urothelial carcinoma compared with urine cytology (2020-10-09)

Study could be first step in providing personalized care to patients with ureteral stents
Published today in Cell Reports Medicine, researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University conducted a novel microbiome study to examine bacteria associated with ureteral stents. They found that nearly all the stents, whether visibly coated or not, had unique bacterial profiles that were most associated with a patient's medical condition rather than antibiotic use. For patients with ureteral stents, they may benefit from a personalized approach to care and antibiotic treatment. (2020-09-25)

A better alternative to Phthalates?
In collaboration with the Medical University of South Carolina, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) analyzed urine samples from pregnant women to look for the presence of DINCH, which is short for di(isononyl)cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate. They found concentrations of DINCH in most of the urine samples but no evidence of effects in lab assays on two hormones, progesterone and estrogen. (2020-09-25)

Rubbery properties help RNA nanoparticles target tumors efficiently and quickly leave body
A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute shows that RNA nanoparticles have elastic and rubbery properties that help explain why these particles target tumors so efficiently and why they possess lower toxicity in animal studies. (2020-09-14)

Toxic metals can affect student health performance, say scientists from RUDN university
A group of medical and environmental researchers from RUDN University evaluated the level of heavy metals in the organism of first-year university students from different countries of the world. The results of the screening helped the scientists to reveal a relationship between a region of residence and the level of toxic metal in organism. According to their opinion, increased heavy metal levels in the organism of students from Africa and Latin America can have a negative impact on their health and performance. (2020-09-14)

Kidney problems as a young adult may affect thinking skills in midlife
If you have moderate-to-high risk of kidney failure as a young adult, you may be at risk for worse cognitive function in middle age, according to a study published in the Sept. 2, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-09-02)

Detecting small amounts of virus in early infections
Diagnostic devices that are used at home or in doctors' offices are often not sensitive enough to detect small amounts of a virus that might be present in samples from asymptomatic patients, which can occur in early stage COVID-19. In Biomicrofluidics, scientists report a membrane-based invention that can concentrate the virus content of a sample of urine or saliva, allowing it to be detected. (2020-09-01)

Cardiac biomarker shows stronger associations with kidney disease progression than BP
Identifying biomarkers for kidney disease progression may elucidate disease pathways and inform treatment. In a study of 3,379 adults with kidney disease followed for 12 years (47% with diabetes), elevated levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, a cardiac biomarker, were strongly associated with kidney disease progression; associations were stronger than those with systolic blood pressure ?140 mmHg, regardless of heart failure status. These findings highlight the potential role of cardiac disease in kidney disease progression. (2020-08-28)

Reproducing the pathophysiology of polycystic kidney disease from human iPS cells
A joint research project has successfully reproduced the pathogenesis of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) from human iPS cells in vitro. Although cysts derived from renal tubules have been previously documented, this is the first derivation of cysts from collecting ducts, which is more closely related to the pathogenesis of the disease. This research is expected to lead to a better understanding of disease states and the development of new treatment methods. (2020-08-21)

Urine sediment test results, diagnoses vary significantly across nephrologists
A new study shows that nephrologists do not always agree on their interpretation of images from urine sediment tests, which are frequently ordered to evaluate a variety of kidney diseases. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center and published in JAMA Network Open, the findings indicate the need to standardize education and training around evaluating urine sediment tests to improve the test's reliability, and help prevent misinterpretation and potential patient harm. (2020-08-21)

Ratio of two proteins may add kidneys to the transplant donor pool
An investigation by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, in collaboration with researchers at 13 other medical institutions in the United States, has shown that two proteins found in deceased donor urine can be measured to define which donor organs -- including those with AKI -- are the best candidates for saving the lives of patients with kidney failure. (2020-08-18)

Molecules in urine allow doctors to monitor skin cancer
What if you could simply provide a urine sample rather than undergo a painful surgical procedure to find out if your cancer was responding to treatment? It may seem too good to be true, but researchers at Pavol Jozef Šafárik University in Košice, Slovakia, have identified fluorescent molecules in urine that may allow patients with malignant melanoma to do just that. (2020-08-11)

Reducing urinary protein for patients with rare kidney disease slows kidney decline
New findings show that reducing the amount of protein in the urine of patients with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis can significantly slow declines in kidney function and extend time before patients' kidneys fail. (2020-08-10)

Neuroendocrine markers of grief
Researchers have examined what's currently known about the neuroendocrine effects of grief and whether biological factors can predict complicated or prolonged grief after the death of a loved one. The findings appear in the Journal of Neuroendocrinology. (2020-08-05)

Estimating bisphenol exposures in the Australian population
Once found in bottles, food containers, cash register receipts and electronics, bisphenol A (BPA) has been phased out of many products because of health concerns and government regulations. As a result, the production and use of BPA analogs, which are unregulated and poorly understood, have increased. Now, by analyzing urine samples and wastewater, researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology how human exposure to bisphenols has changed over time in an Australian population. (2020-07-29)

Higher BPA levels linked to more asthma symptoms in children
Children in low-income neighborhoods in Baltimore tended to have more asthma symptoms when levels of the synthetic chemical BPA (Bisphenol A) in their urine were elevated, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and School of Medicine. (2020-07-28)

Simple urine test could significantly improve detection of adrenal cancer
Using a simple urine test alongside routine imaging for patients with adrenal masses could speed up adrenal cancer diagnosis, improving patient's prognosis and reducing the need for invasive diagnostic procedures, a new multi-centre study published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology has found. (2020-07-23)

Non-invasive biomarkers to diagnose infant urinary tract obstruction
One in every 500 babies is born with ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO), an obstruction of the ureter that prevents urine from flowing from one or both of the kidneys into the bladder. A group of researchers led by Linda Shapiro and Charan Kumar Devarakonda from UConn's School of Medicine developed an inexpensive, non-invasive panel of five biomarker proteins for the diagnosis and monitoring of UPJO in infants and toddlers. (2020-07-22)

Exhaled biomarkers can reveal lung disease
Using specialized nanoparticles, MIT engineers have developed a way to diagnose pneumonia or other lung diseases by analyzing the breath exhaled by the patient. (2020-07-20)

Women taking menopausal hormone therapy may be more resistant to urine infections
In the first analysis of its kind, US-based doctors have shown that women who take menopausal hormone therapy (MHT, also known as HRT) have a greater variety of beneficial bacteria in their urine, possibly creating conditions that discourage urinary infections. The study also shows that women who suffer from recurrent urine infections have fewer different types of bacteria in urine than women who don't have infections, making them more prone to infections. Presented at the European Association of Urology Virtual Congress (2020-07-17)

Research helping to improve detection of disease in newborn babies
New research will help health-care practitioners to more accurately diagnose disease and illness in newborn babies from urine samples, according to a study by researchers at the University of Alberta and the Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas. (2020-07-16)

Decision support system within the EHR system can increase provider awareness of CKD
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects approximately 37 million U.S. adults and less than 25% are aware of their disease. CKD is readily identified with simple blood and urine tests that are often in a patient's health record yet providers usually do not diagnose the CKD and inform the patient. This study demonstrates that implementation of a decision support system within the electronic health records system can increase provider awareness of CKD. (2020-07-16)

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