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Current Urologists News and Events, Urologists News Articles.
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Narrow band imaging can reduce recurrence of bladder tumors
Research into bladder tumor surgery has found that using narrow band imaging can significantly reduce the risk of disease recurrence. (2016-04-28)

New model for active surveillance of prostate cancer tested
Urologists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Genesis Healthcare Partners have tested a new model of care for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. The evidence-based approach uses best practices to appropriately select and follow patients to avoid disease overtreatment. Results of the three-year study are now published online in the journal of Urology. (2016-04-27)

Researchers look for causes of unexpected early bladder cancer recurrence after laparoscopic surgery
Although laparoscopic radical cystectomy (LRC) and robotic assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) continue to grow in popularity and are successful in the treatment of bladder cancer, they are still considered experimental approaches. Using data collected by the Section of Uro-Technology of the European Association of Urology, a team of researchers found that about 5 percent of patients experienced unexpected relapses of cancer after LRC, even with favorable pathology. Their results are reported in The Journal of Urology®. (2016-04-26)

New effects of ketamine abuse uncovered
Research conducted by scientists at the University of York has revealed how recreational ketamine abuse damages the bladder. (2016-03-18)

Higher volume radiation facilities associated with better survival rates
In a new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, investigators looked at men with aggressive prostate cancer who were treated with radiation as well as the case volume of the facility at which they were treated. They found that receiving radiation at a facility that treats a high volume of prostate cancer patients with radiation was associated with improved overall survival. (2016-03-16)

Can we predict aggressiveness of prostate cancer before surgery with a blood test?
Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer, with 400,000 new cases every year in Europe. The success of surgery depends on a variety of factors. Now a new study from scientists in Milan has shown that for local prostate cancers treated with radical prostatectomy, you can preoperatively predict the aggressiveness of the prostatic disease, via a simple blood test. (2016-03-11)

Difference in PSA testing among urologist and primary care physician visits
Declines in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing differed among urologist and primary care physician visits in a study that compared testing before and after a 2011 recommendation from the US Preventive Services Task Force against PSA screening for all men, according to an article published online by JAMA Internal Medicine. (2016-02-08)

Female urologists still earn less money than their male counterparts
Although the field of urology remains largely male dominated, the proportion of female physicians specializing in urology has increased from less than 0.5percent in 1981 to 10 percent today, and 33 percent of students entering urology internships and residency programs are now female. Researchers report in The Journal of Urology that gender inequality between male and female urologists persists with women currently earning approximately $76,000 less than men annually. (2016-01-05)

More men at risk for prostate cancer as a result of less regular screening
The US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation against regular prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening for prostate cancer is controversial. While it may reduce the risk of over diagnosis and overtreatment, the reduction in intermediate and high risk cancer diagnoses raises concern because of the potential for delayed diagnoses of important cancers in men who may benefit from treatment, according to investigators reporting in The Journal of Urology. (2015-09-22)

Study: Some with low-risk prostate cancer not likely to succumb to the disease
Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors and whose disease is carefully monitored by urologists are unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer or die of their cancers, according to results of a study by researchers at the Brady Urological Institute at Johns Hopkins, who analyzed survival statistics up to 15 years. (2015-08-31)

Robert Flanigan, M.D., receives Distinguished Service Award
Loyola University Medical Center urologist Robert Flanigan, M.D., has won a Distinguished Service Award from the Chicago Urological Society. (2015-04-21)

Sweeping prostate cancer review upends widely held belief on radiation after surgery
Two new studies have upended the widely held view that it's best to delay radiation treatment as long as possible after the removal of the prostate in order to prevent unwanted side effects. (2015-03-23)

Close monitoring of renal tumors may provide alternative to surgery
In patients likely to have surgery, close, active monitoring of small renal tumors confined to the kidneys is associated with low rates of tumor growth or death. (2015-01-21)

Laparoscopic surgery for bladder cancer leads to good long-term cancer control
Long-term survival rates following laparoscopic surgery for bladder cancer are comparable to those of open surgery, according to a study published in BJU International. (2014-12-18)

Long-term testosterone therapy does not increase the risk of prostate cancer
Testosterone (T) therapy is routinely used in men with hypogonadism, a condition in which diminished function of the gonads occurs. Although there is no evidence that T therapy increases the risk of prostate cancer (PCa), there are still concerns and a paucity of long-term data. Investigators examined three parallel, prospective, ongoing, cumulative registry studies of over 1,000 men. Their analysis showed that long-term T therapy in hypogonadal men is safe and does not increase the risk of PCa. (2014-11-25)

Physicians play a critical role in ensuring bladder cancer patients
When bladder cancer patients are well-informed by their physicians, they acknowledge that tobacco use was likely the cause of their disease. (2014-11-10)

Quality of biopsy directly linked to survival in bladder cancer patients
UCLA researchers have shown for the first time that the quality of diagnostic staging using biopsy in patients with bladder cancer is directly linked with survival. (2014-10-22)

How closely do urologists adhere to AUA guidelines?
Evidence-based guidelines play an increasing role in setting standards for medical practice and quality but are seldom systematically evaluated in the practice setting. Investigators evaluated the rate of physician adherence to the American Urological Association's guidelines on the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia/lower urinary tract symptoms to establish a benchmark for future research. Their findings are published in The Journal of Urology. (2014-10-15)

Prostate cancer is focus of 2 studies, commentary
Management of low-risk prostate cancer, which is unlikely to cause symptoms or affect survival if left untreated, varies widely among urologists and radiation oncologists, with patients whose diagnosis is made by a urologist that treats non-low-risk prostate cancer more likely to receive treatment vs. observation. (2014-07-14)

Study finds diagnosing physicians influence therapy decisions for prostate cancer patients
New research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is shedding light on the important role a diagnosing urologist plays in whether older men with low-risk prostate cancer receive treatment for their disease, and if so, the type of treatment they receive as a result. (2014-07-14)

Most prostate cancer specialists don't recommend active surveillance for low-risk patients
Specialists who treat prostate cancer agree that active surveillance is an effective option -- yet most don't recommend it when appropriate for their own patients, according to a study in the July issue of Medical Care. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health. (2014-06-16)

Prostate specific antigen screening declines after 2012 USPSTF recommendations
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center have assessed the impact of the 2012 US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations against routine prostate specific antigen (PSA) cancer screenings, which cited evidence that the risks of screening outweigh the benefits. Results of the current study indicate that the USPSTF recommendations have resulted in a decrease in the number of PSA screenings ordered by doctors, with the greatest decline seen among urologists. (2014-03-13)

Myriad publishes clinical utility study for Prolaris
Data from the PROCEDE 500 study published in the journal Current Medical Research and Opinion demonstrate that 65 percent of physicians changed their original treatment plans for men with prostate cancer based on results from the Prolaris test. (2014-03-03)

Beaumont holds first international congress on underactive bladder
Beaumont Health System urologists hope to heighten awareness of underactive bladder, or UAB, through an international forum funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The Feb. 20-21 Congress of Urologic Research and Education on Aging Underactive Bladder, or CURE-UAB, in Bethesda, Md., is attracting physicians, researchers and nurses from around the world for scientific discussion and interdisciplinary collaboration. (2014-02-19)

Trial to test using ultrasound to move kidney stones
A clinical trial in Seattle is testing the use of low-power ultrasound to reposition kidney stones. (2014-01-10)

Better guidelines, coordination needed for prostate cancer specialists
With a deluge of promising new drug treatments for advanced prostate cancer on the market, a new model of care is needed that emphasizes collaboration between urologists and medical oncologists, according to UC Davis prostate cancer experts. (2013-12-09)

Counting the cost of infertility treatment
Although the demand for infertility treatment is rising, the high cost may deter some couples from seeking care. Researchers from the University of California-San Francisco assessed direct out-of-pocket costs for couples undergoing fertility treatment. Those using medication only had the lowest out-of-pocket expenses at $912, while those using in vitro fertilization had the highest at $19,234. The results, published in The Journal of Urology®, will help inform couples who seek infertility care and the physicians who counsel them. (2013-12-06)

Protein in prostate biopsies signals increased cancer risk
Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College have shown that the presence of a particular protein in biopsied prostate tissue substantially increases the likelihood that cancer will develop in that organ. The discovery will likely help physicians decide how closely to monitor men potentially at risk for the cancer -- among the most confusing and controversial dilemmas in health care. (2013-12-03)

Elsevier announces the launch of open access journal: Urology Case Reports
Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, today announced the launch of a new open access journal: Urology Case Reports. (2013-11-25)

More pediatric kidney patients are being treated with minimally invasive surgical techniques
More children, like adults, are undergoing minimally invasive surgery for diseased kidneys, with most of the procedures being performed at teaching hospitals to treat non-cancerous conditions. Those conclusions were reached in a unique study by researchers at Henry Ford Hospital who set out to fill a knowledge gap about the use of nephrectomy -- the surgical removal of a diseased kidney -- in the US pediatric population. (2013-11-25)

New study: Enterocystoplasty in children with genitourinary abnormalities is safe and effective
Enterocystoplasty is a good surgical option with a low rate of severe complications in the treatment of children who were born with developmental abnormalities of the genitourinary system, according to the new study conducted by a group of Portuguese urologists. (2013-10-29)

NEJM study exposes overuse of radiation therapy when urologists profit from self-referral
A comprehensive review of Medicare claims for more than 45,000 patients from 2005 through 2010 found that nearly all of the 146 percent increase in intensity- modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer among urologists with an ownership interest in the treatment was due to self-referral, according to new research, (2013-10-23)

Study: Women most often suffer urinary tract infections, but men more likely to be hospitalized
While women are far more likely to suffer urinary tract infections, men are more prone to be hospitalized for treatment, according to a study by Henry Ford Hospital urologists. The first-of-its-kind research for the most common bacterial infection in the US is important in providing predictors of hospital admission at a time when the health care industry is searching for ways to reduce costs. (2013-10-08)

High Medicare spending on prostate cancer screenings, but little benefit for older men
Prostate cancer screening has little benefit for men aged 75 and older, yet over three years, the Medicare fee-for-service program spent $447 million annually on PSA-based screenings -- one-third of which was for men in the over 75 age group, according to study by researchers at the Yale Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center. (2013-10-04)

Latin American Urology Association names annual award after UCLA's Dr. Shlomo Raz
The Confederation Americano de Urologia, an organization of 8,000 urologists from Central and South American, Mexico and Spain, is honoring Raz for his efforts by naming its highest accolade in his honor and bestowing the inaugural medal on him. (2013-10-01)

Information conveyed to urologists regarding laser fiber diameter is incorrect, says new study
Neither the total nor the core diameters of laser fibers correspond to the advertised laser fiber diameter, revealed a new study investigating lasers used for urological surgery. Furthermore, there are serious differences between manufacturers of fibers with a supposedly equal diameter. (2013-09-17)

New cooling technique for robotic surgery performed on difficult kidney stone
A first-ever technique using ice slush and minimally invasive robotic surgery to remove a particularly large type of kidney stone has been reported by urologists at Henry Ford Hospital. Dubbed RANL, for robotic anatrophic nephrolithotomy, the technique was devised to remove staghorn calculi -- large kidney stones with sharp, craggy branches -- that can cause disease and sometimes death if left untreated. (2013-08-27)

Women at increasing risk of kidney stones, related ER visits
The risk of women developing kidney stones is rising, as is the number of cases being seen in US emergency departments, while the rate of hospitalization for the disorder has remained stable. (2013-08-26)

Freezing sperm taken directly from testicles is effective option for infertile couples
Frozen sperm taken by biopsy from testicles in men with no sperm in their semen is as effective as fresh sperm taken by biopsy in helping couples conceive through in vitro fertilization, according to a study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (2013-08-06)

Sharing data with providers associated with plummeting rates of unnecessary medical tests in Sweden
The rate of inappropriate cancer scans for low-risk prostate cancer patients in Sweden plummeted in the decade following a joint campaign to curtail such tests, suggest that curtailing unneeded medical tests, an urgent healthcare policy goal in the United States highlighted in the Choosing Wisely Campaign, among other initiatives, is achievable, says Danil V. Makarov, M.D., assistant professor of urology and population health at NYU Langone Medical Center and lead author of the study. (2013-07-23)

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