Current Uterine Fibroids News and Events

Current Uterine Fibroids News and Events, Uterine Fibroids News Articles.
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New model helping identify pregnant women whose previous kidney injury puts them, babies at risk
Young pregnant women, who appear to have fully recovered from an acute injury that reduced their kidney function, have higher rates of significant problems like preeclampsia and low birthweight babies, problems which indicate their kidneys have not actually fully recovered. MCG scientists have developed a rodent model that is enabling studies to better understand, identify and ideally avoid this recently identified association. (2021-02-22)

How a gene called HAND2 may impact the timing of labor
Using new and existing datasets the team studied genes that were active in the uterine linings of different animals while pregnant or carrying eggs. Scientists also investigated the changing levels of HAND2 during gestation. (2021-02-22)

More than half of cancer survivors have underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID
New study finds more than half (56.4%) of cancer survivors in the United States reported having additional underlying medical conditions associated with severe COVID-19 illness. (2021-02-03)

Oncotarget: Neuroendocrine carcinoma of uterine cervix findings shown by MRI
''The Oncotarget author's findings show that MRI is reliable for T staging of cervical NEC'' (2021-02-01)

Important cause of preeclampsia discovered
New findings show that cholesterol crystals in the uterine wall are the villain that researchers have been looking for. These crystals cause intensified inflammation in people who become ill. (2021-01-21)

Nanotechnology prevents premature birth in mouse studies
In a study in mice and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that they have developed a tiny, yet effective method for preventing premature birth. (2021-01-13)

Despite same treatment, obese women face more risks for postpartum hemorrhage complications
As part of an academic medical center initiative to improve maternal health, researchers at the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) and Tampa General Hospital (TGH) examined how obesity affected the management and outcomes of postpartum hemorrhage at a tertiary care center. The findings highlight that certain groups of high-risk obstetric patients, such as obese women, may need a different treatment protocol for postpartum hemorrhage, a potentially serious and largely preventable obstetric complication. (2020-12-21)

Gene therapy for placental insufficiency moves toward the clinic
A new study identified an adenovirus gene therapy vector carrying a VEGF isoform. It can improve uterine blood flow in placental insufficiency. (2020-12-15)

Promising treatment for premenstrual dysphoric disorder, PMDD
The mental symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder improve following treatment with a progesterone receptor modulator, as demonstrated by SciLifeLab researcher Erika Comasco and Professor Inger Sundström-Poromaa, Uppsala University. The mechanism of action of the study drug provides insights into the potential molecular mechanisms underlying this psychiatric disorder and its treatment. (2020-12-10)

Destroying cancer cells with non-surgical ultrasound treatment
Dr. Ki Joo Pahk's research team at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology Center for Bionics confirmed the possibility of precisely fractionating target tumor cells, as though it is cut out using a knife, without causing heat damage to any other part of the body by using high-intensity focused ultrasound. (2020-10-26)

RUDN University doctors suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in endometriosis patients
A team of doctors from RUDN University with their Italian colleagues had studied the data of existing studies on the effect of endometriosis on pregnancy and childbirth and suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in women with this condition. (2020-10-14)

New study estimates nearly 90,000 cancer cases diagnosed in adolescents and young adults
A new report examining cancer in adolescents and young adults (AYAs), defined as diagnoses occurring during ages 15 to 39, provides updated estimates of the contemporary cancer burden in this age group, predicting that 89,500 cases and 9,270 deaths will occur in 2020 in the United States. (2020-09-17)

Study finds cancer mapping may solve puzzle of regional disease links
New statistical analysis finds cancer mapping may help question regional disease links. (2020-08-13)

A cancer mystery of more than 40 years ago is solved thanks to epigenetics
In an article that was just published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by the group of Dr. Manel Esteller, Director of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute, ICREA Research Professor and Professor of Genetics at the University of Barcelona is solved this mystery by describing that in cancer cells the protein that generates the nucleotide ''Y'' is epigenetically inactivated, causing small but highly aggressive tumors. (2020-08-12)

Oncotarget: Therapeutic efficacy of liposomal Grb2 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (L-Grb2)
The cover for issue 29 of Oncotarget features Figure 5, ''In vivo effects of treatment with L-Grb2 in combination with anti-angiogenic therapy in an ovarian tumor model,'' by Lara, et al. which reported that adaptor proteins such as growth factor receptor-bound protein-2 play important roles in cancer cell signaling. In the present study, the authors examined the biological effects of liposomal antisense oligodeoxynucleotide that blocks Grb2 expression in gynecologic cancer models. (2020-07-22)

Simple twist of DNA determines fate of placenta
The development of the mammalian placenta depends upon an unusual twist that separates DNA's classic double helix into a single-stranded form, Yale researchers report July 15 in the journal Nature. (2020-07-15)

Yale Cancer Center study validates combination therapy for aggressive endometrial cancer
Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists have found that combining the targeted drug trastuzumab with chemotherapy significantly improves survival rates for women with a rare, aggressive form of endometrial cancer. These results may help to change the standard of care worldwide for the disease. The findings are published today in the journal Clinical Cancer Research. (2020-06-29)

WFIRM scientists prove bioengineered uteri support pregnancy
WFIRM scientists were able to show that bioengineered uteri in an animal model developed the native tissue-like structures needed to support normal reproductive function. (2020-06-29)

NIH-funded study links endometriosis to DNA changes
DNA from uterine cells of women with endometriosis has different chemical modifications, compared to the DNA of women who do not have the condition, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. The changes involve DNA methylation--the binding of compounds known as methyl groups to DNA--which can alter gene activity. (2020-06-17)

Artificial tissue used to research uterine contractions
Throughout an individual's lifetime, the uterus undergoes spontaneous contractions of the uterine wall, which can induce uterine peristalsis, a specific wavelike contraction pattern. These contractions are important for many reproductive processes, but hyperperistalsis could impede fertility and lead to diseases, such as adenomyosis or endometriosis. In an APL Bioengineering article, researchers present two mechanobiology tools for experiments on synthetic or artificial uterine tissue. They wanted to study the negative effects of hyperperistalsis. (2020-06-02)

MRI pregnancy study gives new insights into the all-important placenta
MRI research has revealed detailed new insights into how the placenta works in pregnancy and discovered a completely new phenomenon where the placenta contracts every now and then. (2020-05-28)

Imaging reveals unexpected contractions in the human placenta
High-resolution imaging of the human placenta provides new insights into blood circulation patterns that are crucial for fetal development, according to a study publishing May, 28 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Penny Gowland of the University of Nottingham, and colleagues. These findings improve our understanding of the functioning of this understudied organ, both in healthy pregnancies and in serious medical conditions such as pre-eclampsia. (2020-05-28)

DDT, other banned pesticides found in Detroit-area black women: BU study
A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study published in the journal Environmental Research finds detectable levels of DDE (what DDT becomes when metabolized in the body) and other banned organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in the blood of over 60 percent of a cohort of black women of reproductive age in the Detroit area, with higher levels in women who smoked cigarettes daily, drank more alcohol, and drank more water. (2020-05-06)

New targeted agent produces considerable responses in patients with uterine cancer
The DNA repair-blocking drug adavosertib shrinks tumors in nearly one-third of patients in clinical trial data to be shared at the Society for Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer. (2020-04-23)

Gene signature found for poor response to standard chemotherapy in rare uterine cancer
Women who don't survive a rare and aggressive uterine cancer called uterine serous carcinoma, have high expression of a group of 73 genes, a score scientists say can help identify these women and improve their outcome. (2020-04-22)

Human uterus colonized by clones with cancer-driving mutations that arise early in life
Many cells in the inner lining of the uterus carry 'cancer-driving' mutations that frequently arise early in life, report scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and their collaborators. The research team conducted whole-genome sequencing of healthy human endometrium, providing a comprehensive overview of the rates and patterns of DNA changes in this tissue. (2020-04-22)

Labor after previous cesarean should be considered
Labor after cesarean may be successful in over 90% of cases and thus may be considered a reasonable option for both mother and child, a study published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth suggests. When given detailed information on the risks and benefits associated with the different delivery options, expectant mothers were more likely to choose vaginal birth following a previous cesarean rather than repeat cesarean delivery. (2020-03-23)

New research shows promise to treat female group A streptococcus genital tract infections
Puerperal sepsis, also known as childbed fever, is the leading cause of maternal deaths. In this novel study in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, scientists report on the discovery of group A streptococcus (GAS) surface proteins involved in female reproductive tract infections such as puerperal sepsis that may pave the way to developing vaccines and more effective treatments. (2020-03-19)

Cancer survival rates improve for young adults
A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds improvements in five-year survival rates for all cancers in young adults. For some cancers, however, there has been little improvement since the 1970s. (2020-03-03)

Why is the female wallaby always pregnant?
Researchers show that female swamp wallabies ovulate, mate, and form a new embryo prepartum, while continuously supporting conceptuses and young at different development stages before and after birth. (2020-03-03)

Five-year survival improves for certain cancers in adolescent and young adults
The five-year survival rate for adolescents and young adults with cancer has significantly improved from 1975 to 2005 in the United States overall, but this was not the case for all cancers, according to a report in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2020-03-03)

MicroRNA regulates process vital to placenta growth in early pregnancy
A study by University of South Florida Health (USF Health) researchers discovered how a very large human non-protein coding gene regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) -- a process that contributes to placental implantation during early pregnancy, as well as cancer progression and spread. EMT plays a key role in proper placenta growth, critical to the health of the mother and her growing fetus. The USF Health team showed that robustly activating the chromosome 19 microRNA cluster using CRISPR technology inhibited EMT. (2020-02-25)

First Swedish transplant of uterus from deceased donor
The Swedish team responsible for uterine transplantation research has, for the first time, transplanted a uterus from a deceased donor. The operation proceeded without complications and the recipient is doing well. (2020-02-17)

New, detailed molecular roadmap boosts fight against endometrial cancer
Scientists have taken an unprecedented look at the proteins involved in endometrial cancer, commonly known as uterine cancer. The study offers insights about how physicians might be able to better identify which patients will need aggressive treatment and which won't, and offers clues about why a common cancer treatment is not effective with some patients. (2020-02-13)

Study surveys molecular landscape of endometrial cancer
The most comprehensive molecular study of endometrial cancer to date has further defined the contributions of key genes and proteins to the disease. (2020-02-13)

Utah researchers discover key protein in endometrial cancer growth
New research, published today in the journal Cancer Research, outlines findings scientists hope will advance our understanding of endometrial cancer and lead to more effective treatments. (2020-02-11)

Menopause timing hard to determine in every third woman
Is it possible to investigate menopausal age, or not? In more than one in three women aged 50, the body provides no clear answer about the menopause, Swedish study shows. Increased use of hormonal intrauterine devices and contraceptive pills are the cause. (2020-02-07)

Towards better anti-cancer drugs
The Bayreuth biochemist Dr. Claus-D. Kuhn and his research team have deciphered how the important human oncogene CDK8 is activated in cells of healthy individuals. Their findings, which have now been published in the journal 'Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A.', explain why promising anti-CDK8 drugs are only effective under laboratory conditions but likely not in humans. Gained results also show a new way of developing CDK8-specific drugs in the future. (2020-01-28)

Oral hormone-blocking drug may help with heavy menstrual bleeding
In women with uterine fibroids, the drug elagolix suppresses ovarian hormone production and prevents heavy menstrual bleeding. (2020-01-23)

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer
The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported. The news comes from Cancer Statistics, 2020, the latest edition of the American Cancer Society's annual report on cancer rates and trends. (2020-01-08)

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