Current Vaccinations News and Events

Current Vaccinations News and Events, Vaccinations News Articles.
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New research finds drive-through mass-vaccination clinics could alter COVID-19 trajectory
Policymakers at all levels of government are racing to vaccinate hundreds of millions of people to save lives and blunt the deadly COVID-19 pandemic. New research published in the INFORMS Journal on Applied Analytics provides a simulated model for drive-through clinics that can be used for mass COVID-19 vaccinations based on the successful use of such a clinic to address H1N1. (2021-02-17)

Study shows flu vaccine lessens COVID-19 symptoms in children
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered that children who receive a seasonal flu shot are less likely to suffer symptoms from a COVID-19 infection. The finding comes from a review of more than 900 children diagnosed with COVID-19 in 2020. (2021-02-04)

Repeated testing for COVID-19 is vital, economic and public health analysis shows
Epidemiologists at The University of Texas at Austin and other institutions have a new analysis that shows the value of having all people in the U.S. tested on a regular, rotating basis to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus and the loss of life from COVID-19. In a paper in The Lancet Public Health, the paper is relevant as the U.S. weighs options to control the spread of COVID-19 through increased testing. (2021-02-04)

Holonyak lab team creates fast, cheap, accessible COVID-19 antibody test
When COVID-19 began developing into a global crisis in early 2020, this research group was already working on an NIH-funded project to develop a ''flu chip'' that would rapidly determine the most likely cause of a fever by measuring several proteins within a droplet of blood. They decided to pivot their efforts to detect COVID-19 antibodies instead. (2021-02-01)

Forecast :125,000 fewer U.S. COVID deaths if 50% initiate vaccination by March 1
A new report combining forecasting and expert prediction data, predicts that 125,000 lives could be saved by the end of 2021 if 50% or more of the U.S. population initiated COVID vaccination by March 1, 2021. (2021-01-29)

The Lancet: Study estimates that, without vaccination against 10 diseases, mortality in children under five would be 45% higher in low-income and middle-income countries
Vaccinations against 10 major pathogens have a substantial impact on public health in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), according to new modelling research published in The Lancet. The study estimated that from 2000 to 2019 vaccinations have prevented 37 million deaths, and that this figure will increase to 69 million deaths for the period 2000-2030. Most of this impact is estimated to be among children younger than five years, most notably from measles vaccinations. (2021-01-28)

Hospital worker flu shots could mean fewer deaths
Research shows that state laws promoting flu vaccinations for hospital workers can substantially reduce the number of influenza-related deaths. (2021-01-26)

Smart vaccine scheme quick to curb rabies threat in African cities
More people could be protected from life-threatening rabies thanks to an agile approach to dog vaccination using smart phone technology to spot areas of low vaccination coverage in real time. The work could help save the lives of children worldwide. (2021-01-18)

How will SARS-CoV-2 severity change in the next decade?
What will the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak look like ten years from now as it passes from pandemic to endemic, maintained at a constant baseline level in populations without being fueled by outside infections? (2021-01-12)

Higher vaccine rates associated with indicative language by provider, more efficient
New research from Boston Medical Center finds that using clear, unambiguous language when recommending HPV vaccination both increases vaccine acceptance and increases conversation efficiency while preserving patient satisfaction. (2021-01-12)

Immune cells discovered in the lungs improve virus defense
A research team at the University of Basel has discovered immune cells resident in the lungs that persist long after a bout of flu. Experiments with mice have shown that these helper cells improve the immune response to reinfection by a different strain of the flu virus. The discovery could yield approaches to developing longer-lasting vaccinations against quickly-mutating viruses. (2021-01-08)

Voluntary or compulsory? New evidence on motivation for anti-COVID-19 policies
A study by the University of Konstanz shows that voluntary motivation to comply with anti-Covid-19 policies is relatively high in Germany, but can be undermined by enforcement -- the consequence of this finding differs depending on the policy. (2020-12-22)

How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected measles vaccination rates?
In a recent study published in Pediatrics, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital evaluated changes in measles vaccination rates from before the pandemic to this summer, when return for clinical care was encouraged. Finding a steep and lasting decline, the researchers are making efforts to improve timely vaccination and provide safe catch-up opportunities to children in their pediatric primary care network. (2020-12-17)

Pre-existing flu immunity impacts antibody quality following infection and vaccination
New research by scientists at the University of Chicago suggests a person's antibody response to influenza viruses is dramatically shaped by their pre-existing immunity, and that the quality of this response differs in individuals who are vaccinated or naturally infected. Their results highlight the importance of receiving the annual flu vaccine to induce the most protective immune response. (2020-12-11)

Americans must be vigilant against anti-vax rumors in 'fractured media universe'
As the world watches how UK residents respond to COVID-19 vaccinations, three leading experts on the virus are urging Americans and the US government to be vigilant against anti-vaccination advocates and their 'rumors, misinformation, and conspiracy theories in a fractured media universe.' (2020-12-10)

Study of virus attack rate in Manaus, Brazil, shows outcome of mostly unmitigated epidemic
Researchers studying data from blood donors in Manaus, Brazil, who experienced high mortality from SARS-CoV-2, estimate that more than 70% of the population was infected approximately seven months after the virus first arrived in the city. (2020-12-08)

Meningococcus B vaccine prevents disease with 79 per cent effectiveness in under-18s
Meningococcus group B, the most prevalent strain of meningococcal infection, is prevented with 79 per cent effectiveness in children and young adults inoculated with the 4CMenB vaccine, also known as Bexsero, according to a new collaborative study from researchers in Portugal and the UK and led by the University of Bristol which evaluated the vaccine's performance in a real-world setting. The findings are published today [1 December] in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). (2020-12-01)

Two out of three people would have a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available
Scientists at Keele University and King's College London have found that 64% of people would be likely to have a COVID-19 vaccination when one became available. (2020-11-26)

MMR vaccine could protect against COVID-19
The measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine has been theorized to provide protection against COVID-19. In a new study published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers provide further proof of this by showing that mumps IgG titers, or levels of IgG antibody, are inversely correlated with severity in recovered COVID-19 patients previously vaccinated with the MMR II vaccine produced by Merck (2020-11-20)

Study: TB vaccine linked to lower risk of contracting COVID-19
A widely used tuberculosis vaccine is associated with reduced likelihood of contracting COVID-19 (coronavirus), according to a new study by Cedars-Sinai. The findings raise the possibility that a vaccine already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration may help prevent coronavirus infections or reduce severity of the disease. (2020-11-20)

Flu vaccine rate less than 25% in young adults with heart disease, despite increased risk
In 2018, only about 25% of adults between the ages of 18 and 34 with any cardiovascular disease received a flu shot, and in those with a history of a heart attack, only about 20% were vaccinated. Study authors hope their results will increase awareness among cardiologists, primary care physicians and the public about the protective benefits of flu vaccination. (2020-11-09)

Recommendations for fair and regulated access to a COVID-19 vaccine
The first COVID-19 vaccines could be authorized as early as the start of 2021. However, in all likelihood, there will not be sufficient vaccine doses in the beginning for all the people willing to undergo vaccination. This is why prioritization will be necessary. In the position paper published today, medical-epidemiological aspects of infection prevention are presented alongside ethical, legal and practical considerations. On this basis, the authors develop a framework for action for the initial prioritization of vaccination measures against COVID-19. (2020-11-09)

Changes in health services use among commercially insured US populations during COVID-19 pandemic
Researchers examined whether the first two months of the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with changes in non-COVID health care use among a large population of individuals with employer-sponsored insurance, specifically preventive services (e.g., pediatric vaccinations), elective services (e.g., orthopedic surgery) and nonelective services (e.g., labor and delivery care) in March and April 2020 compared with the same months in 2018 and 2019. (2020-11-05)

Study shows COVID-19 risk to firefighters and emergency medical workers in New York City
Firefighters and emergency medical workers in New York City were 15 times more likely to be infected during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the general public, according to a study published in ERJ Open Research. (2020-10-29)

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are industrial chemicals that have been used for decades in several industrial processes and consumer products due to their special technical properties. They are not easily degradable and are now detectable everywhere: in the envi-ronment, in the food chain and in humans. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has published an opinion on health risks related to the presence of PFAS in food: http://www.efsa.europa. eu/de/news/pfas-food-efsa-assesses-risks-and-sets-tolerable-intake (2020-10-20)

Study: There's work to be done before people feel ready for COVID-19 vaccine
A new study in the journal Vaccines indicates some significant public messaging should be communicated before any COVID-19 vaccines are made available in the US. And with vaccines potentially being approved by the end of the year or early next year, the clock is ticking. (2020-10-13)

UArizona Health Sciences researchers identify new target for creating flavivirus vaccines
Antibodies normally fight viruses, but in the case of flaviviruses, they can make infections worse. UArizona Health Sciences immunologists took a closer look at antibody production to figure out why, which could lead to new methods of developing vaccines for flaviviruses. (2020-10-02)

1 in 3 parents plan to skip flu shots for their kids during COVID-19 pandemic
The pandemic doesn't seem to be changing parents' minds about the importance of the flu vaccine. (2020-09-28)

Vaccination insights
While scientists race to develop and test a vaccine effective against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, recent studies have indicated that countries with widespread BCG vaccination appear to be weathering the pandemic better than their counterparts. This has led many researchers to suspect that BCG vaccine, which immunizes against tuberculosis, might offer protection against COVID-19. (2020-09-21)

SHEA endorses requiring recommended vaccinations for healthcare personnel, educators and students
All healthcare personnel should be immunized against vaccine preventable diseases recommended by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (CDC/ACIP) as a condition of employment, according to a new policy statement by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The broad statement of support of the vaccination recommendations, published in the journal Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, suggests medical contraindications as the only exception to receiving recommended immunizations. (2020-09-17)

American Animal Hospital Association and American Association of Feline Practitioners release new Feline Vaccination Guidelines
The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) and the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) convened a panel of experts to update the 2013 AAFP Feline Vaccination Advisory Panel Report. The release of the 2020 AAHA/AAFP Feline Vaccination Guidelines provides updated recommendations and the most current information for feline vaccinations. (2020-09-01)

Swine flu vaccination in pregnant women did not increase risk of autism in offspring
Two recent studies were unable to rule out that H1N1 ('swine flu') vaccination ('Pandemrix') and seasonal influenza vaccination given to pregnant women might be associated with autism-spectrum disorder in the offspring. Now, a large study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, refutes any such association. (2020-08-31)

Vaccines against respiratory infections linked with less heart failure deaths
Influenza and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with fewer hospital deaths in patients with heart failure. That's the result of a study in nearly 3 million Americans released today at ESC Congress 2020. One out of five individuals will develop heart failure in their lifetime. An estimated 26 million people are affected worldwide. (2020-08-28)

Survey finds most parents nervous to take their kids for vaccinations due to COVID-19
Vaccination rates in the U.S. have plummeted amid COVID-19. A new national survey by Orlando Health finds while the vast majority of parents (84%) believe vaccines are the best way to protect their children from infectious diseases, two-thirds are still nervous to take their kids to their pediatrician's office due to COVID-19. (2020-08-12)

Iron deficiency during infancy reduces vaccine efficacy
About 40 percent of children around the globe suffer from anaemia because they do not consume enough iron. Now, studies by ETH researchers show that iron deficiency also reduces the protection provided by vaccinations. (2020-07-28)

Flu, pneumonia vaccinations tied to lower risk of Alzheimer's dementia
Flu (influenza) and pneumonia vaccinations are associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to new research reported at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference® (AAIC®) 2020. (2020-07-27)

Flu vaccine could protect against serious heart and stroke complications
The rate of seasonal flu vaccinations among people over age 50 and nursing home residents is extremely low, and those who do get the flu vaccine can significantly lower their risk of heart attack, TIA (transient ischemic attack), death and cardiac arrest. Flu vaccination in high-risk patients was associated with a 28% reduced risk of heart attack, a 47% reduced risk of TIA and a 73% reduced risk of death. (2020-07-27)

Breakthrough with cancer vaccine
Scientists have developed a new cancer vaccine with the potential to activate the body's immune system to fight a range of cancers, including leukaemia, breast cancer, lung cancer and pancreatic cancers. (2020-07-09)

Preliminary study suggests tuberculosis vaccine may be limiting COVID-19 deaths
While a direct correlation between BCG vaccinations and a reduction in coronavirus mortalities still needs to be understood more fully, researchers hold hope that the BCG vaccine might be able to provide at least short-term protections against severe COVID-19, particularly for front-line medical workers or high-risk patients. (2020-07-08)

Grassroots dog vaccinations can help stop rabies, but not alone
While scientists are trying to find a vaccine for COVID-19, the rabies virus continues to kill 59,000 people every year. But unlike COVID, a vaccine has existed for more than a century. Vaccinating dogs can stop the spread to humans, but systemic challenges make that easier said that done. In a new study, scientists where grassroots campaigns to stop rabies work-- and where they need to be coupled with large-scale efforts. (2020-07-02)

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