Current Vaccine News and Events | Page 24

Current Vaccine News and Events, Vaccine News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 24 of 25 | 1000 Results
Getting flu vaccine cuts risk of death by half in people with heart failure
For people with heart failure, getting a seasonal influenza (flu) vaccine in a given year was associated with a 50 percent drop in the risk of death during flu season and a 20 percent drop in the risk of death during the rest of the year, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. (2018-02-28)

NIAID unveils strategic plan for developing a universal influenza vaccine
Developing a universal influenza vaccine -- a vaccine that can provide durable protection for all age groups against multiple strains, including those that might cause a pandemic -- is a priority for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Writing in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, NIAID officials detail the Institute's new strategic plan for addressing the research areas essential to creating a safe and effective universal influenza vaccine. (2018-02-28)

Running rings around cholera outbreaks
Targeting vaccine and other interventions to those in the vicinity of people with cholera could be an effective way to control cholera outbreaks, which can have devastating effects after disasters and in other emergency settings, according to a research study by Flavio Finger, of the École Polytechnique Fédérale Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland and Andrew Azman, of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, USA and colleagues, published in PLOS Medicine. (2018-02-27)

Past encounters with the flu shape vaccine response
Researchers from the University of Chicago, Harvard University and others show that poor immune responses, not egg adaptions, may explain the low effectiveness of the vaccine that year. (2018-02-20)

TB vaccine trial results offer potential for BCG Revaccination, hope for subunit vaccines
Aeras, a nonprofit organization dedicated to developing vaccines against tuberculosis (TB), today announced results from an innovative clinical trial that provides encouraging new evidence that TB vaccines could prevent sustained infections in high-risk adolescents. In a prevention-of-infection Phase 2 trial conducted in South Africa, revaccination with the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine significantly reduced sustained TB infections in adolescents. An experimental vaccine candidate, H4:IC31, also reduced sustained infections, although not at statistically significant levels. (2018-02-19)

Stem cell vaccine immunizes lab mice against multiple cancers
Stanford University researchers report that injecting mice with inactivated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) launched a strong immune response against breast, lung, and skin cancers. The vaccine also prevented relapses in animals that had tumors removed. The work appears in the journal Cell Stem Cell on Feb. 15. (2018-02-15)

Heroin vaccine blocks lethal overdose
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have achieved a major milestone toward designing a safe and effective vaccine to both treat heroin addiction and block lethal overdose of the drug. (2018-02-13)

Measles vaccine increases child survival beyond protecting against measles
Analysis of more than 38,000 children in Ghana shows that all-cause mortality is significantly lower in children who received the measles vaccine after the third diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination. The study adds to growing evidence that, when administered in the WHO recommended sequence, measles vaccination provides non-specific benefits to child survival. The findings have implications for achieving the Millennium Development Goal 4 of reducing child mortality. (2018-02-12)

Chicken pox vaccine linked with shingles at the vaccination site in some children
New research in Pediatric Dermatology reports several cases of shingles that developed at the original vaccination site in healthy children after they were immunized against chicken pox. (2018-02-09)

Human antibodies undermine parasite sex
Some people develop an immune response following a malaria infection that stops them from infecting other mosquitos. The antibodies that these people produce are sucked up by the mosquito and destroy the malaria parasite in the mosquito's stomach. Researchers from Radboud university medical center discovered that 1 in 25 malaria patients prevent the disease from spreading in this way. They also unraveled the defense proteins responsible, and these could be used to make a vaccine. (2018-02-08)

Big data methods learn the fitness landscape of the HIV Envelope protein
Data scientists from the HKUST and their collaborators from MIT have employed a computational approach to estimate the fitness landscape of gp160, the polyprotein that comprises HIV's spike. The inferred landscape was then validated through comparisons with diverse experimental measurements. (2018-02-06)

Scientists report big improvements in HIV vaccine production
Research on HIV has led to many promising ideas for vaccines to prevent infection by the AIDS virus, but very few candidate vaccines have been tested in clinical trials. One reason is the technical difficulty of manufacturing vaccines based on the envelope proteins of the virus, according to vaccine expert Phil Berman, who has now developed new methods for the production of HIV vaccines. (2018-02-05)

Researchers take important step toward gonorrhea vaccine
Researchers are paving the way toward a new therapeutic approach for gonorrhea by shedding light on the mechanism behind important proteins on the Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria's outer membrane. (2018-02-05)

Rotavirus vaccine could reduce UK health inequalities, new study suggests
New research led by the University of Liverpool has found that childhood vaccination against rotavirus has greatest benefit in the most deprived communities and could contribute to reducing health inequalities in the UK. (2018-01-29)

Study: Site of 1st chlamydia exposure makes big difference
Exposing the gut to chlamydia protects against subsequent infection in the genital tract and other tissues, researchers from UT Health San Antonio discovered. Chlamydia is the nation's most common sexually transmitted disease and causes infertility, ectopic pregnancy and pelvic inflammatory disease if left untreated. (2018-01-26)

Nanoparticle vaccine offers universal protection against influenza a viruses, study finds
Researchers have developed a universal vaccine to combat influenza A viruses that produces long-lasting immunity in mice and protects them against the limitations of seasonal flu vaccines, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2018-01-24)

Flu infection study increases understanding of natural immunity
People with higher levels of antibodies against the stem portion of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein have less viral shedding when they get the flu, but don't have fewer or less severe signs of illness, according to a new study. This NIAID study is the first of its kind to evaluate pre-existing levels of these antibodies as a predictor of protection against influenza. The findings could have implications for flu vaccine development. (2018-01-23)

Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from disease
The vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study. (2018-01-22)

Improving vaccines for the elderly by blocking inflammation
By identifying why skin immunity declines in old age, a UCL-led research team has found that an anti-inflammatory pill could help make vaccines more effective for elderly people. The study, published today in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, found that an excessive inflammation reaction in older people can obstruct the immune system. (2018-01-22)

Boosting cancer therapy with cross-dressed immune cells
Researchers at EPFL have created artificial molecules that can help the immune system to recognize and attack cancer tumors. The study is published in Nature Methods. (2018-01-22)

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to advance public health measures. (2018-01-19)

The flu vaccine could get a much-needed boost
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help lower that figure for future flu seasons. (2018-01-18)

Fresh approach to TB vaccine offers better protection
A unique platform that resulted in a promising HIV vaccine has also led to a new, highly effective vaccine against tuberculosis that is moving toward testing in humans. The new vaccine completely protected 41 percent and reduced overall TB disease by 68 percent in vaccinated rhesus macaques, according to a study published as an Advanced Online Publication of Nature Medicine. (2018-01-17)

Antibodies show effectiveness for HIV prevention and promise for treatment and cure
Recent studies testing multivalent combinations of three broadly neutralizing antibodies, or bnAbs, have yielded promising results in animal models of HIV prevention. Two investigators at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill describe the potential of bnAbs to inform HIV prevention, treatment and cure strategies in a recent article in the New Journal of Medicine. (2018-01-17)

Re-programming innate immune cells to fight tuberculosis
Tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which attacks the lungs, claims someone's life every 20 seconds and 1.5 million lives worldwide every year. A cure has eluded scientists for more than a century but, now, a Montreal team of researchers may have discovered a new weapon to combat this global killer. The team is re-programing - or 'training' - immune cells to kill TB. These groundbreaking findings are published online today in the journal Cell. (2018-01-11)

More dentists to discuss risks of HPV-related cancers with their patients
The dental community is working to strengthen HPV prevention efforts, helping reduce the prevalence of oropharyngeal cancers. (2018-01-10)

Investigation raises concerns over poor quality, lack of regulation, and misrepresentation of animal research
An investigation published by The BMJ today has unearthed concerns about how researchers misrepresented the results of animal studies to gain funding and approval for human trials to test a new tuberculosis vaccine. (2018-01-10)

Nursing homes should require flu shots for all staff and patients, most older adults say
As flu season swings into high gear, a new poll suggests nursing homes and other long-term care facilities should be doing more to get their staff and patients vaccinated before it's too late. Nearly three-quarters of people over age 50 surveyed in a new poll say all staff in such facilities should definitely be required to get the flu vaccine. More than 60 percent say that patients in such facilities should definitely get vaccinated too. (2018-01-03)

T cell-inducing dengue vaccines may better protect children of vaccinated mothers
Although maternal antibodies help to protect babies against dengue virus infection, they can also be detrimental. In some situations, maternal antibodies can enhance the severity of dengue infections in babies or interfere with immunization of the babies. NUS Medicine researchers have now shown that, in the face of such complications, a dengue vaccine that provokes a strong killer T cell response in these children can provide better and broader protection than vaccines inducing mainly antibodies. (2017-12-22)

Duke-led team develops more accurate tool to track new HIV infections
Researchers at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute have led an effort to develop a more accurate way to gauge the incidence of HIV infections in large populations, which will improve research and prevention strategies worldwide. (2017-12-21)

Guidelines say no special precautions needed for flu shots for people allergic to eggs
An updated practice parameter from the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters stresses that people with egg allergy should receive their yearly flu shot, and that no special precautions are required. (2017-12-19)

Key to immune system's memory revealed
Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute scientists have defined a novel molecular 'blueprint' that plays a pivotal part in the immune system's ability to fight disease by 'remembering' infections. Understanding the fine detail of immunological memory potentially opens ways to improve, and to create new vaccines, and to hone treatments that use the immune system to fight disease including cancer. (2017-12-19)

New vaccine technology shows promise as a tool to combat the opioid crisis
An experimental heroin vaccine induced antibodies that prevented the drug from crossing the blood-brain barrier in mice and rats. (2017-12-18)

Dengue 'Achilles heel' insight offers hope for better vaccines
Researchers have new insights into how protective antibodies attack dengue viruses, which could lead to more effective dengue fever vaccines and drug therapies. The University of Queensland and China's ZhuJiang Hospital collaboratively led the study which identified an antibody that binds to, and kills, all four types of dengue virus. (2017-12-18)

Researchers discover how cells remember infections decades later
How do immune cells remember an infection or a vaccination so that they can spring into action decades later? Research led by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, has found that a small pool of the same immune cells that responded to the original invasion remain alive for years, developing unique features that keep them primed and waiting for the same microbe to re-invade the body. (2017-12-14)

UTHealth study finds that male virgins can still acquire HPV
Men who have never engaged in sexual intercourse are still at risk for acquiring HPV, according to a study published recently in the Journal of Infectious Diseases by researchers at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. (2017-12-13)

Immune cells turn back time to achieve memory
What distinguishes memory CD8 T cells from untrained naive cells is that they can respond rapidly, within minutes or hours. The new research illuminates how they do it -- their genes are poised to respond, even years after initial activation. (2017-12-13)

How well will the flu vaccine work this winter?
Scientists from UTMB and Biomed Protection predicted which H3N2 variants would become 'vaccine resistant', and this prediction has been confirmed during the 2017 Australian flu season. The results published suggest that the current flu vaccine will work better during the 2018 US flu season than the 2017 Australian flu season. (2017-12-13)

Typhoid fever toxin has a sweet tooth
Although the insidious bacterium Salmonella typhi has been around for centuries, very little is actually known about its molecular mechanisms. A new study from researchers at the College of Veterinary Medicine addresses this knowledge gap and may lead to novel, targeted treatments. (2017-12-11)

Single-dose vaccine could provide faster protection in cholera epidemics
Each year there are more than three million cases of cholera worldwide. Research at the University of Maryland School of Medicine now shows that giving a stronger single-dose of a live oral vaccine could be an effective tool in controlling outbreaks more quickly. (2017-12-11)

Page 24 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.