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Current Vaccine News and Events, Vaccine News Articles.
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Scientists reach new milestone in vaccine development for leishmaniasis
Researchers have taken an important step forward in developing a controlled human infection model to test leishmaniasis vaccines. (2021-01-11)

Breakthrough on diarrhea virus opens up for new vaccines
Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden have for the first time at the atomic level succeeded in mapping what a virus looks like that causes diarrhea and annually kills about 50,000 children in the world. The discovery may in the long run provide the opportunity for completely new types of treatments for other viral diseases such as COVID-19. (2021-01-11)

Nanoparticle vaccine for COVID-19
Researchers at Stanford are working to develop a single-dose vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 that could potentially be stored at room temperature. (2021-01-08)

Experts tap into behavioral research to promote COVID-19 vaccination in the US
Behavioral science and marketing researchers are laying out a range of strategies to help convince people to get vaccinated. (2021-01-07)

Treating an autoimmune disease in mice with an mRNA vaccine
Christina Krienke and colleagues have designed an mRNA vaccine that delayed the onset of and reduced the severity of multiple sclerosis-like disease in mice. (2021-01-07)

New defense against dengue and emerging mosquito-borne viruses
New treatments to cut the global death rate from dengue, Zika and West Nile viruses could result from research led by The University of Queensland. Associate Professor Daniel Watterson from UQ's School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences said the team identified an antibody that improved survival rates in laboratory trials and reduced the presence of virus in the blood. (2021-01-07)

Study: Black Americans, women, conservatives more hesitant to trust COVID-19 vaccine
A survey of approximately 5,000 Americans suggests that 31.1 percent of the US public does not intend to get the COVID-19 vaccine once it becomes available to them - and the likelihood of vaccine refusal is highest among Black Americans, women and conservatives. (2021-01-06)

Vaccine myths on social media can be effectively reduced with credible fact checking
Researchers found that fact-check tags located immediately below or near a social media post can generate more positive attitudes toward vaccines than misinformation alone, and perceived source expertise makes a difference. (2021-01-06)

Facebook posts help facilitate belief that HPV vaccine is dangerous to health
Social media has a history of being a popular place for sexual health discussions, and the HPV vaccine is one of the most discussed vaccines on the internet. Monique Luisi, an assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, suggests some HPV vaccine-related Facebook posts can help facilitate beliefs that the HPV vaccine is dangerous to one's health. She believes it could inform officials for the ongoing COVID-19 vaccine roll out and distribution. (2021-01-05)

COVID-19 generally 'mild' in young children: Evidence review
Babies and asymptomatic cases account for up to half of COVID-19 infections in the under-five age group, which has implications for vaccination programs, a new UNSW study has found. (2021-01-05)

Allergists offer reassurance regarding potential allergic reactions to COVID-19 vaccines
Reports of possible allergic reactions to COVID-19 vaccines have raised public concern; however, allergists note that allergic reactions to vaccines are rare, and COVID-19 vaccine allergic reactions will have a similarly low rate of occurrence. Individuals with a history of anaphylaxis to an injectable drug or vaccine containing polyethylene glycol or polysorbate should speak with an allergist before getting vaccinated, but patients with severe allergies to foods, oral drugs, latex or venom can safely receive the COVID-19 vaccines. (2020-12-31)

Published data from Moderna COVID-19 vaccine trial show 94.1 percent efficacy
Data from the COVE study, which evaluated mRNA-1273, a vaccine candidate against COVID-19 manufactured by Moderna, Inc., demonstrated 94.1 percent efficacy in preventing symptomatic COVID-19. (2020-12-30)

Peer-reviewed report on Moderna COVID-19 vaccine publishes
The investigational vaccine known as mRNA-1273 was 94.1% efficacious in preventing symptomatic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), according to preliminary results from a Phase 3 clinical trial reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. The vaccine also demonstrated efficacy in preventing severe COVID-19. Investigators identified no safety concerns and no evidence of vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD). (2020-12-30)

Pregnant women with COVID-19 pass no virus but fewer-than-expected antibodies to newborns
Pregnant women may be especially vulnerable to developing more severe cases of COVID-19, but little is known about their anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response or how it may affect their offspring. A new study provides new insights that could help improve care for these women and their newborns and emphasizes the need for pregnant women to be considered in vaccine rollout plans. (2020-12-22)

Global disparities in vaccination persist and leave many children at risk
Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, tens of millions of children worldwide were not receiving basic doses of vaccines. New research finds there continue to be significant disparities in childhood vaccination, and poorer children from under-represented and minority groups in most countries are more likely to be less fully vaccinated with all the recommended immunizations. A special supplement to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine looks at the barriers and challenges that limit or prevent access to vaccines in vulnerable children. (2020-12-22)

COVID immunity lasts up to 8 months, new data reveals
Australian researchers have revealed -- for the first time -- that people who have been infected with the COVID-19 virus have immune memory to protect against reinfection for at least eight months. The research is the strongest evidence for the likelihood that vaccines against the virus, SARS-CoV-2, will work for long periods. (2020-12-22)

ACP, Annals of Internal Medicine host virtual COVID-19 Vaccine Forum II for physicians
As COVID-19 vaccines are becoming available, physicians and other health care professionals must do the hard work of making sure sufficient numbers of people are vaccinated to end the pandemic. (2020-12-21)

UH Mānoa researcher examines why people choose to wear face coverings
A new study discovered key motivators on why people choose to wear face coverings amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-12-18)

New scientific study: Children falling behind on measles vaccinations
While the world witnessed impressive progress in immunizing children against measles between 2000 and 2010, the last 10 years have seen such efforts stalling in low- and middle-income nations, according to a new scientific study. (2020-12-16)

Two thirds of people with lupus would take COVID-19 vaccine, shows LRA survey
Two out of three people with lupus (64%) are willing to take a COVID-19 vaccine if it is free and determined safe by scientists according to results of a survey conducted by the Lupus Research Alliance (LRA). (2020-12-16)

Some states may lack facilities for administering COVID-19 vaccine to residents
As the biggest vaccination effort in US history gets underway, several states may not have a sufficient number of facilities in some areas to administer the COVID-19 vaccine to all residents who want it. Researchers with the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy and the nonprofit West Health Policy Center found that more than a third (35%) of US counties have two or fewer vaccination facilities per 10,000 residents. (2020-12-16)

Experimental vaccine can counter dangerous effects of synthetic cannabinoids
Made in clandestine laboratories and sold widely across the United States, the diverse class of drugs known as synthetic cannabinoids presents a growing public health threat. In a new study, Scripps Research scientists have devised a way to deactivate these designer drugs after they've been administered--offering a potential path for treating addiction and overdose. (2020-12-16)

Much of the world may not have access to a COVID-19 vaccine until 2022
Nearly a quarter of the world's population may not have access to a COVID-19 vaccine until at least 2022, warns a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-12-15)

Social media use increases belief in COVID-19 misinformation
The more people rely on social media as their main news source the more likely they are to believe misinformation about the pandemic, according to a survey analysis. The study also found that levels of worry about COVID-19 increased the strength of people's belief in that misinformation. Two factors weakened beliefs in false information: having faith in scientists and a preference for ''discussion heterogeneity,'' meaning people liked talking with others who held different beliefs. (2020-12-14)

How can we make sure people get the second COVID-19 vaccine dose?
The availability of COVID-19 will not necessarily result in people getting fully vaccinated, because the first vaccines to reach public use require two doses for full protection - and research has shown that many people never follow up on multi-dose vaccines or other multi-step preventive health practices. A researcher who has studied this effect comments on what it might take to solve the ''second dose problem.'' (2020-12-14)

One-step method to generate mice for vaccine research
To develop vaccines, scientists rely on a variety of animal models, including mice that can produce human antibodies through genetically engineered B cell receptors. These mice, however, often take several years to develop, requiring a complicated process of genetic modification and careful breeding. A Ragon Institute group has developed a one-step method, which uses CRISPR/Cas9 technology, to produce mice with genetically engineered human B cell receptors in just a few weeks. (2020-12-14)

Behavioral strategies to promote a national COVID-19 vaccine program
National efforts to develop a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine at 'warp speed' will likely yield a safe and effective vaccine by early 2021. However, this important milestone is only the first step in an equally important challenge: getting a majority of the U.S. public vaccinated. (2020-12-14)

Study: More than half unlikely to get COVID-19 vaccine under emergency use authorization
A new study led by a Virginia Commonwealth University professor is among the first to examine the psychological and social predictors of US adults' willingness to get a future COVID-19 vaccine and whether these predictors differ under an emergency use authorization release of the vaccine. (2020-12-14)

Vaccines must prevent infection, disease progression and transmission - in every country - to truly bring COVID-19 under control
An editorial co-authored by a member of the UK's influential SAGE committee that advises the UK Government on COVID-19, and published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) says that in order for the global COVID-19 vaccination program to be successful, the available vaccines must be able to do all three of: prevent infection becoming established in an individual, prevent disease progression and prevent onward transmission. (2020-12-14)

A protein has been identified as a potential therapeutic target for leishmaniasis vaccines
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), leishmaniasis causes between 20,000 and 30,000 deaths a year, and there is currently no vaccine for humans. A research team led by the Complutense University of Madrid has described the mechanism by which the Leishmania parasite avoids detection: through the SHP-1 protein, which is responsible for basic cellular functions. The finding positions this protein as a potential therapeutic target for the development of vaccines against the disease. (2020-12-11)

Pre-existing flu immunity impacts antibody quality following infection and vaccination
New research by scientists at the University of Chicago suggests a person's antibody response to influenza viruses is dramatically shaped by their pre-existing immunity, and that the quality of this response differs in individuals who are vaccinated or naturally infected. Their results highlight the importance of receiving the annual flu vaccine to induce the most protective immune response. (2020-12-11)

Americans must be vigilant against anti-vax rumors in 'fractured media universe'
As the world watches how UK residents respond to COVID-19 vaccinations, three leading experts on the virus are urging Americans and the US government to be vigilant against anti-vaccination advocates and their 'rumors, misinformation, and conspiracy theories in a fractured media universe.' (2020-12-10)

The ethics of human challenge trials
The first human challenge trial to test COVID-19 treatments and vaccines is set to begin in January in the United Kingdom. Daniel Hausman, a research professor at Rutgers Center for Population-Level Bioethics discussed the findings of his recently published paper in the Journal of Medicine & Philosophy examining ethical issues of challenge trials. (2020-12-09)

First peer-reviewed results of phase 3 human trials of Oxford vaccine show efficacy
Wits University scientists were amongst the co-authors who published the first peer-reviewed results of phase 3 human trials of the Oxford/AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine, in prestigious scientific journal The Lancet, on 8 December. Wits leads the SA leg of the Oxford Covid-19 vaccine trials. (2020-12-09)

The Lancet: New polio vaccine against strain that threatens eradication is safe and generates immune response in adults, young children, and infants
Scientists have developed the first poliovirus vaccine against a mutated form of the disease that is causing disease outbreaks across Africa and Asia. Designed to be more genetically stable than the licensed Sabin oral vaccine [1], the new vaccine appears to be as safe and provides similar immune responses when tested in healthy adults, children, and infants, according to new research published in two papers in The Lancet. (2020-12-09)

New method for evaluating vaccine safety
A research group at the University of Turku, Finland, has led the development of a new method to evaluate vaccine safety. The new method may significantly reduce the use of animal testing in the vaccine industry. (2020-12-08)

The Lancet: Oxford COVID-19 vaccine is safe and protects against disease, first published results from phase 3 trials
Interim results of the Oxford COVID-19 vaccine trials find that the vaccine protects against symptomatic disease in 70% of cases - with vaccine efficacy of 62% for those given two full doses, and of 90% in those given a half then a full dose (both trial arms pre-specified in the pooled analysis). The results are the first full peer-reviewed efficacy results to be published for a COVID-19 vaccine, and are published in The Lancet. (2020-12-08)

Mount Sinai researchers advance a universal influenza virus vaccine
A vaccine that induces immune responses to a wide spectrum of influenza virus strains and subtypes has produced strong and durable results in early-stage clinical trials in humans, Mount Sinai researchers have found. (2020-12-07)

Nursing researcher's experience in COVID-19 vaccine trial
This perspective is that of a nursing researcher turned volunteer in a COVID-19 vaccine trial. She considers the experience of study participants and how clinicians will need to prepare their patients for the vaccine's possible adverse effects. (2020-12-07)

Vaccination against tuberculosis can reduce the spread of COVID-19 and ease its course
St Petersburg University scientists have analysed about 100 academic papers and statistics on the incidence of COVID-19 in different countries of the world. Analysis of these data showed that the spread of the new coronavirus infection occurs more slowly where there is a large percentage of people vaccinated against tuberculosis with the BCG vaccine. Moreover, this vaccination itself, given in early childhood, changes the immune system in such a way that the new coronavirus disease course tends to be less severe. (2020-12-03)

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