Current Vaccines News and Events

Current Vaccines News and Events, Vaccines News Articles.
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New review compiles immunogenicity data on leading SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates
In a new Review, P.J. Klasse and colleagues present an extensive overview of the immunogenicity profiles of several leading SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates, including several developed under the auspices of (2021-02-19)

Targeting the SARS-CoV-2 main protease yields promise in transgenic mouse model
Inhibitors based on approved drugs and designed to disrupt the SARS-CoV-2 viral protein Mpro display strong antiviral activity both in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model, a new study reports. (2021-02-18)

An mRNA vaccine for cancer immunotherapy
Messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines to prevent COVID-19 have made headlines around the world recently, but scientists have also been working on mRNA vaccines to treat or prevent other diseases, including some forms of cancer. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed a hydrogel that, when injected into mice with melanoma, slowly released RNA nanovaccines that shrank tumors and kept them from metastasizing. (2021-02-17)

TB study reveals potential targets to treat and control infection
Researchers at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) at Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) may have found a new pathway to treat and control tuberculosis (TB), the disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Using single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq), a next-generation sequencing technology, scientists were able to further define the mechanisms that lead to TB infection and latency. (2021-02-16)

It's morally wrong for rich nations to hoard COVID-19 vaccine
Rich nations should not engage in ''vaccine nationalism'' and keep the COVID-19 vaccine to themselves when poorer nations need them, according to Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Hassoun's paper, ''Against Vaccine Nationalism,'' was published in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2021-02-16)

The Lancet: COVID-19 vaccination potential will not be achieved without increased production, affordable pricing, global availability, and successful rollout
Having new COVID-19 vaccines will mean little if people around the world are unable to get vaccinated in a timely manner. Vaccines have to be affordable and available to all countries, and governments must have the administrative and political capacities to deliver them locally to ensure an effective global immunisation strategy against COVID-19, say the authors of a Health Policy piece published in The Lancet. (2021-02-12)

New ACIP Adult Immunization Schedule recommends changes to several vaccines, includes interim recomm
The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has released its 2021 Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule that includes changes to several vaccines including influenza, hepatitis A, human papillomavirus (HPV); and the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. The schedule also includes interim recommendations for COVID-19 vaccination. The complete schedule, including changes in the vaccine notes section, is being simultaneously published in Annals of Internal Medicine and on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) web site. (2021-02-11)

Study predicts UK COVID-19 vaccination program will very quickly reduce deaths but more slowly bring down hospital and ICU admissions
A new modelling study published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that the UK's coronavirus vaccination program is already reducing daily deaths. However, reductions of hospital and intensive care (ICU) admissions will likely take several weeks longer, with large reductions seen by the end of March and continuing into April. (2021-02-11)

Biomaterials could mean better vaccines, virus-fighting surfaces
Advances in the fields of biomaterials and nanotechnology could lead to big breakthroughs in the fight against dangerous viruses like the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. In APL Bioengineering, researchers from the Indian Institute of Science describe possibilities being explored by scientists, combining biomaterials and nanotechnology, to make vaccines more effective and build surfaces that could fight and kill viruses on their own. (2021-02-09)

Vaccine confidence grows under new administration, latest CUNY SPH Survey reveals
Under the Biden Administration, New Yorkers' acceptance of the Covid-19 vaccine has increased significantly. In September, 55% of residents reported they would take the vaccine when it became available and this January, 64% reported they would take it. (2021-02-09)

Scientists urge for investment now in highly potent vaccines to prevent the next pandemic
In an article that appears in the journal Nature, Dennis Burton, PhD, and Eric Topol, MD, of Scripps Research call for governments to provide significant funding support for rational vaccine design based on broadly neutralizing antibodies. Such antibodies provide broad-spectrum potency against viruses, a valuable characteristic that opens the door to vaccines that could provide immunity against the many variants that might evolve from a fast-mutating virus. They could also be used as drugs to prevent and treat infections. (2021-02-09)

History of vaccines offers lessons on COVID-19 for pregnant women
DALLAS - Feb. 8, 2021 - Pregnant women, who are at increased risk of preterm birth or pregnancy loss if they develop a severe case of COVID-19, need the best possible guidance on whether they should receive a COVID-19 vaccine, according to an article by two UT Southwestern obstetricians published today in JAMA. That guidance can take lessons from what is already known about other vaccines given during pregnancy. (2021-02-08)

New AI tool can thwart coronavirus mutations
USC computer scientists used AI to create a new tool that rapidly identifies potential solutions to coronavirus mutations and screens vaccines much faster to give humans an advantage over the contagion. (2021-02-05)

Study highlights risk of new SARS-CoV-2 mutations emerging during chronic infection
SARS-CoV-2 mutations similar to those in the B1.1.7 UK variant could arise in cases of chronic infection, where treatment over an extended period can provide the virus multiple opportunities to evolve, say scientists. (2021-02-05)

The Lancet Public Health: Survey taken after France's first COVID-19 wave indicates almost one-third of working-age people could reject a vaccine
Nearly one in three working-age adults in France (29%) surveyed in July 2020 - when lockdown restrictions had been eased - were outright opposed to being vaccinated against the virus, according to new research published in The Lancet Public Health journal. (2021-02-05)

City, University of London academic tracks COVID-19 dark web marketplaces
New research carried out by Dr Andrea Baronchelli and his colleagues into the dark web marketplace (DWM) trade in products related to COVID-19, has revealed the need for the continuous monitoring of dark web marketplaces (DWMs), especially in light of the current shortage and availability of coronavirus vaccines. (2021-02-04)

COVID-19 vaccine from new vaccine platform effective in mice
It is necessary to develop additional COVID-19 vaccines, as different vaccine approaches have their advantages and disadvantages and may work synergistically. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now report that they have developed a prototype vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 using a DNA vaccine platform that is inexpensive, stable, easy to produce, and shows a good safety profile. A study published in Scientific Reports shows that the vaccine induces potent immune responses in mice. (2021-02-04)

Emory MVA COVID-19 vaccine safe and effective in animal models
Yerkes NPRC/Emory University researchers have developed a COVID-19 vaccine that has proven safe and effective in mice and monkeys. The Emory MVA COVID-19 vaccine uses modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) to induce strong neutralizing antibodies and killer CD8 T cells. Researchers say the vaccine is easily adaptable to address variants, can be used in combination with existing vaccines to improve their ability to combat variants and may be equally effective with a single dose. (2021-02-04)

City, University of London academic tracks COVID-19 dark web marketplace before vaccine
Dr Andrea Baronchelli, and colleagues have carried out insightful research into the dark web marketplace (DWM) trade in products related to COVID-19; they have revealed the need for the continuous monitoring of dark web marketplaces (DWMs) especially in light of the current shortage and availability of coronavirus vaccines. (2021-02-04)

Duration of antibody response varies among adults naturally reinfected with RSV
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine found that while most individuals responded to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) natural reinfection with a typical sustained antibody response associated with protection, a few individuals surprisingly responded atypically, not being able to sustain the antibody response, which declined to levels that made the individuals susceptible to RSV reinfection. (2021-02-04)

COVID-19 vaccination for patients with Parkinson's disease recommended
Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthcare professionals caring for them have expressed concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine's efficacy and safety in the specific context of PD and its symptomatic treatment. In a commentary just published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, a set of experts addresses these concerns from an evidence-based perspective. Their conclusion is that COVID-19 vaccination with approved vaccines should be recommended to persons with PD, unless there is a specific contraindication. (2021-02-03)

Intranasal influenza vaccine spurs strong immune response in Phase 1 study
An experimental single-dose, intranasal influenza vaccine was safe and produced a durable immune response when tested in a Phase 1 study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The investigational vaccine, called Ad4-H5-VTN, is a recombinant, replicating adenovirus vaccine designed to spur antibodies to hemagglutinin, a protein found on the surface of influenza viruses that attaches to human cells. (2021-02-03)

Engineering immunity
University of New Mexico researchers study the use of virus-like particles to create a stable and effective malaria vaccine. (2021-02-03)

The Lancet: Study reports preliminary efficacy and safety results from interim analysis of Russian COVID-19 phase 3 vaccine trial
An interim analysis of data from the phase 3 trial of the COVID-19 vaccine from Russia (Gam-COVID-Vac) suggests that a two-dose regimen of the adenovirus-based vaccine offers 91.6% efficacy against symptomatic COVID-19. The preliminary findings, published in The Lancet, are based on analysis of data from nearly 20,000 participants, three-quarters of whom received the vaccine and one quarter received a placebo. (2021-02-02)

Holonyak lab team creates fast, cheap, accessible COVID-19 antibody test
When COVID-19 began developing into a global crisis in early 2020, this research group was already working on an NIH-funded project to develop a ''flu chip'' that would rapidly determine the most likely cause of a fever by measuring several proteins within a droplet of blood. They decided to pivot their efforts to detect COVID-19 antibodies instead. (2021-02-01)

Deeper insight into how tick spit suppresses cattle immunity
A tick saliva study reveals immune responses that could lead to better protection for cattle. (2021-01-28)

New AI-severity score COVID-19 integrating CT images published to Nature Communications
Owkin, a French-American startup pioneering AI and Federated Learning in medical research, has been focusing it's COVID-19 research efforts on aspects of the pandemic that still require much public health attention, despite the arrival of an effective vaccine. Efforts to support frontline health systems as they devote their resources to the influx of COVID-19 related hospitalizations, have resulted in the AI-Severity Score, published in Nature Communications this week . (2021-01-28)

The Lancet: Study estimates that, without vaccination against 10 diseases, mortality in children under five would be 45% higher in low-income and middle-income countries
Vaccinations against 10 major pathogens have a substantial impact on public health in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), according to new modelling research published in The Lancet. The study estimated that from 2000 to 2019 vaccinations have prevented 37 million deaths, and that this figure will increase to 69 million deaths for the period 2000-2030. Most of this impact is estimated to be among children younger than five years, most notably from measles vaccinations. (2021-01-28)

Study introduces mRNA-LNP as a safe therapeutic intervention for liver regeneration
When severely or chronically injured, the liver loses its ability to regenerate. A new study led by researchers at the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center (BMC) now describes a safe new potential therapeutic tool for the recovery of liver function in chronic and acute liver diseases. (2021-01-27)

Vaccine delivered via skin could help in fight against respiratory diseases
Brigham's Thomas Kupper, MD, and co-authors present results from preclinical studies suggesting skin scarification may help generate lung T cells and provide protection against infectious diseases, with implications for prevention of COVID-19. (2021-01-27)

Hospital worker flu shots could mean fewer deaths
Research shows that state laws promoting flu vaccinations for hospital workers can substantially reduce the number of influenza-related deaths. (2021-01-26)

Researchers engineer antibody that acts against multiple SARS-like viruses
Researchers have engineered an antibody that neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 with a potency that 'rivals' current lead SARS-CoV-2 clinical neutralizing antibodies, and that also broadly neutralizes a range of clade 1 sarbecoviruses. (2021-01-25)

SARS-CoV-2 reacts to antibodies of virus from 2003 SARS outbreak, new study reveals
A new study demonstrates that antibodies generated by the novel coronavirus react to other strains of coronavirus and vice versa, according to research published today by scientists from Oregon Health & Science University. (2021-01-25)

Governments need to set clear rules for vaccinating health care workers against COVID-19
An analysis undertaken by Faculty of Law professors and a physician-researcher from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa feels provincial and territorial governments should set clear rules for vaccinating health care workers against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in public and private settings. (2021-01-25)

Rhesus macaques develop promising immune response to SARS-CoV-2
In a promising result for the success of vaccines against COVID-19, rhesus macaque monkeys infected with the human coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 developed protective immune responses that might be reproduced with a vaccine. (2021-01-22)

COVID-19 is dangerous for middle-aged adults, not just the elderly
COVID-19 has been spreading rapidly over the past several months, and the U.S. death toll has now reached 400,000. As evident from the age distribution of those fatalities, COVID-19 is dangerous not only for the elderly but for middle-aged adults, according to a Dartmouth-led study published in the European Journal of Epidemiology. (2021-01-21)

Age-based COVID-19 vaccine strategy that saves most lives prioritizes elderly, modeling shows
Vaccinating people over 60 is the most effective way to mitigate mortality from COVID-19, a new age-based modeling study suggests. (2021-01-21)

Why older adults must go to the front of the vaccine line
A new global, mathematical modeling study pubilshed in the journal Science shows that in most cases prioritizing older adults for COVID-19 vaccines saves the most lives. It also found that, in some cases, more lives could be saved and infections prevented if those who've already tested positive step to the back of the line. (2021-01-21)

Hope for a vaccination against Staphylococcus areus infections?
Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) ranks among the globally most important causes of infections in humans and is considered a dreaded hospital pathogen. Active and passive immunisation against multi-resistant strains is seen as a potentially valuable alternative to antibiotic therapy. However, all vaccine candidates so far have been clinically unsuccessful. With an epitope-based immunisation, scientists at Cologne University Hospital and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have now described a new vaccination strategy against S. aureus in the Nature Partner Journal NPJ VACCINES. (2021-01-20)

Incentivizing vaccine adherence: could it be the key to achieving herd immunity?
To achieve success, experts estimate that at least 70 to 90 percent of the population must be inoculated with a COVID-19 vaccine to achieve herd immunity, but how can we ensure folks will voluntarily receive a vaccine? An examination of scientific evidence on incentivizing vaccine adherence found that modest financial incentives resulted in as much as a 7-fold increase in adherence compared to no incentives. (2021-01-20)

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