Current Venus News and Events

Current Venus News and Events, Venus News Articles.
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The Milky Way may be swarming with planets with oceans and continents like here on Earth
According to a new study from the University of Copenhagen, Earth, Venus and Mars were created from small dust particles containing ice and carbon. The discovery opens up the possibility that the Milky Way may be filled with aquatic planets. (2021-02-22)

Venus flytraps found to produce magnetic fields
The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) is a carnivorous plant that encloses its prey using modified leaves as a trap. During this process, electrical signals known as action potentials trigger the closure of the leaf lobes. An interdisciplinary team of scientists has now shown that these electrical signals generate measurable magnetic fields. (2021-02-02)

Thick lithosphere casts doubt on plate tectonics in Venus's geologically recent past
A study of a giant impact crater on Venus suggests that its lithosphere was too thick to have had Earth-like plate tectonics, at least for much of the past billion years. (2021-01-28)

The seven rocky planets of TRAPPIST-1 seem to have very similar compositions
A new international study led by astrophysicist Eric Agol from the University of Washington has measured the densities of the seven planets of the exoplanetary system TRAPPIST-1 with extreme precision, the values obtained indicating very similar compositions for all the planets. This fact makes the system even more remarkable and helps to better understand the nature of these fascinating worlds. This study has just been published in the Planetary Science Journal. (2021-01-22)

The most consumed species of mussels contain microplastics all around the world
''If you eat mussels, you eat microplastics.'' This was already known to a limited extent about mussels from individual ocean regions. A new study by the University of Bayreuth reveals that this claim holds true globally. (2020-12-17)

Device mimics life's first steps in outer space
A device developed by scientists at the CY Cergy Paris University and Paris Observatory promises insight into how the building blocks of life form in outer space. In Review of Scientific Instruments, the scientists detail how VENUS -- an acronym of the French phrase ''Vers de Nouvelles Syntheses,'' which means ''toward new syntheses'' -- mimics how molecules come together in the freezing darkness of interstellar space. (2020-12-15)

Powerful electrical events quickly alter surface chemistry on Mars, other planetary bodies
On Earth, dust particles are viewed mainly in terms of their physical effects, like erosion. But, in exotic locales from Mars to Venus to Jupiter's icy moon Europa, electrical effects can affect the chemical composition of a planetary body's surface and atmosphere in a relatively short time, according to new research from Washington University in St. Louis. (2020-12-14)

The pressure sensor of the venus flytrap
The display of a smartphone reacts to finger pressure. The carnivorous Venus flytrap, on the other hand, even notices when a lightweight like a fly lands on it. Special genes make this possible. (2020-12-11)

Almost like on Venus
A team of international scientists led by ETH researcher Paolo Sossi has gained new insights into Earth's atmosphere of 4.5 billion years ago. Their results have implications for the possible origins of life on Earth. (2020-11-25)

To survive asteroid impact, algae learned to hunt
Tiny, seemingly harmless ocean plants survived the darkness of the asteroid strike that killed the dinosaurs by learning a ghoulish behavior -- eating other living creatures. (2020-10-30)

Shot of alcohol can help an irregular heartbeat
Research out in this week's issue of JAMA confirms the success of a treatment for persistent atrial fibrillation (AFib) that combines the standard treatment, catheter ablation, with a separate infusion of ethanol, or alcohol, to the vein of Marshall. (2020-10-28)

Two planets around a red dwarf
The 'SAINT-EX' Observatory, led by scientists from the National Centre of Competence in Research NCCR PlanetS of the University of Bern and the University of Geneva, has detected two exoplanets orbiting the star TOI-1266. The Mexico-based telescope thus demonstrates its high precision and takes an important step in the quest of finding potentially habitable worlds. (2020-10-16)

Memory of the Venus flytrap
In a study to be published in Nature Plants, a graduate student Mr. Hiraku Suda and Professor Mitsuyasu Hasebe of the National Institute for Basic Biology (NIBB) in Okazaki, Japan, together with their colleagues, have succeeded in visualizing intracellular calcium concentrations in the Venus flytrap and have demonstrated that its short-term memory can indeed be explained by changes in calcium concentration. (2020-10-05)

Venus might be habitable today, if not for Jupiter
Venus might not be a sweltering, waterless hellscape today, if Jupiter hadn't altered its orbit around the sun, according to new UC Riverside research. (2020-09-30)

Venus' ancient layered, folded rocks point to volcanic origin
An international team of researchers has found that some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, have layering that seems consistent with volcanic activity. The finding could provide insights into the enigmatic planet's geological history. (2020-09-17)

Phosphine on Venus
An international team of astronomers detected phosphine (PH3) in the atmosphere of Venus. They studied the origin of phosphine, but no inorganic processes, including supply from volcanos and atmospheric photochemistry can explain the detected amount of phosphine. The phosphine is believed to originate from unknown photochemistry or geochemistry, but the team does not completely reject the possibility of biological origin. This discovery is crucial to examine the validity of phosphine as a biomarker. (2020-09-15)

Hints of life on Venus
An international team of astronomers, led by Professor Jane Greaves of Cardiff University, today announced the discovery of a rare molecule - phosphine - in the clouds of Venus. On Earth, this gas is only made industrially, or by microbes that thrive in oxygen-free environments. The detection of phosphine molecules, which consist of hydrogen and phosphorus, could point to extra-terrestrial 'aerial' life. (2020-09-14)

Possible marker of life spotted on venus
An international team of astronomers today announced the discovery of a rare molecule -- phosphine -- in the clouds of Venus. On Earth, this gas is only made industrially or by microbes that thrive in oxygen-free environments. Astronomers have speculated for decades that high clouds on Venus could offer a home for microbes -- floating free of the scorching surface but needing to tolerate very high acidity. The detection of phosphine could point to such extra-terrestrial 'aerial' life. (2020-09-14)

New landmine detection method to reduce false alarm rates
Landmines pose a serious threat in conflict areas, yet modern detection systems struggle to discriminate between explosives and clutter. A project funded by the Army developed a new method for landmine identification that will greatly reduce false alarm rates. (2020-08-18)

The Venus 'ring of fire'
ETH researchers used computer simulations to classify the current activity of corona structures on the surface of Venus. To their surprise, they found a previously undiscovered ring of fire on our neighbouring planet. (2020-07-21)

Scientists discover volcanoes on Venus are still active
A new study identified 37 recently active volcanic structures on Venus. The study provides some of the best evidence yet that Venus is still a geologically active planet. A research paper on the work, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland and the Institute of Geophysics at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, was published in the journal Nature Geoscience. (2020-07-20)

How Venus flytraps snap
Venus flytraps catch spiders and insects by snapping their trap leaves. This mechanism is activated when unsuspecting prey touch highly sensitive trigger hairs twice within 30 seconds. A study led by researchers at the University of Zurich has now shown that a single slow touch also triggers trap closure - probably to catch slow-moving larvae and snails. (2020-07-10)

Neptune-sized planet discovered orbiting young, nearby star
Research published today in Nature reports the discovery of a planet about the size of Neptune orbiting an especially young, nearby star. There are only two or three known stars that are both nearby and young, and this is the first planet scientists have discovered orbiting one of them. This means the new finding creates a major opportunity for breakthrough research into the dynamics of how solar systems form, including our own Milky Way. (2020-06-24)

Virtually captured
The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) takes only 100 milliseconds to trap its prey. Once their leaves, which have been transformed into snap traps, have closed, insects can no longer escape. Using biomechanical experiments and virtual Venus flytraps a team from Freiburg Botanical Garden and the University of Stuttgart has analyzed in detail how the lobes of the trap move. (2020-06-23)

Scientists carry out first space-based measurement of neutron lifetime
Scientists have found a way of measuring neutron lifetime from space for the first time -- a discovery that could teach us more about the early universe. (2020-06-11)

Scientists present new method for remote sensing of atmospheric dynamics
Physicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a new method for wind speed remote measurements. It may complement the widely employed lidar and radar sensing techniques. (2020-06-10)

The carnivorous plant lifestyle is gene costly
The genomes of three carnivorous plants -- the Venus flytrap, spoon-leaved sundew and the waterwheel plant -- have been decoded. The result has caused some surprises. (2020-05-14)

Thermal tides cause Venus' atmosphere to rotate far faster than its surface
By tracking the thick clouds of Venus' rapidly rotating atmosphere, researchers have gained new insight into the dynamic forces that drive atmospheric super-rotation - a little-understood phenomenon in which an atmosphere rotates much faster than the solid planetary body below. (2020-04-23)

Atmospheric tidal waves maintain Venus' super-rotation
An international research team led by Takeshi Horinouchi of Hokkaido University has revealed that the 'super-rotation' on Venus is maintained near the equator by atmospheric tidal waves formed from solar heating on the planet's dayside and cooling on its nightside. The study was published online in Science on April 23. (2020-04-23)

A new tool to predict volcanic eruptions
Earth's atmosphere is made up of 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen, a mixture that is unique in the solar system. But where did the nitrogen come from? Did it escape from Earth's mantle through volcanic activity? To try to answer these questions, CNRS researcher Jabrane Labidi and his colleagues collected samples of gas from several volcanic sites. Their highly precise data could help to predict future volcanic eruptions. (2020-04-15)

What is the origin of water on Earth?
Led by Cédric Gillmann -- Université libre de Bruxelles, ULB, funded by the EoS project ET-HoME, a team of researchers demonstrate that the water we are now enjoying on Earth has been there since its formation. Published on Nature Geoscience, this idea has very deep implications in terms of habitability of ancient Earth, Venus and Mars, as it suggests that planets likely formed with their near-full budget in water, and slowly lost it with time. (2020-04-10)

Earth's mantle, not its core, may have generated planet's Early magnetic field
A trio of studies are the latest developments in a paradigm shift that could change how Earth history is understood. They support an assertion by a Scripps Institution of Oceanography geophysicist that a once-liquid portion of the lower mantle, rather than the core, could have exceeded the thresholds needed to create Earth's magnetic field during its early history. (2020-03-15)

Earth's cousins: Upcoming missions to look for 'biosignatures' in exoplanet atmospheres
University of Washington astronomer Victoria Meadows answers questions about characterizing the atmospheres of terrestrial and potentially Earth-like exoplanets, and searching for signs of life on these worlds, ahead of her talk at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Seattle. Meadows will present in the 'Detecting Life and Extraterrestrial Technologies' session, which begins at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 15. (2020-02-14)

Trinity scientists engineer 'Venus flytrap' bio-sensors to snare pollutants
The biological sensors change color once they have successfully snared a target molecule, and will soon have a host of important environmental, medical and security applications. (2019-11-19)

'Are we alone?' Study refines which exoplanets are potentially habitable
Researchers are first to combine 3D climate modeling with atmospheric chemistry to explore the habitability of planets around M dwarf stars, which comprise about 70% of the total galactic population. (2019-11-14)

The most spectacular celestial vision you'll never see
Contrary to previous thought, a gigantic planet in wild orbit does not preclude the presence of an Earth-like planet in the same solar system - or life on that planet. What's more, the view from that Earth-like planet as its giant neighbor moves past would be unlike anything it is possible to view in our own night skies on Earth. (2019-11-05)

Chameleon's tongue strike inspires fast-acting robots
Purdue University researchers were inspired by a chameleon's tongue to create soft robots able to quickly catch a live flying beetle. Fabricated robots capable of performing such large-amplitude motions at high speed like chameleons could mean many automated tasks could be completed more accurately and in a much faster way. (2019-10-29)

Science shows hype about your opponent actually messes with your game
A study of more than 117,000 pro tennis matches and more than 5 million observations in online amateur chess indicates that even when competitors are evenly matched, players perform worse against an opponent they know has been climbing in rank. (2019-10-28)

No escape for mosquitoes
Venus flytraps are capable of detecting the movements of even the smallest insects. This mechanism protects the plant against starving from hyperactivity as a new study conducted by scientists from Würzburg and Cambridge reveals. (2019-07-08)

NASA's TESS mission finds its smallest planet yet
NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) has discovered a world between the sizes of Mars and Earth orbiting a bright, cool, nearby star. The planet, called L 98-59b, marks the tiniest discovered by TESS to date. (2019-06-27)

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