Current Veterans News and Events

Current Veterans News and Events, Veterans News Articles.
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Gulf war illness not caused by depleted uranium from munitions, study shows
Inhalation of depleted uranium from exploding munitions did not lead to Gulf War illness (GWI) in veterans deployed in the 1991 Persian Gulf War, a new study co-authored by a leading researcher of the disease at UT Southwestern suggests. The findings, published today in Scientific Reports, help eliminate a long-suspected cause of GWI that has attracted international concern for three decades. (2021-02-18)

The messenger matters in safe gun storage, suicide prevention education
Law enforcement and those in the military, rather than doctors and celebrities, are the most preferred messengers on firearm safety, a Rutgers study found. (2021-02-18)

Vets' depression, social support & psychological resilience play role in later well being
Veterans who experienced the combination of low depression, high social support and high psychological resilience as they left military service were most likely to report high well-being a year later. (2021-02-17)

Drinking, smoking, and drug use linked to premature heart disease in the young
Recreational drinking, smoking, and drug use is linked to premature heart disease in young people, particularly younger women, finds research published online in the journal Heart. (2021-02-15)

Solving a puzzle
University of New Mexico scientists tease out the underlying mechanism of tuberous sclerosis complex (2021-02-03)

Delaying colonoscopy following abnormal stool test increases risk of colorectal cancer
A new VA study finds that delays in undergoing colonoscopy following an abnormal stool test increase the risk of a colorectal cancer diagnosis and cancer-related death. The findings showed the risk of colorectal cancer-related death increased by up to 1.5 times when colonoscopy was delayed more than 19 months. (2021-02-02)

Year delay between abnormal, at-home screening and colonoscopy increases cancer risk
A new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found delayed time between abnormal stool-based screening and subsequent colonoscopy was associated with an increased risk of a cancer diagnosis and death from colorectal cancer. (2021-02-02)

Data shows strain on ICU capacity leads to more deaths during COVID-19 pandemic
New research from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine shows that people treated in the ICU for COVID-19 are twice as likely to die when the ICU capacity is strained by the number of COVID-19 patients. Strain on hospital capacity has been associated with increased mortality under normal circumstances. This study provides evidence that the same is true during the current pandemic. (2021-02-01)

Genetic analysis of symptoms yields new insights into PTSD
A new study led by researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Diego (UCSD) uncovers intriguing genetic similarities between PTSD and other mental health disorders such as anxiety, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The findings also suggest that existing drugs commonly used for other disorders might be modified to help treat individual symptoms of multiple disorders. (2021-01-28)

Genomic studies implicate specific genes in post-traumatic stress disorder
After analyzing the genomes of more 250,000 military veterans, researchers have identified 18 specific, fixed positions on chromosomes that appear associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. The findings may point to new therapeutic drug targets. (2021-01-28)

Confirmed improvement in first responders' brain health after shortened training protocol
People believe that they can't change their brains, or their brain health will decline as they age. But the SMART training protocol, created by researchers and clinicians at the Center for BrainHealth®, has demonstrated over the past two decades to improve cognitive function and psychological well-being in laboratory participants. Research suggests that SMART can even make long-lasting improvements to people's brain health when given outside of the lab in short, informal training sessions (2021-01-27)

Mouse study identifies novel compound that may help develop diabetes drugs
Research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine identified a new compound that might serve as a basis for developing a new class of drugs for diabetes. Study findings are published online in the journal Nature Chemical Biology. (2021-01-26)

For veterans after suicide attempts, gender affects recovery needs
What care do veterans need when recovering after suicide attempts? The answer may be different for women compared to men veterans, reports a qualitative study in Medical Care, part of a special issue devoted to new research on suicide risk and prevention in women. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2021-01-25)

When -- not what -- obese mice ate reduced breast cancer risk
University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center researchers report that intermittent fasting reduced breast cancer risk in obese mice. (2021-01-25)

AI algorithms detect diabetic eye disease inconsistently
In a paper published Jan. 5 in Diabetes Care, researchers compared seven algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy against the diagnostic expertise of retina specialists. (2021-01-05)

Despite recommendations, patients with treatment-resistant hypertension rarely tested for primary al
A retrospective cohort study found that testing for primary aldosteronism in patients with treatment-resistent hypertension was rare and also associated with higher rates of evidence-based treatment and better longitudinal blood pressure control. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-12-28)

Brain tissue yields clues to causes of PTSD
A post-mortem analysis of brain tissue from people who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may help explain enduring mysteries about the disorder, such as why women are more susceptible to it and whether a dampened immune system response plays a role in dealing with stress, a team headed by Yale University researchers has found. (2020-12-21)

First 10 days after leaving hospital carry high risk for COVID-19 patients, study finds
In the first months after their COVID-19 hospital stay, patients face a high risk of ongoing health problems, hospital readmission and death, a growing number of studies shows. But the first week and a half may be especially dangerous, a new study finds. COVID-19 patients had a 40% to 60% higher risk of readmission or death in the first 10 days, compared with similar patients treated during the same months for heart failure or pneumonia. (2020-12-14)

The un-appeal of banana: liquid e-cigarette flavorings measurably injure lungs
UC San Diego researchers report chemicals used for flavor in e-cigarette liquid negatively affect specialized proteins that support immune system. (2020-12-14)

New review confirms disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on Black, Hispanic populations
Black and Hispanic populations are disproportionately affected by COVID-19, according to a systematic review published this week. The disparities were likely related to minority populations being at higher risk of exposure to the coronavirus as opposed to underlying health conditions or other factors, according to the review led by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and the VA Portland Health Care System. (2020-12-03)

Women veterans with PTSD have higher rate of heart disease
Women veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were 44% more likely to develop ischemic heart disease including heart attacks, compared to those without PTSD. The increased risk was most prominent in younger women (below the age of 40). (2020-11-09)

Higher fitness levels linked to lower AFib risk in male, African American veterans
Higher fitness levels reduced the risk of developing an irregular heart rhythm, known as atrial fibrillation or AFib, by 30% to 50% in a study of male, African American veterans. Although only male, African American veterans were included in the study, researchers note the results suggest physical activity may reduce the risk of developing AFib among all adults. (2020-11-09)

Brain magnetic stimulation for veterans with concussion: Need is high, but evidence is limited
Studies using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a noninvasive technique, to help veterans and active-duty service members living with depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other lasting consequences of concussion have shown promise. However, there's an urgent need for studies designed to address the unique patterns of post-concussion symptoms seen in military populations, concludes a review in the November/December issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). (2020-11-05)

Study finds PTSD interacts with klotho gene, may cause premature aging in the brain
Genetics and the environment (including psychiatric stress) may contribute to the pace of cellular aging, causing some individuals to have a biological age that exceeds their chronological age. (2020-10-26)

Neuron-based gene expression study reveals insights on fear and its regulation
The expression of a gene called CREB in certain neurons may function as a switch to regulate feelings of fear and its extinction. (2020-10-26)

Conversation about suicide prevention leads to safe gun storage
Research by Forefront Suicide Prevention at the University of Washington, from visits to 18 gun shows and other community events around Washington state last year, found that engaging people in a community-based setting, in an empathetic conversation focused on safety, resulted in more people locking up their firearms. (2020-10-20)

New study to assess pandemic's impact on Canadian veterans and their spouses
Lawson Health Research Institute and the Centre of Excellence on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are partnering with a population at high risk of mental illness - Canadian Veterans and spouses of Canadian Veterans - to study how they have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Through online surveys, the project will hear directly from Veterans and their spouses to assess the pandemic's effects on their wellbeing over time. (2020-10-15)

A diet high in prunes prevents bone loss associated with spinal cord injuries
Findings from a new study among mice show a diet high in dried plum (prunes) completely prevents bone loss associated with spinal cord injury (SCI), while also restoring some of the bone lost following SCI. (2020-10-06)

Acupuncture before surgery means less pain, significantly fewer opioids for Veterans
Veterans who have acupuncture before surgery report less pain and need far fewer opioids to manage their discomfort, according to a randomized, controlled study being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2020 annual meeting. Veterans who received acupuncture also reported they were more satisfied with their pain control than those who did not. (2020-10-05)

Nurture trumps nature in determining severity of PTSD symptoms
Researchers at Yale and elsewhere previously identified a host of genetic risk factors that help explain why some veterans are especially susceptible to the debilitating symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2020-10-01)

Why do veterans take their own lives? New study finds surprising answers
A George Mason University study of US veterans found that while social determinants of health - like homelessness, social isolation, or unemployment -- can predict suicide, they are not the cause of it. Mental illness leads to both adverse life events, such as social isolation and suicide, creating the incorrect appearance that adverse events cause suicide. Dr. Farrokh Alemi led the study that suggests the importance of addressing the root cause of suicide and self-harm: mental illness. (2020-09-29)

VA Boston and BU researchers streamline PTSD diagnosis with machine learning
Now, researchers from the VA Boston Healthcare System and the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) have used machine learning to explore streamlining the ''gold standard'' diagnostic tool for PTSD. (2020-09-29)

Cannabis use for menopause symptom management
CLEVELAND, Ohio (September 28, 2020)--As legislation relaxes regarding cannabis, it is being used to manage numerous chronic health conditions and mood symptoms. A new study indicates that a growing number of women are either using cannabis or want to use it for the management of bothersome menopause symptoms. Study results will be presented during the 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), which opens on September 28. (2020-09-28)

New abdominal aortic aneurysm genes identified, could help pinpoint those at risk
A study of US veterans identified 14 genes that may predict the risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm. The related-risk score identifies those at risk regardless of known factors such as smoking or family history. Diastolic blood pressure, the bottom number in a blood pressure reading, may be a better indicator of developing abdominal aortic aneurysm. (2020-09-28)

Risk factors for hospitalization, mechanical ventilation or death among patients with SARS-CoV-2
This observational study used data from the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system to examine what risk factors are associated with hospitalization, mechanical ventilation and death among patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. (2020-09-23)

Black and Hispanic people in US face increased risk of testing positive for coronavirus
Individuals from Black and Hispanic backgrounds in the United States are twice as likely to test positive for COVID-19 than their White counterparts, according to new research in PLOS Medicine. Led by researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and Yale University, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the study found this disparity even after accounting for factors such as underlying health conditions, where they live and where they receive care. (2020-09-22)

OHSU-VA research suggests strategies to reduce missed appointments
New research from Oregon Health & Science University and the VA Portland Health Care System suggests that a little finesse and a thoughtful approach could go a long way toward reducing a vexing problem in the health care system: missed appointments. (2020-09-17)

Study offers real world perspective on how Black patients experience mental healthcare
In a novel study the authors hope will contribute to improved patient care, Richard L. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Regenstrief Institute researchers examine how Black patients with mental health concerns evaluate verbal and non-verbal communication during treatment. The researchers, led by Johanne Eliacin, PhD, evaluate how perceptions of racial bias influence patient engagement with their providers. (2020-09-15)

PTSD may double risk of dementia
People who have experienced post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are up to twice as likely to develop dementia later in life, according to a new study by UCL researchers, published in the British Journal of Psychiatry. (2020-09-15)

Factors associated with suicide risk after leaving military service
This observational study investigated demographic and military service characteristics associated with suicide risk among US veterans after the transition from active military service to civilian life. (2020-09-11)

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