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Current Viability News and Events, Viability News Articles.
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Pinpointing rare disease mutations
Scientists have compiled mouse and human cell knockout data to categorise genes based on how essential they are for survival and organism development. The research creates a resource that can be used by other scientists to further investigate candidate genes potentially involved in developmental disorders. The work could help identify new mutations causing rare genetic diseases. (2020-01-31)

NYUAD researchers develop new approach to more efficiently store and preserve human cells
Researchers from the Division of Engineering at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) have developed a new technique that utilizes filter paper to cryopreserve human cells, offering scientists an efficient alternative to conventional, long-term cryopreservation methods. (2020-01-29)

The Blue Acceleration: Recent colossal rise in human pressure on ocean quantified
Human pressure on the world's ocean accelerated sharply at the start of the 21st century and shows no sign of slowing, according to a comprehensive new analysis on the state of the ocean. Scientists have dubbed the dramatic rise the ''Blue Acceleration''. The researchers from the Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, synthesized 50-years of data from shipping, drilling, deep-sea mining, aquaculture, bioprospecting and much more. The results are published in the journal One Earth, 24 January. (2020-01-24)

EU project RES URBIS shows the viability of bioplastic generation with urban biowaste
In a circular economy the city waste being turned into resources, is of great importance considering more than 70% of the inhabitants in Europe live in urban areas. The European project RES URBIS (Resources from Urban Bio-waste), showed that different biowaste produced in an urban environment can be treated within the same chain of valorisation and can obtain products with biological origins, such as bioplastic, with a higher economic value to the classic compost and biogas. (2020-01-13)

SUTD scientists developed a sorting technology that isolates cells with high purity and viability
SUTD researchers developed a sheathless acoustic fluorescence activated cell sorting (aFACS) system by combining elasto-inertial cell focusing and highly focused traveling surface acoustic wave to sort cells with high recovery rate, purity, and cell viability. This novel microfluidic system provides a promising solution for single-cell level detection and isolation in biomedical applications that require sorted cells to be viable and functional for follow-on analysis and handling. (2019-12-16)

New technique to identify a common cause to TMA diseases for which there is a treatment
Researchers have developed a technique that allows detecting an anomaly in the alternative pathway of the complement system, a part of our immune system that if deregulated can attack the patient's own endothelial cells and cause thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), a severe injury common to a diversity of diseases. If the pathway is altered, the drug that is used for a syndrome with good prognostic could be used in other range of TMA-related diseases. (2019-11-08)

Scientists can replace metal collimators with plastic analogs
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University conducted studies of plastic collimators, which can replace their metal analogs used in radiation therapy. At the first stage, the research team was involved in the exact characteristics of the desired product, its development, and testing. The study will be interesting for both medicine and everyone who is interested in the effect of radiation on plastic products. The results were published in Physica Medica (IF: 2.54, Q1). (2019-11-06)

Soil on moon and Mars likely to support crops
Researchers at Wageningen University & Research in the Netherlands have produced crops in Mars and moon soil simulant developed by NASA. The research supports the idea that it would not only be possible to grow food on Mars and the moon to feed future settlers, but also to obtain viable seed from crops grown there. (2019-10-14)

Novel material with strong action against fungi and tumors was developed
Researchers have created a composite with antifungal properties that are 32 times greater than those of silver by irradiating a metallic tungstate with electrons and femtosecond laser. (2019-10-02)

Organoid research revealed at Neuroscience 2019
Mini-brains, also called organoids, may offer breakthroughs in clinical research by allowing scientists to study human brain cells without a human subject. Hear leading scientists announce their new findings at Neuroscience 2019, the world's largest source of emerging news and cutting-edge research on the brain and nervous system. (2019-09-30)

Scientists triple storage time of human donor livers
A new method of preservation maintains human liver tissue for up to 27 hours will give doctors and patients a much longer timeframe for organ transplant. (2019-09-09)

Bioprinting complex living tissue in just a few seconds
Researchers from EPFL and the University Medical Center Utrecht in the Netherlands have developed an extremely fast optical method for sculpting complex shapes in stem-cell-laden hydrogels and then vascularizing the resulting tissue. Their groundbreaking technique stands to change the field of tissue engineering. (2019-08-23)

3D printed rocket fuel comparison at James Cook University
James Cook University scientists in Australia are using 3D printing to create fuels for rockets, and using tailor-made rocket motors they've built to test the fuels. (2019-07-30)

New method enables more extensive preclinical testing of heart drugs and therapies
A new biomimetic culture system mimics the environment of a living organ through continuous electrical stimulation and oxygenation, maintaining viability and functionality of heart slices for six days. Previous culture systems maintained functional heart slices for no more than 24 hours. The extended viability time will enable improved preclinical testing of drugs and gene therapies for effectiveness and toxicity. (2019-07-25)

The physiology of survival
Bacteria do not simply perish in hunger phases fortuitously; rather, the surrounding cells have a say as well. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered that two factors, above all, decide over life and death: the energy required to continue living and the efficiency with which surviving cells can recycle biomass from dead cells. (2019-07-17)

Flies may also spread disease among monkeys and apes
People the world over have a good sense that we do not want flies landing on our food. Research has justified that disgust, showing that flies associated with humans and their livestock spread a diversity of pathogens. Researchers of the Robert Koch Institute and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have now shown that such fly associations also exist in highly mobile non-human primate groups as they move kilometers every day through the rainforest. (2019-07-16)

Transformed tobacco fields could cuts costs for medical proteins
A new Cornell University-led study describes the first successful rearing of engineered tobacco plants in order to produce medical and industrial proteins outdoors in the field, a necessity for economic viability, so they can be grown at large scales. (2019-07-08)

Transformer cells: Shaping cellular 'behaviour'
Scientists from the Sechenov University, conjointly with their fellow Chinese and American researchers, have examined the latest advances in the use of skeletal muscle progenitor cells, specifying the core challenges inherent to the applicability of MPCs in cell therapy, and outlining the most promising breakthrough technologies. The outcomes of this research were reported in Applied Physics Reviews, the article having been roundly praised by the editorial board. (2019-07-01)

Long duration of sperm freezing makes no difference to live birth rates in large sperm bank study
Despite a time limit imposed in many countries on the freeze-storage of sperm, a new study from China has found that the long-term cryopreservation of semen in a sperm bank does not affect future clinical outcomes. Results of the study are presented today in Vienna at the 35th Annual Meeting of ESHRE by Dr Chuan Huang of the Changsa-Hunan Sperm Bank in China. (2019-06-24)

Frozen sperm retains its viability in outer space conditions
Zillionaires like Amazon founder Jeff Bezos who see the 'colonization' of space as an answer to the Earth's ever threatened resources will be reassured to learn that human sperm retains its complete viability within the different gravitational conditions found in outer space. (2019-06-23)

Reconfigurable multi-organ-on-a-chip system reliably evaluates chemotherapy toxicity
Christopher McAleer and colleagues have created a new multiorgan-on-a-chip system that can accurately capture the toxic effects of chemotherapies that have been metabolized by the liver -- effects usually not seen in standard cell culture preclinical drug development. (2019-06-19)

E-cigarette use, flavorings may increase heart disease risk, Stanford-led study finds
The flavoring liquid for electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease when inhaled, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2019-05-27)

How viable is your liver after you die?
In a paper to be published in a forthcoming issue of TECHNOLOGY, a group of researchers from Harvard Medical School have done a study on the viability of donated livers and its correlation with donor demographics. The results of this study could reduce the number of livers that are discarded and facilitate development of novel therapeutics and bioengineering for clinical research applications. (2019-05-13)

Seed abortion and the role of RNA Pol IV in seed development
In this newly released article in The Plant Cell, researchers find that in Arabidopsis plants, the abortion of seeds with extra genomes is caused by the enzyme RNA Pol IV and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, a major gene-silencing pathway in plants. (2019-05-07)

Antimicrobial paints have a blind spot
In a new study, Northwestern University researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints. Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium. (2019-04-18)

Scientists restore some functions in a pig's brain hours after death
Circulation and cellular activity were restored in a pig's brain four hours after its death, a finding that challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation of some brain functions after death, Yale scientists report April 18 in the journal Nature. (2019-04-17)

Lab tests of blu e-vapor show no evidence of damage to human lung cells
New peer reviewed research commissioned by Imperial Brands was undertaken to investigate the potential adverse effects of blu e-vapor on human airway tissue, compared with conventional cigarette smoke. In the in-vitro study, the impact of e-vapor -- from both flavoured and unflavoured e-liquid - on human airway tissue was similar to fresh air. In contrast, exposure to conventional cigarette smoke resulted in a significant and rapid decrease in lung tissue viability under the test conditions. (2019-04-09)

New study demonstrates radio signal benefits from decades-old theory
Engineering researchers have demonstrated that a longstanding theoretical method called direct antenna modulation has real-world utility for boosting the quality of radio signals when transmitting at high data rates. The finding has applications in fields such as military communications. (2019-04-02)

Artificial womb technology breaks its 4 minute mile
A major advancement in pioneering technology based around the use of an artificial womb to save extremely premature babies is being hailed as a medical and biotechnological breakthrough. (2019-03-26)

Climate change negatively affects waterbirds in the American West
New research shows that recent climate change is having profound effects on wetlands across the American West - affecting birds that use these wetlands for breeding, migration and wintering. (2019-03-18)

World's oldest semen still viable
Ram semen stored at the University of Sydney for 50 years has been used to successfully impregnate 34 ewes, with fertility rates as high as recently stored semen. (2019-03-17)

BAT's novel vaping product shows minimal toxicity in laboratory tests
A series of in vitro toxicology tests provide evidence that British American Tobacco's novel vaping product produces greatly reduced mutagenicity, cytotoxicity and effects on wound healing as compared to cigarette smoke. (2019-03-12)

Cannabinoid compounds may inhibit growth of colon cancer cells
Medical marijuana has gained attention in recent years for its potential to relieve pain and short-term anxiety and depression. Now, Penn State College of Medicine researchers say some cannabinoid compounds may actually inhibit the growth of colon cancer cells in the lab. (2019-02-05)

Assessing the airborne survival of bacteria in aerosol droplets from coughs and sneezes
The airborne transmission of diseases including the common cold, influenza and tuberculosis is something that affects everyone with an average sneeze or cough sending around 100,000 contagious germs into the air at speeds of up to 100 miles per hour. (2019-01-22)

Historical genomes reveal recent changes in genetic health of eastern gorillas
The critically endangered Grauer's gorilla has recently lost genetic diversity and has experienced an increase in harmful mutations. These conclusions were reached by an international team of researchers who sequenced eleven genomes from eastern gorilla specimens collected up to 100 years ago, and compared these with genomes from present-day individuals. The results are now published in Current Biology. (2018-12-27)

Targeting kinetoplastid and apicomplexan thymidylate biosynthesis as antiprotozoal strategy
Kinetoplastid and apicomplexan parasites comprise a group of protozoans responsible for human diseases, with a serious impact on human health and the socioeconomic growth of developing countries. Researchers review the available literature in relation to drug discovery studies targeting thymidylate biosynthesis in kinetoplastid (genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania) and apicomplexan (Plasmodium spp and Toxoplasma gondii) protozoans. (2018-12-26)

Improved understanding of the pathology of dwarfism may lead to new treatment targets
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a severe inherited dwarfing condition In PSACH, a genetic mutation leads to abnormal retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cartilage-producing cells (chondrocytes), which interferes with function and cell viability. In a report in The American Journal of Pathology, investigators describe how this protein accumulation results in 'ER stress' and initiates a host of pathologic changes. These findings may open up new ways to treat PSACH and other ER-stress-related conditions. (2018-12-12)

Niosomes, efficient DNA delivery vehicles for gene therapy of the central nervous system
In a piece of research conducted in collaboration, the NanoBioCel group of the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Pharmacy, and the University of Elche have designed some niosomes, which are lipid vesicles for use in gene therapies designed to treat diseases of the central nervous system. One of the new aspects of these vesicles is that lycopene has been used as an element, which has enabled transfection into brain cells to be improved. (2018-12-04)

Lake Erie algal blooms 'seeded' internally by overwintering cells in lake-bottom sediments
Western Lake Erie's annual summer algal blooms are triggered, at least in part, by cyanobacteria cells that survive the winter in lake-bottom sediments, then emerge in the spring to 'seed' the next year's bloom, according to a research team led by University of Michigan scientists. (2018-11-21)

Hidden costs of disease to greater Yellowstone elk
For decades researchers have known that a bacterial disease in elk, bison and cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem causes periodic abortions in these animals and chronic illness in humans drinking infected cow's milk. The disease, called brucellosis, poses a financial concern for dairy producers and cattle ranchers, but its effects on the wild elk population have generally been considered minor. (2018-10-29)

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