Current Video Games News and Events

Current Video Games News and Events, Video Games News Articles.
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Saki monkeys get screen time for more control over their lives in captivity
Scientists have designed and built an on-demand video device for white-faced saki monkeys to activate as and when they like. It's up to the animals to decide whether they want to step inside the device - the equivalent of pressing play - to watch the video of the week, from sealife like fish and jellyfish to wiggly worms and other zoo animals to abstract art and lush forests. (2021-02-23)

Actively preparing or watching others prepare food can lead to eating more
Food preparation (both actively preparing food yourself as well as watching others) can lead to eating more, a new study in the journal Appetite reports. Researchers believe this could lead to weight gain or -- depending on an individual's diet -- could be a useful way to get people to eat more healthily. (2021-02-23)

Boys who play video games have lower depression risk
Boys who regularly play video games at age 11 are less likely to develop depressive symptoms three years later, finds a new study led by a UCL researcher. (2021-02-18)

Study: Including videos in college teaching may improve student learning
As higher education institutions worldwide transition to new methods of instruction, including the use of more pre-recorded videos, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many observers are concerned that student learning is suffering as a result. However, a new comprehensive review of research offers some positive news for college students. The authors found that, in many cases, replacing teaching methods with pre-recorded videos leads to small improvements in learning and that supplementing existing content with videos results in strong learning benefits. (2021-02-17)

Robotic dogs & laughter therapy: combating loneliness & isolation while social distancing
Robotic dogs, laughter therapy and mindfulness are some of the ways that might help people - particularly the elderly - cope with loneliness and social isolation while social distancing, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2021-02-17)

UrFU Mathematician's new methods for solving optimal control problem of objects
Yurii Averboukh, associate professor, Department of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Federal University, senior researcher, Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, published his article ''A stability property in mean field type differential games'' in the Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications (2021-02-12)

Pigs show potential for 'remarkable' level of behavioral, mental flexibility in new study
A study involving two different pig species demonstrated that the animals are capable of remarkable behavioral and mental flexibility. The pigs learned to play a simple video game, connecting the movement of the cursor on the computer screen to the joystick they manipulated using their snouts. The researchers say understanding the depth of an animal's intelligence can provide insight into its evolution, how it compares with humans and other species, and how cognition impacts its welfare. (2021-02-11)

Learning by observation reduces cognitive bias, research suggests
Research suggests that observing others' decision-making can teach people to make better decisions themselves. The research, co-authored by Professor Irene Scopelliti, Professor of Marketing and Behavioural Science, tested the effectiveness of a new debiasing training strategy and reports first evidence that watching others make decisions can improve our own decision making. (2021-02-11)

Learn what you live? Study finds watching others can reduce decision bias
New research finds first evidence that watching and learning from others can help reduce bias and improve decision-making. In business, the results could help improve hiring practices or increase cost savings. (2021-02-11)

Mobile game that uses implicit learning improved children's short-term food choices
A new study examined how Indian 10- and 11-year-olds' food choices were affected by playing a pediatric dietary mobile game that uses implicit learning--educating players without making them aware of the lessons through innovations in neurocognitive training and immersive technology. The study found that the game significantly improved children's food choices immediately after play. (2021-02-10)

Age shall not weary them when it comes to discus and javelin
Discus and javelin throwers as well as marathon runners and race walkers are likely to achieve their best performances at a later age than sprinters, hurdlers and middle-distance runners. Why? It comes down to muscle fibres and technique. (2021-02-10)

79% decrease in primary care visits, 56-fold increase in virtual care: COVID-19 pandemic
In the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was an almost 80% decrease in primary care office visits in Ontario and a 56-fold increase in virtual visits, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2021-02-08)

Deepfake detectors can be defeated, computer scientists show for the first time
Systems designed to detect deepfakes --videos that manipulate real-life footage via artificial intelligence--can be deceived, computer scientists showed for the first time at the WACV 2021 conference which took place online Jan. 5 to 9, 2021. Researchers showed detectors can be defeated by inserting inputs called adversarial examples into every video frame. The adversarial examples are slightly manipulated inputs which cause artificial intelligence systems such as machine learning models to make a mistake. (2021-02-08)

Exercise caution after working out in virtual reality
Virtual 'exergaming' has become a popular way to exercise - especially among younger people - since the release of virtual reality (VR) fitness games on consoles such as Nintendo and Playstation. But while VR is undoubtedly raising fitness games to a whole new level, researchers at the University of South Australia are cautioning players about the potential side effects of VR, particularly in the first hour after playing. (2021-02-04)

'Where did I park my car?' Brain stimulation improves mental time travel
A new Northwestern Medicine study improved memory of complex, realistic events similar to these by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the brain network responsible for memory. The authors then had participants watch videos of realistic activities to measure how memory works during everyday tasks. The findings prove it is possible to measure and manipulate realistic types of memory. (2021-02-04)

'Audeo' teaches artificial intelligence to play the piano
A University of Washington team created Audeo, a system that can generate music using only visual cues of someone playing the piano. (2021-02-04)

Nearly all telehealth appointments at clinics for lower-income Americans were audio-only
The use of telehealth has skyrocketed since the start of the pandemic as insurers and the federal government agreed to pay for more remote care. A new study finds that most telehealth appointments at clinics that serve lower-income Americans have been audio-only visits, which may pose challenges in the future if payers consider dropping reimbursement for such services. (2021-02-02)

Youth with autism see sharp decline in physical activity between ages 9-13
A recent study from Oregon State University has found that to best help kids with autism maintain healthy rates of physical activity, interventions should be targeted during the ages of 9 to 13, as that's when kids show the biggest drop in active time. (2021-02-01)

CCNY researchers demonstrate how to measure student attention during remote learning
The Covid-19 pandemic has made home offices, virtual meetings and remote learning the norm, and it is likely here to stay. But are people paying attention in online meetings? Are students paying attention in virtual classrooms? Researchers Jens Madsen and Lucas C. Parra from City College of New York, demonstrate how eye tracking can be used to measure the level of attention online using standard web cameras, without the need to transfer any data from peoples computers, thus preserving privacy. (2021-01-29)

Scientists improved eye tracking technology in VR systems
The tracking of eye movement is one of the key elements of virtual and amplified reality technologies (VR/AR). A team from MSU together with a professor from RUDN University developed a mathematical model that helps accurately predict the next gaze fixation point and reduces the inaccuracy caused by blinking. The model would make VR/AR systems more realistic and sensitive to user actions. (2021-01-22)

A new archaeology for the Anthropocene era
Scantily clad tomb raiders and cloistered scholars piecing together old pots - these are the kinds of stereotypes of archaeology that dominate public perception. Yet archaeology in the new millennium is a world away from these images. In a major new report, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History probe a thoroughly modern and scientific discipline to understand how it is helping to address the considerable challenges of the Anthropocene. (2021-01-18)

Want a hot stock tip? Avoid this type of investment fund
'Buy low and sell high' says the old adage about investing in the stock market. But a relatively new type of investment fund is luring unsophisticated investors into buying when values are at their highest, resulting in losses almost immediately, a new study has found. The lure? Buying into trendy investment areas like cannabis, cybersecurity and work-from-home businesses. (2021-01-15)

Aggressive video games: Effects on mental health and behaviors in young people
Aggressive video games are not a risk factor for mental health problems, according to a new study of more than 3,000 youth (2021-01-13)

Studying chaos with one of the world's fastest cameras
Lihong Wang demonstrates how his ultrafast camera technology might aid in the study of unpredictable systems. (2021-01-13)

Use of telehealth jumped as pandemic shutdown began
As the pandemic shutdown occurred, emergency regulations were enacted to promote the use of telehealth. A new study finds that use of telehealth jumped sharply during the first months of the coronavirus pandemic shutdown, with the approach being used more often for behavioral health services than for medical care. (2021-01-11)

COVID forced psychiatric care online. Many patients want it to stay there, study finds
A new study suggests that more than half of outpatient psychiatry patients whose appointments were suddenly converted to video or phone interactions by the pandemic will want to keep going with virtual mental health care even after the pandemic subsides. The convenience of seeing a provider without leaving home, and avoiding potential exposure to the coronavirus, factor heavily into this preference. So does a patient's initial experience with seeing a provider virtually. (2021-01-08)

Significant disparities in telemedicine use, especially among older and POC patients
Older people as well as minorities, non-English speakers and those with lower incomes face inequities in accessing telemedicine care (2020-12-29)

Female athletes in WNBA don't return to elite performance for at least 2 years after ACL surgery
Study findings of ACL injuries in WNBA athletes sets return to sport expectations for all female athletes (2020-12-21)

Monkeys, like humans, persist at tasks they've already invested in
Humans are generally reluctant to give up on something they've already committed time and effort to. It's called the ''sunk costs'' phenomenon, where the more resources we sink into an endeavor, the likelier we are to continue--even if we sense it's futile. A new study shows that both capuchin monkeys and rhesus macaques are susceptible to the same behavior and that it occurs more often when the monkeys are uncertain about the outcome. (2020-12-18)

In fiction, we remember the deaths that make us sad
People may cheer the demise of evil villains in fiction, but the deaths we most remember are the meaningful and sad endings of the characters we loved, research suggests. In a new study, researchers found that when people were asked to recall the death of a fictional character, they were more likely to mention deaths perceived as ''meaningful'' than those seen as ''pleasurable.'' (2020-12-17)

Popular European football games linked to traffic accidents in Asia
Days when high profile European football matches are played are associated with more traffic accidents in Asia than days when less popular matches are played, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

The video referee in the spotlight
Since the 2019/20 season, controversial referee calls in the English Premier League may be technically reviewed and, if deemed necessary, corrected. Using a Twitter analysis of 129 games in the English Premier League, a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now determined how decisions made by video referees affect the mood of the fans. (2020-12-14)

Create a realistic VR experience using a normal 360-degree camera
Scientists at the University of Bath have developed a quick and easy approach for capturing 360° VR photography without using expensive specialist cameras. The system uses a commercially available 360° camera on a rotating selfie stick to capture video footage and create an immersive VR experience. (2020-12-14)

Reactive Video playback that you control with your body
An international team of researchers from Lancaster University, Stanford University and FXPAL, have created a system that dynamically adapts to mirror the position of the viewer's body and matches the speed of video playback to the viewer's movements. (2020-12-10)

Virtual doctor visits are increasing, but use differs by patient race, age and insurance
A new study published December 4, 2020, in the journal JMIR Medical Informatics examines the increase in telemedicine visits due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and recommends adopting policies that encourage virtual visits going forward. (2020-12-04)

Study: Telemedicine use disparity during COVID-19 among head and neck cancer patients
Retrospective research by Henry Ford otolaryngologists found telemedicine use disparity among head and neck cancer patients. (2020-12-02)

RUDN University mathematician suggested new approach to cooperative game
A mathematician from RUDN University developed a matrix representation of set functions. This approach is vivid and easy to check, and it makes the calculations easier. Among other things, the new development can be applied to cooperative game theory. (2020-12-01)

Neuroscientists measure fans' reactions to the big game
In a study published November 25 in the journal Neuron, researchers show how the feelings of surprise experienced while watching sports creates shifts in brain patterns. These shifts are important for neuroscientists to understand because they contribute to the formation of memories that are particularly strong. (2020-11-25)

Basketball on the brain: Neuroscientists use sports to study surprise
Princeton neuroscientists tracked the brains and pupils of self-described basketball fans as they watched March Madness games, to study how people process surprise -- an unexpected change of circumstances that shifts an anticipated outcome. They found that that shifts in the pattern of activity in high-level brain areas only happened at moments that contradicted the watchers' current beliefs about which team was more likely to win. (2020-11-25)

Parental restrictions on tech use have little lasting effect into adulthood
A new study of more than 1,200 individuals found that time spent with digital technology during adolescence has little impact on long-term use, suggesting that worries about widespread tech addiction may be overblown. Parental limits on youth tech use had no lasting impact on use in adulthood. (2020-11-18)

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