Current Video Games News and Events | Page 2

Current Video Games News and Events, Video Games News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Playfulness can be trained - here's why you should do it
Simple exercises can help to make people more playful and consequently feel more satisfied with their lives. This has been revealed in a new study by psychologists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) in the journal ''Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being''. The researchers had participants in an experiment perform a week of exercises to boost their playfulness. They found that the trait can be stimulated and trained - and that this improves a person's mood. (2020-08-27)

Video is not always effective in science communication
What we can learn for online public relations: - Keep the information concise so that one can go thorough it within about 1 minute. - A diagram (a schematic image) may help to understand complex issue. - People should be able to go through the information in their own pace. (2020-08-25)

NBA playoff format is optimizing competitive balance by eliminating travel
In addition to helping protect players from COVID-19, the NBA 'bubble' in Orlando may be a competitive equalizer by eliminating team travel. Researchers analyzing the results of nearly 500 NBA playoff games over six seasons found that a team's direction of travel and the number of time zones crossed were associated with its predicted win probability and actual game performance. (2020-08-25)

Skat and poker: More luck than skill?
Chess requires playing ability and strategic thinking; in roulette, chance determines victory or defeat, gain or loss. But what about skat and poker? Are they games of chance or games of skill in game theory? This classification also determines whether play may involve money. Prof. Dr Jörg Oechssler and his team of economists at Heidelberg University studied this question, developing a rating system similar to the Elo system used for chess. (2020-08-21)

Researchers discovered new information on the regulation of cancer cell motility
PIM kinases are enzymes that promote metastatic growth and spread of cancer cells. Researchers from the University of Turku, Finland, have obtained new information on how the PIM kinases enhance cancer cell motility by regulating the formation of actin fibres in the cytoskeleton. The published results support the development of PIM-targeted therapies to prevent metastasis formation in cancer patients. (2020-08-19)

Understanding why some children enjoy TV more than others
New research shows that children's own temperament could be driving the amount of TV they watch. The research shows how the brain responses of 10-month-old babies watching a clip from Disney's Fantasia on repeat could predict whether they would enjoy watching fast-paced TV shows six months later. The findings are important for the ongoing debate around early TV exposure. (2020-08-05)

Discovery could lead to more potent garlic, boosting flavor and bad breath
Their work could boost the malodorous - yet delicious - characteristics that garlic-lovers the world over savor. (2020-08-05)

How animation speed affects consumers' perception of product size
Consumers estimate the size of a product to be smaller when the product is animated to move faster in video ads. (2020-08-04)

Pandemic drives telehealth boom, but older adults can't connect
The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a significant increase in video visits between patients and their doctors, but for many older adults, the shift has cut them off from care, rather than connecting them. (2020-08-03)

Using games to study law of motions in mind
At Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, researchers have successfully established relationships between games and law of motions in mind through analogy of physics and game refinement theory. (2020-07-31)

Video camera in a public place knows the density of people or vehicle more accurately
Deep learning applied for image/video processing opened the door for the practical deployment for object detection and identification with acceptable accuracy. Crowd counting is another application of image/video processing. The scientists at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) designed a new DNN with backward connection, which achieved more accurate estimation of the density of objects. It can be applied for estimating human density in the public or vehicle density on a road. (2020-07-27)

'SoundWear' a heads-up sound augmentation gadget helps expand children's play experience
KAIST researchers designed a wearable bracelet using sound augmentation to leverage play benefits by employing digital technology. The research team also investigated how sound influences children's play experiences according to their physical, social, and imaginative aspects. (2020-07-27)

Vacancy dynamics on CO-covered Pt(111) electrodes
USTC reported in situ video-STM observations of additional point defects in the presence of this dynamic CO adlayer. The STM observations presented in this work provide direct insights into their dynamic behavior and formation mechanisms. (2020-07-25)

Sci-fi foretold social media, Uber and Augmented Reality, offers insights into the future
Science fiction authors foresaw augmented reality video games, the rise of social media and trends of hyper-consumption, and can help predict future consumer patterns. (2020-07-24)

Dartmouth-industry collaborations improve computer graphics
New software techniques make lighting in computer-generated images look more realistic for use in video games, extended reality, and scientific visualization tools. (2020-07-24)

Home-made face masks likely need at least 2 layers to curb COVID-19 spread
Home-made cloth face masks likely need a minimum of two layers, and preferably three, to prevent the dispersal of viral droplets from the nose and mouth that are associated with the spread of COVID-19, indicates a video case study published online in the journal Thorax. (2020-07-23)

Polycatenanes in mesoscale
An international research group led by Chiba University has succeeded in forming self-assembled molecule rings called ''polycatenanes'' without using additional molecular templates. The research group also succeeded in observing the polycatenanes, the longest structure reaching 500 nm, by using atomic force microscopy. This work, published in the journal Nature, is the first vital step in technological innovation for creating nanometer-sized topological structures and could potentially be applied to organic electronics and photonics, and other molecular machines. (2020-07-15)

Links between video games and gambling run deeper than previously thought, study reveals
A new study suggests that a number of practices in video games, such as token wagering, real-money gaming, and social casino spending, are significantly linked to problem gambling. (2020-07-14)

New study warns of misinformation about opt-out organ donation
A new study has warned of the power of a type of behaviour dubbed the 'lone wolf' effect which could result in people 'opting out' of supporting organ donation. (2020-07-10)

New research reveals privacy risks of home security cameras
An international study has used data from a major home Internet Protocol (IP) security camera provider to evaluate potential privacy risks for users. (2020-07-06)

Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions
Athletes who play contact sports are being particularly hard-hit by the prolonged restrictions imposed on games and training, according to a new study. (2020-07-06)

Future teachers more likely to view black children as angry, even when they are not
A new study of prospective teachers finds that they are more likely to interpret the facial expressions of Black boys and girls as being angry, even when the children are not angry. This is significantly different than how the prospective teachers interpreted the facial expressions of white children. (2020-07-06)

Leap in lidar could improve safety, security of new technology
Researchers have developed a new silicon chip with major applications in lidar systems for self-driving cars and smart phones. (2020-07-06)

New system combines smartphone videos to create 4D visualizations
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated that they can combine iPhone videos shot 'in the wild' by separate cameras to create 4D visualizations that allow viewers to watch action from various angles, or even erase people or objects that temporarily block sight lines. (2020-07-01)

Microscope allows gentle, continuous imaging of light-sensitive corals
Many corals are sensitive to bright light, so capturing their dynamics with traditional microscopes is a challenge. To work around their photosensitivity, Laissue developed a custom light-sheet microscope (the L-SPI) that allows gentle, non-invasive observation of corals and their polyps in detail over eight continuous hours, at high resolution. He and his colleagues, including MBL coral biologist Loretta Roberson, have published their findings in Scientific Reports. (2020-06-30)

Polarized tweets reveal deep divisions in congressional COVID-19 messaging
An analysis of COVID-19-related tweets issued by members of Congress from January 17 through March 31, 2020 finds that Democrats and Republicans quickly polarized along party lines in their messaging about the virus on Twitter. The findings underscore the lack of political consensus as the crisis ballooned (2020-06-24)

Getting real with immersive sword fights
Sword fights are often the weak link in virtual reality (VR) fighting games, with digital avatars engaging in battle using imprecise, pre-recorded movements that barely reflect the player's actions or intentions. Now a team at the University of Bath, in collaboration with the game development studio Ninja Theory, has found a solution to the challenges of creating realistic VR sword fights: Touche - a data-driven computer model based on machine learning. (2020-06-23)

Researcher develops tool to protect children's online privacy
A University of Texas at Dallas study of 100 mobile apps for kids found that 72 violated a federal law aimed at protecting children's online privacy. Dr. Kanad Basu, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science and lead author of the study, along with colleagues elsewhere, developed a tool that can determine whether an Android game or other mobile app complies with the federal Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). (2020-06-23)

Google's new light field video research showcases high-quality experience
Google is taking immersive media technology to the next level, showing a practical system for light field video. The research team, led by Michael Broxton, Google research scientist, and Paul Debevec, Google senior staff engineer, plans to demonstrate the new system at SIGGRAPH 2020. (2020-06-18)

US cities with pro sports see more flu deaths
Sports leagues may want to consider calling a timeout on reopening their doors to fans, based on new West Virginia University-led research that links an uptick in seasonal flu deaths to US cities with pro sports teams. (2020-06-18)

Virtual demolition
Scientists at Osaka University show how buildings and moving objects can be virtually removed from real-time images in a process of ''diminished reality.'' This work can be beneficial for urban and campus planners. (2020-06-17)

Digitize your dog into a computer game
Researchers from CAMERA at the University of Bath have developed motion capture technology that enables you to digitise your dog without a motion capture suit and using only one camera. (2020-06-16)

News reports of education 'achievement gaps' may perpetuate stereotypes of Black Americans
A new study finds that TV news reporting about racial achievement gaps led viewers to report exaggerated stereotypes of Black Americans as lacking education and may have increased implicit stereotyping of Black students as less competent than White students. (2020-06-11)

A robot to track and film flying insects
French scientists have developed the first cable-driven robot that can follow and interact with free-flying insects. With the help of this ''lab-on-cables,'' which is equipped with cameras and a controller that minimizes tracking errors between the insect's and the robot's position, they successfully studied the free flight of moths up to a speed of 3 metres/second. (2020-06-10)

Educational video may assist with decision to pursue hospice at the end of life for cancer patients
An educational video about hospice care can provide valuable information for patients with advanced cancer and their caregivers, improve perceptions of this quality form of care at the end of life, and increase its use. These are the findings of a study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-06-08)

How much color do we really see?
Color awareness has long been a puzzle for researchers in neuroscience and psychology, who debate over how much color observers really perceive. A study from Dartmouth in collaboration with Amherst College finds that people are aware of surprisingly limited color in their peripheral vision; much of our sense of a colorful visual world is likely constructed by our brain. The findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-06-08)

Youth-inspired program increases bike helmet use by urban children
To reduce the number of traumatic brain injuries in children, a team of health care professionals at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is urging emergency room physicians to help ensure that youngsters are thoroughly educated on the proper use of bike helmets, especially in urban environments where most severe head injuries occur. (2020-06-05)

The most viewed videos in Spain about COVID-19 on YouTube
Researchers at UPV have analyzed about 40,000 videos about COVID-19 posted on YouTube up to April 30th. Resistiré 2020 and Canciones del Coronavirus, by El Rubius: the most viewed and liked videos in Spain about COVID-19 on YouTube. (2020-06-04)

Video messages may help spread the word about antibiotic risks
Antibiotics are important drugs that can save lives, but using them too often can lead to dangerous strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. New Penn State research explores how to communicate risk while encouraging people to seek information on their own. (2020-06-03)

Playing video games linked with unhealthy behaviors for college men
Results from a new study suggest that college men who play video games tend to exercise less and have poorer eating habits compared to non-gamers. (2020-06-01)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.