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Current Video Games News and Events, Video Games News Articles.
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Dartmouth-industry collaborations improve computer graphics
New software techniques make lighting in computer-generated images look more realistic for use in video games, extended reality, and scientific visualization tools. (2020-07-24)
Home-made face masks likely need at least 2 layers to curb COVID-19 spread
Home-made cloth face masks likely need a minimum of two layers, and preferably three, to prevent the dispersal of viral droplets from the nose and mouth that are associated with the spread of COVID-19, indicates a video case study published online in the journal Thorax. (2020-07-23)
Polycatenanes in mesoscale
An international research group led by Chiba University has succeeded in forming self-assembled molecule rings called ''polycatenanes'' without using additional molecular templates. (2020-07-15)
Links between video games and gambling run deeper than previously thought, study reveals
A new study suggests that a number of practices in video games, such as token wagering, real-money gaming, and social casino spending, are significantly linked to problem gambling. (2020-07-14)
New study warns of misinformation about opt-out organ donation
A new study has warned of the power of a type of behaviour dubbed the 'lone wolf' effect which could result in people 'opting out' of supporting organ donation. (2020-07-10)
New research reveals privacy risks of home security cameras
An international study has used data from a major home Internet Protocol (IP) security camera provider to evaluate potential privacy risks for users. (2020-07-06)
Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions
Athletes who play contact sports are being particularly hard-hit by the prolonged restrictions imposed on games and training, according to a new study. (2020-07-06)
Future teachers more likely to view black children as angry, even when they are not
A new study of prospective teachers finds that they are more likely to interpret the facial expressions of Black boys and girls as being angry, even when the children are not angry. (2020-07-06)
Leap in lidar could improve safety, security of new technology
Researchers have developed a new silicon chip with major applications in lidar systems for self-driving cars and smart phones. (2020-07-06)
New system combines smartphone videos to create 4D visualizations
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have demonstrated that they can combine iPhone videos shot 'in the wild' by separate cameras to create 4D visualizations that allow viewers to watch action from various angles, or even erase people or objects that temporarily block sight lines. (2020-07-01)
Microscope allows gentle, continuous imaging of light-sensitive corals
Many corals are sensitive to bright light, so capturing their dynamics with traditional microscopes is a challenge. (2020-06-30)
Polarized tweets reveal deep divisions in congressional COVID-19 messaging
An analysis of COVID-19-related tweets issued by members of Congress from January 17 through March 31, 2020 finds that Democrats and Republicans quickly polarized along party lines in their messaging about the virus on Twitter. (2020-06-24)
Getting real with immersive sword fights
Sword fights are often the weak link in virtual reality (VR) fighting games, with digital avatars engaging in battle using imprecise, pre-recorded movements that barely reflect the player's actions or intentions. (2020-06-23)
Researcher develops tool to protect children's online privacy
A University of Texas at Dallas study of 100 mobile apps for kids found that 72 violated a federal law aimed at protecting children's online privacy. (2020-06-23)
Google's new light field video research showcases high-quality experience
Google is taking immersive media technology to the next level, showing a practical system for light field video. (2020-06-18)
US cities with pro sports see more flu deaths
Sports leagues may want to consider calling a timeout on reopening their doors to fans, based on new West Virginia University-led research that links an uptick in seasonal flu deaths to US cities with pro sports teams. (2020-06-18)
Virtual demolition
Scientists at Osaka University show how buildings and moving objects can be virtually removed from real-time images in a process of ''diminished reality.'' This work can be beneficial for urban and campus planners. (2020-06-17)
Digitize your dog into a computer game
Researchers from CAMERA at the University of Bath have developed motion capture technology that enables you to digitise your dog without a motion capture suit and using only one camera. (2020-06-16)
News reports of education 'achievement gaps' may perpetuate stereotypes of Black Americans
A new study finds that TV news reporting about racial achievement gaps led viewers to report exaggerated stereotypes of Black Americans as lacking education and may have increased implicit stereotyping of Black students as less competent than White students. (2020-06-11)
A robot to track and film flying insects
French scientists have developed the first cable-driven robot that can follow and interact with free-flying insects. (2020-06-10)
Educational video may assist with decision to pursue hospice at the end of life for cancer patients
An educational video about hospice care can provide valuable information for patients with advanced cancer and their caregivers, improve perceptions of this quality form of care at the end of life, and increase its use. (2020-06-08)
How much color do we really see?
Color awareness has long been a puzzle for researchers in neuroscience and psychology, who debate over how much color observers really perceive. (2020-06-08)
Youth-inspired program increases bike helmet use by urban children
To reduce the number of traumatic brain injuries in children, a team of health care professionals at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is urging emergency room physicians to help ensure that youngsters are thoroughly educated on the proper use of bike helmets, especially in urban environments where most severe head injuries occur. (2020-06-05)
The most viewed videos in Spain about COVID-19 on YouTube
Researchers at UPV have analyzed about 40,000 videos about COVID-19 posted on YouTube up to April 30th. (2020-06-04)
Video messages may help spread the word about antibiotic risks
Antibiotics are important drugs that can save lives, but using them too often can lead to dangerous strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (2020-06-03)
Playing video games linked with unhealthy behaviors for college men
Results from a new study suggest that college men who play video games tend to exercise less and have poorer eating habits compared to non-gamers. (2020-06-01)
Featured research from NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE
Press materials are now available for NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE, a dynamic virtual event showcasing new research findings and timely discussions on food and nutrition. (2020-05-28)
Children's temperament traits affect their motor skills
A recent study among 3- to 7-year-old children showed that children's motor skills benefitted if a child was older and participated in organised sports. (2020-05-27)
Watch: Babies know when you imitate them -- and like it
Six-month old infants recognize when adults imitate them, and perceive imitators as more friendly, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden. (2020-05-26)
AI management can benefit the growing online workforce
USC research shows that gig workers and others in the new crowdwork economy need more autonomy and clear purpose in online tasks to perform at a high level -- advantages that AI assistance offers. (2020-05-26)
Most parents concerned about privacy, body image impact of tweens using health apps
Most parents say they have concerns about how health apps may impact children ages 8-12, according to the C.S. (2020-05-18)
High five! It's possible to create proximity online
Despite physical distance, it's possible to create proximity between family members located in different places. (2020-05-18)
Is video game addiction real?
A recent six-year study, the longest study ever done on video game addiction, found that about 90% of gamers do not play in a way that is harmful or causes negative long-term consequences. (2020-05-13)
The COVID-19 pandemic reveals the potential of telehealth to improve care
Two new articles provide insights on the use of telehealth or virtual care in the age of COVID-19 and beyond, pointing to its value to not only prevent contagious diseases but also to provide access to effective and equitable care. (2020-05-12)
UMBC gaming researchers develop a new way to render characters with realistic skin
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a new solution to render an essential detail in many video games: human skin. (2020-05-11)
UCLA and Carnegie Mellon researchers develop real-time physics engine for soft robotics
Collaborators from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Carnegie Mellon University have adapted sophisticated computer graphics technology, used to create hair and fabric in animated films, to simulate the movements of soft, limbed robots for the first time. (2020-05-11)
Do I look mad? Reading facial cues with the touch-screen generation
Are today's children, who grew up with mobile technology from birth, worse at reading emotions and picking up cues from people's faces than children who didn't grow up with tablets and smartphones? (2020-05-07)
Research examines the impact of new technology used in video court hearings
A new academic evaluation of video-enabled justice published today (Monday 4 May) offers insights for courts, court users and others at a time when the Covid-19 pandemic looks set to necessitate a rapid increase in the use of technology to ensure the timely administration of justice. (2020-05-04)
'Breathable' electronics pave the way for more functional wearable tech
Engineering researchers have created ultrathin, stretchable electronic material that is gas permeable, allowing the material to 'breathe.' The material was designed specifically for use in biomedical or wearable technologies, since the gas permeability allows sweat and volatile organic compounds to evaporate away from the skin, making it more comfortable for users -- especially for long-term wear. (2020-04-30)
ETRI develops world's top-class 400-Gbps optical engine
The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea has succeeded to develop a world's top-class 400-Gbps transmitting/receiving optical engine. (2020-04-29)
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