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Current Viral Load News and Events, Viral Load News Articles.
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Ultra-absorptive nanofiber swabs could improve SARS-CoV-2 test sensitivity
Rapid, sensitive diagnosis of COVID-19 is essential for early treatment, contact tracing and reducing viral spread. However, some people infected with SARS-CoV-2 receive false-negative test results, which might put their and others' health at risk. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed ultra-absorptive nanofiber swabs that could reduce the number of false-negative tests by improving sample collection and test sensitivity. (2021-01-27)

Vaccine delivered via skin could help in fight against respiratory diseases
Brigham's Thomas Kupper, MD, and co-authors present results from preclinical studies suggesting skin scarification may help generate lung T cells and provide protection against infectious diseases, with implications for prevention of COVID-19. (2021-01-27)

Iron-carrying extracellular vesicles are key to respiratory viral-bacterial co-infection
The vesicles associate with bacterial cells and supply them with essential nutrients, promoting the growth of expansive bacterial communities. (2021-01-26)

HIV treatment in Ethiopia is a 'socioeconomic challenge'
For those who are diagnosed and have begun treatment for HIV, it is standard practice to regularly monitor viral load in the blood to assess response to treatment. A study of people living with HIV in Ethiopia shows that poverty and labour mobility are linked to high viral load despite treatment, indicating treatment failure. The researchers behind the study recommend that socioeconomic conditions should be taken into account to a greater extent in low-income countries. (2021-01-25)

In preclinical models, antiviral better inhibits COVID-19 than Remdesivir; further studies warranted
Working in preclinical models, researchers report that plitidepsin, a drug with limited clinical approval for the treatment of multiple myeloma, is more potent against SARS-CoV-2 than remdesivir, an antiviral that received FDA emergency use authorization for the treatment of COVID-19 in 2020. (2021-01-25)

Mapping mutations that escape antibodies against COVID-19 suggests prior mapping incomplete
A new approach to mapping viral mutations that 'escape' leading clinical antibodies has revealed mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 virus that allow it to evade treatments, including a single amino-acid mutation that fully escapes Regeneron's antibody cocktail. (2021-01-25)

Researchers engineer antibody that acts against multiple SARS-like viruses
Researchers have engineered an antibody that neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 with a potency that 'rivals' current lead SARS-CoV-2 clinical neutralizing antibodies, and that also broadly neutralizes a range of clade 1 sarbecoviruses. (2021-01-25)

Fighting respiratory virus outbreaks through 'nano-popcorn' sensor-based rapid detection
Respiratory diseases like influenza can spread rapidly and escalate to global health crises. Thus, to control them, simple yet sensitive detection techniques are needed. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a potential candidate but currently lacks reproducibility. To overcome this, researchers in Korea have now developed a novel SERS-based sensor that can effectively detect influenza A viral pathogens with high reproducibility. Through this improved method of detection, preventing future outbreaks of respiratory diseases can become easier. (2021-01-21)

Effect of bamlanivimab as monotherapy or in combination with etesevimab on viral load in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19
This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of three doses of bamlanivimab monotherapy (700 vs 2,800 vs 7,000 mg) vs combination bamlanivimab and etesevimab vs placebo on change in day 11 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 viral load in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19. (2021-01-21)

Scientists make pivotal discovery on mechanism of Epstein-Barr virus latent infection
Wistar Researchers have discovered a new enzymatic function of the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) protein EBNA1, a critical factor in EBV's ability to transform human cells and cause cancer. Study provides new indications for inhibiting EBNA1 function, opening up fresh avenues for development of therapies to treat EBV-associated cancers. (2021-01-21)

For some, GI tract may be vulnerable to COVID-19 infection
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that patients with Barrett's esophagus may be vulnerable to coronavirus infection from what they swallow. (2021-01-20)

OHIO researchers ID potential target for anti-viral drugs to battle COVID
This is a non-coding section of the RNA, which means that it is not translated into a protein, but it is likely key to the virus's replication. (2021-01-20)

COVID-19 model reveals key role for innate immunity in controlling viral load
Since SARS-CoV-2 was identified in December 2019, researchers have worked feverishly to study the novel coronavirus. Although much knowledge has been gained, scientists still have a lot to learn about how SARS-CoV-2 interacts with the human body, and how the immune system fights it. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science have developed a mathematical model of SARS-CoV-2 infection that reveals a key role for the innate immune system in controlling viral load. (2021-01-20)

The immune system mounts a lasting defense after recovery from COVID-19
The study participants continued to improve their antibodies months after initial infection, potentially due to exposure to remnants of the virus hidden in the gut. (2021-01-20)

A clinical trial provides encouraging results on ivermectin for reducing mild COVID-19
Results show a trend to lower viral loads and shorter duration of certain symptoms among treated patients, as compared to the placebo group (2021-01-19)

Why remdesivir does not fully stop the coronavirus
Their results explain why the drug has a rather weak effect (2021-01-18)

Physical virology shows the dynamics of virus reproduction
The reproductive cycle of viruses requires self-assembly, maturation of virus particles and, after infection, the release of genetic material into a host cell. New physics-based technologies allow scientists to study the dynamics of this cycle and may eventually lead to new treatments. (2021-01-14)

Population density and virus strains will affect how regions can resume normal life
As a new, apparently more transmissible version of the virus that causes COVID-19 has appeared in several countries, new research finds that the transmissibility of viral strains and the population density of a region will play big roles in how vaccination campaigns can help towns and cities return to more normal activities. The findings suggest that directing vaccines toward densely populated counties would help to interrupt transmission of the disease. (2021-01-14)

Algorithms designed to study language predict virus 'escape' mutations for SARS-CoV-2 and others
By bridging the conceptual divide between human language and viral evolution, researchers have developed a powerful new tool for predicting the mutations that allow viruses to 'escape' human immunity or vaccines. (2021-01-14)

Model analyzes how viruses escape the immune system
MIT researchers have devised a way to computationally model viral escape, using models that were originally developed to model language. The model can predict which sections of viral surface proteins, including those of influenza, HIV, and SARS-CoV-2, are more likely to mutate in a way that allows the virus to evade the human immune system. It can also identify sections that are less likely to mutate, making them good targets for new vaccines. (2021-01-14)

Formula predicts ideal dose of stem cells to cure HIV
Scientists have determined the optimal conditions following a stem cell transplant that could control HIV without the need of an everyday pill, according to a study published today in eLife. (2021-01-12)

Reviewing the evidence for cloth mask use among health care workers
A rapid, evidence-based review summarizes the effectiveness of cloth masks in protecting health care clinicians from respiratory viral infections, such as COVID-19. Nine studies were included in the review, and all but one were conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-01-12)

An augmented immune response explains the adverse course of COVID-19 in patients with hypertension
COVID-19 patients who also suffer from high blood pressure are more likely to fall severely ill with the disease, which also leaves them at greater risk of death. Scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, in collaboration with partners in Heidelberg and Leipzig, have now found that the immune cells of patients with hypertension are already pre-activated, and that this pre-activation is greatly enhanced under COVID-19. (2021-01-11)

NYUAD scientists uncover the genomic differences of marine and freshwater microalgae
NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Associate Professor of Biology Kourosh Salehi-Ashtiani and NYUAD Senior Research Scientist David Nelson report in a new study that they have successfully cultured and sequenced 107 microalgae species from 11 different phyla indigenous to varied locations and climates to gain insights on genomic differences in saltwater and freshwater microalgae. (2021-01-11)

Unravelling the mystery that makes viruses infectious
Researchers have for the first time identified the way viruses like the poliovirus and the common cold virus 'package up' their genetic code, allowing them to infect cells. The findings, published today (Friday, 8 January) in the journal PLOS Pathogens by a team from the Universities of Leeds and York, open up the possibility that drugs or anti-viral agents can be developed that would stop such infections. (2021-01-08)

New defense against dengue and emerging mosquito-borne viruses
New treatments to cut the global death rate from dengue, Zika and West Nile viruses could result from research led by The University of Queensland. Associate Professor Daniel Watterson from UQ's School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences said the team identified an antibody that improved survival rates in laboratory trials and reduced the presence of virus in the blood. (2021-01-07)

COVID-19 unmasked: math model suggests optimal treatment strategies
For older patients with COVID-19 infections, the clot-preventing drug heparin and immunity-enhancing drugs may improve outcomes. Patients with conditions such as obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure may benefit from anti-inflammatory drugs and drugs used to control blood pressure and vascular resistance. (2021-01-05)

New virtual screening strategy identifies existing drug that inhibits Covid-19 virus
A novel computational drug screening strategy combined with lab experiments suggest that pralatrexate, a chemotherapy medication originally developed to treat lymphoma, could potentially be repurposed to treat Covid-19. Haiping Zhang of the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology in Shenzhen, China, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology. (2020-12-31)

Pregnant women in third trimester unlikely to pass SARS-CoV-2 infection to newborns
Pregnant women who are infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, during the third trimester are unlikely to pass the infection to their newborns, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The study followed 127 pregnant women who were admitted to Boston hospitals during the spring of 2020. Among the 64 pregnant women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, no newborns tested positive for the virus. (2020-12-22)

Assessing maternal, neonatal SARS-CoV-2 viral load, transplacental antibody transfer, placental pathology
This report of maternal viral load, transplacental antibody transmission and placental pathology in 127 pregnancies during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic provides needed data about maternal viral control, reduced transplacental transfer of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and lack of vertical transmission in mother-newborn pairs. (2020-12-22)

Droughts, viruses and road networks: Trends that will impact our forests
A new UCPH study assembled an array of experts to highlight major trends that will impact the world's forests, and the people living around them, in the decade ahead. These trends include drought, viral outbreaks and vast infrastructure expansions across the globe. According to the researchers, a global strategy for human-nature interaction must be developed if we intend on ensuring the survival of both. (2020-12-22)

COVID-19 isolation hurting women more than men
A study by University of Calgary researchers with the Hotchkiss Brain Institute examining sex and gender differences on sleep, empathy and mood during months of isolation due to COVID-19 has found that women are suffering more than men with poorer sleep and more anxiety, depression and trauma, while also feeling more empathetic than men. (2020-12-22)

Fungal RNA viruses: Unexpected complexity affecting more than your breakfast omelet
Traditional approaches for studying fungal RNA viruses have relied upon sequence similarity, resulting in an underestimation of RNA viral genome diversity. Researchers from the University of Tsukuba used an advanced technological approach called Fragmented and Primer Ligated Double Stranded RNA sequencing, or FLDS, to identify viral sequences that were previously overlooked. They identified novel viruses and viral genome structures and show that FLDS is a powerful tool for understanding RNA viral genome diversity. (2020-12-21)

Corona: How the virus interacts with cells
Scientists from Würzburg and the US have charted the first global atlas of direct interactions between SARS-CoV-2 RNA and human host cells. This may provide a starting point for novel treatments. (2020-12-21)

Nobel Prize reflects perseverance in scientific research
New Rochelle, NY, December 21, 2020--The 2020 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine went to three researchers for their discovery of hepatitis C virus (HCV). The undying perseverance that it took to find and cure this elusive virus (2020-12-21)

SARS-CoV-2 induces inflammation, cytokine storm and stress in infected lung cells
The researchers Wasco Wruck and Prof. James Adjaye from the Institute of Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, Medical Faculty of Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, Germany, employed a bioinformatic approach on transcriptome data pertaining to human lung epithelial cells infected with SARS-CoV-2. The meta-analysis unveiled several adversely affected biological processes in the lung which no doubt also applies to other infected organs such as the heart and kidney. Their study is published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-18)

Reliable COVID-19 test could reduce virus spread
Results of a unique test developed by a world-renowned expert, which targets three viral genes to increase reliability and could cut COVID-19 detection time to 20 minutes, have been peer reviewed and published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-12-17)

Two new studies offer ways to avert accidents and workplace injuries for American workers
Human error is a causal factor in up to 80 percent of workplace accidents. A new study measuring the eye movements and cognitive processes for at-risk workers, sheds new light on the potential to avert accidents and possibly prevent workplace injuries. The study 'Measuring attention, working memory, and visual perception to reduce risk of injuries in the construction industry,' by Behzad Esmaeili, Ph.D., George Mason University challenges the conventional, reactionary paradigm of safety-risk management (2020-12-17)

Machine learning boosts the search for 'superhard' materials
Superhard materials are in high demand in industry, from energy production to aerospace, but finding suitable new materials has largely been a matter of trial and error based on classical materials such as diamonds. Now researchers have reported a machine learning model that can accurately predict the hardness of new materials, allowing scientists to more readily find compounds suitable for use in a variety of applications. (2020-12-17)

SUTD and MIT scientists first to simulate a large-scale virus, M13
Scientists from the Singapore University of Technology and Design and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a procedure that combines various resolution levels in a computer simulation of a biological virus. Their procedure maps a large-scale model that includes features, such as a virus structure, nanoparticles, etc, to its corresponding coarse-grained molecular model. This approach opens the prospects to a whole-length virus simulation at the molecular level. (2020-12-16)

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