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Current Virginia Tech News and Events, Virginia Tech News Articles.
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Menopausal palpitations causing distress
Many menopausal women report having palpitation distress. The likelihood of women reporting palpitation distress was higher with worse insomnia, depressive symptoms, perceived stress, and menopausal quality of life (QOL) issues. (2020-12-02)

Preschool children can't see the mountains for the cat
Imagine seeing an image of a cat in front of a wide scene of mountains and being told just to remember the mountains if you saw them in a later picture. As an adult, that's not hard to do. But a new study shows that, even when told to pay attention to the mountain, preschool children focus so much on the cat that they won't later recognize the same mountain. (2020-11-30)

Researchers show risk-averse teens sway peers to make safer choices
Prior studies have shown adolescents are likely to experiment along with friends who use drugs and alcohol. But do friends who avoid risks have similar influential power? In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Virginia Tech neuroscientists at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC show that observing peers making sound decisions may help teenagers avoid risky situations. (2020-11-30)

Gender differences in academic productivity during COVID-19 pandemic
During the COVID-19 pandemic, most science and medical faculty began working from home, with women reporting a significant decrease in manuscript submissions. Women also report providing 77.6% of the childcare themselves, compared to 61.3% for men, (2020-11-24)

Targeting calcium overload could improve stroke outcomes, research suggests
Excessive calcium contributes to harmful inflammation in ischemic stroke, and targeting it may provide doctors with a new way to improve patient outcomes. (2020-11-23)

Antibiotic resistance surveillance tools in Puerto Rican watersheds after Hurricane Maria
Virginia Tech researchers and international collaborators have further developed an innovative antibiotic resistance surveillance approach by applying DNA sequencing techniques to detect the spread of disease in watersheds impacted by large-scale storms. (2020-11-18)

Parental restrictions on tech use have little lasting effect into adulthood
A new study of more than 1,200 individuals found that time spent with digital technology during adolescence has little impact on long-term use, suggesting that worries about widespread tech addiction may be overblown. Parental limits on youth tech use had no lasting impact on use in adulthood. (2020-11-18)

'Meet people where they are:' local health departments key to hepatitis B vaccination
A study led by Stacy Tressler--who earned her doctorate in epidemiology from the West Virginia University School of Public Health--suggests that local health departments are vital to getting the hepatitis B vaccine to the people who need it most. (2020-11-17)

Virginia Tech lab proves the concept of a natural approach to antiperspirants
The Virginia Tech Nature-Inspired Fluids and Interfaces Lab, led by Associate Profesor Jonathan Boreyko, has just made a major breakthrough in the study of natural antiperspirants. (2020-11-16)

East African Rift System is slowly breaking away, with Madagascar splitting into pieces
''The rate of present-day break-up is millimeters per year, so it will be millions of years before new oceans start to form,'' said Stamps, an assistant professor in the Virginia Tech College of Science.  (2020-11-13)

Antidepressant may prevent severe COVID-19, trial suggests
The antidepressant fluvoxamine appears to prevent COVID-19 infections from worsening and may help keep patients out of the hospital, a trial based on research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests. (2020-11-13)

Promising MS drug may worsen disease, research suggests
The drug has not yet made it to human trials for multiple sclerosis, but scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine are urging their colleagues to move cautiously. (2020-11-13)

Cannabis to treat gynecological conditions
A significant number of women would consider using cannabis to treat gynecological conditions, primarily gynecological pain. (2020-11-12)

You drive like a girl: Study shows gender bias in perceptions of ride-sharing performance
While digital brokerages provide a more efficient method for the exchange of goods and services and an improved way for consumers to voice their opinions about the quality of work they receive, bias and discrimination can emerge as part of the review process, according to Notre Dame research. (2020-11-09)

Machine learning advances materials for separations, adsorption, and catalysis
An artificial intelligence technique -- machine learning -- is helping accelerate the development of highly tunable materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) that have important applications in chemical separations, adsorption, catalysis, and sensing. (2020-11-09)

Divide and conquer--modular controller design strategy makes upgrading power grids easier
Scientists at Tokyo Tech develop a novel approach for the modular design of controllers for large-scale network systems. Their strategy, which provides a completely decentralized method to design controllers for subsystems of a larger whole, could be readily applied in power grids, greatly simplifying the task of sequentially upgrading individual subdivisions while ensuring stability and performance. (2020-11-04)

New species of ancient cynodont, 220 million years old, discovered
''This discovery sheds light on the geography and environment during the early evolution of mammals,'' Kligman said. (2020-11-03)

Collective impact partnership models help close health care workforce gap
New research published in the VASCD Journal, A Case Study in Growing the Health Workforce Pipeline in Virginia, seeks to address these critical shortages in Virginia's health care workforce by evaluating collective impact partnership models in Career and Technical Education (CTE) for educators and health care providers. The research was led by Tammie Jones, research manager and PhD candidate from the Department of Health Administration and Policy at the George Mason University College of Health and Human Services. (2020-10-30)

How hard is it to vote in your state?
A new analysis identifies U.S. states that make it easiest, and those that make it more challenging, to register and vote. (2020-10-28)

Cancer's dangerous renovations to our chromosomes revealed
Cancer remodels the architecture of our chromosomes so the disease can take hold and spread, new research reveals. (2020-10-27)

MonoEye: A human motion capture system using a single wearable camera
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Carnegie Mellon University have together developed a new human motion capture system that consists of a single ultra-wide fisheye camera mounted on the user's chest. The simplicity of their system could be conducive to a wide range of applications in the sports, medical and entertainment fields. (2020-10-21)

3D hand pose estimation using a wrist-worn camera
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology working in collaboration with colleagues at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of St Andrews and the University of New South Wales have developed a wrist-worn device for 3D hand pose estimation. The system consists of a camera that captures images of the back of the hand, and is supported by a neural network called DorsalNet which can accurately recognize dynamic gestures. (2020-10-21)

Covid-19 interventions can cut virus infections, severe outcomes, and healthcare needs
Non-pharmaceutical interventions such as voluntary shelter-in-place, quarantines, and other steps taken to control the SARS-CoV-2 virus can reduce the peak number of infections, daily infection rates, cumulative infections, and overall deaths, a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE has found. (2020-10-21)

This red light means 'go' for medical discoveries
With a little tweak of the color palette, University of Virginia researchers have made it easier for scientists to unravel the mysteries of disease and develop new treatments. (2020-10-20)

COVID-19 heightens urgency of advanced care planning, according to WVU study
West Virginia University researchers saw a sharp uptick in inquiries regarding end-of-life care in the first half of 2020, according to a study published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. (2020-10-19)

Removal of dairy cows from the United States may reduce essential nutrient supply with little effect on greenhouse gas emissions
A suggested solution to increasing food production worldwide while reducing greenhouse gas emissions has been to eliminate or reduce animal production in favor of plant production. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from Virginia Tech and the US Dairy Forage Research Center studied the effects of dairy product removal on greenhouse gas emissions and nutrient availability in US diets under various removal scenarios. (2020-10-15)

Scientists show jet lag conditions impair immune response in mice
International researchers publishing in Science Advances reveal in a mouse study that chronic jet lag alters the microenvironment surrounding tumor cells, making it more favorable for tumor growth, and also hinders the body's natural immune defenses. (2020-10-14)

Smartphone data helps predict schizophrenia relapses
Passive data from smartphones -- including movement, ambient sound and sleep patterns -- can help predict episodes of schizophrenic relapse, according to new Cornell Tech research. (2020-10-13)

Scientists find neurochemicals have unexpectedly profound roles in the human brain
In first-of-their-kind observations in the human brain, an international team of researchers has revealed two well-known neurochemicals -- dopamine and serotonin -- are at work at sub-second speeds to shape how people perceive the world and take action based on their perception. (2020-10-12)

Proactive steps linked to reduced medical costs, hospital visits for children with asthma
A new study looking at data from tens of thousands of children with asthma finds that several widely available interventions are associated with both reduced medical costs and a reduced likelihood that the children will need to visit an emergency room or stay in the hospital. (2020-10-12)

Seagrass restoration speeds recovery of ecosystem services
The reintroduction of seagrass into Virginia's coastal bays is one of the great success stories in marine restoration. Now, a long-term monitoring study shows this success extends far beyond a single plant species, rippling out to engender substantial increases in fish and invertebrate abundance, water clarity, and the trapping of pollution-causing carbon and nitrogen. (2020-10-07)

Letter from leading researchers urges terminology update, shift in COVID-19 guidance
Scientists affiliated with leading research institutions across the United States state in a letter published Monday in the journal Science that researchers across disciplines must converge to deliver clear public health guidance about how SARS-CoV-2 is spread in the air. (2020-10-05)

UQ tech could offer 'faster, cheaper and mobile' COVID-19 diagnosis
Technology that helps to quickly extract and analyse genetic material could be used for cheap, accurate and mobile COVID-19 testing, including at airports and remote testing centres. (2020-10-05)

Tweaks to land-based conservation efforts would pay huge freshwater ecosystem dividends
Conservation projects aimed at protecting land-dwelling species could net major gains in helping species living in streams, lakes and wetlands with relatively minor adjustments. (2020-10-02)

Buying emergency contraception is legal but not always easy at small, mom-and-pop pharmacies
Amie Ashcraft has studied the availability and accessibility of emergency contraception in West Virginia pharmacies. She and her research team found that chain pharmacies--like CVS and Walmart--were more likely than independent ones to keep emergency contraception in stock. (2020-09-29)

Genetic differences in body fat shape men and women's health risks
New findings about body fat help explain the differing health risks men and women face - and set the stage for better, more targeted treatments. (2020-09-28)

An enhanced ruthenium-based catalyst for primary amine synthesis
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed a high-performance reusable ruthenium-based catalyst for the production of primary amines. Their method represents a major advance for the development of efficient catalysts that enable selective conversion of alcohols into primary amines under mild reaction conditions. (2020-09-25)

Bridging the gap between the magnetic and electronic properties of topological insulators
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology shed light on the relationship between the magnetic properties of topological insulators and their electronic band structure. Their experimental results shed new insights into recent debates regarding the evolution of the band structure with temperature in these materials, which exhibit unusual quantum phenomena and are envisioned to be crucial in next-generation electronics, spintronics, and quantum computers. (2020-09-24)

HIV drugs could prevent diabetes, study suggests
Patients taking drugs called NRTIs to treat HIV and hepatitis B had a 33% lower risk of developing diabetes. (2020-09-23)

Cities beat suburbs at inspiring cutting-edge innovations
The disruptive inventions that make people go ''Wow!'' tend to come from research in the heart of cities and not in the suburbs, a new study suggests. Researchers found that, within metro areas, the majority of patents come from innovations created in suburbs. But the unconventional, disruptive innovations - the ones that combine research from different technological fields - are more likely to be produced in cities, (2020-09-22)

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