Current Virology News and Events

Current Virology News and Events, Virology News Articles.
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Absence of natural killer cell receptor associated with severe Covid-19
The course and severity of COVID-19 in individual patients is largely influenced by the interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and the human immune system. The NKG2C receptor communicates with an infected cell via one of its specialised surface structures, HLA-E, which results in the destruction of virus-infected cells. However, due to a genetic variation, approximately 4% of the population naturally lack the this receptor NKG2C, and in 30% of the population this receptor is only partially available. (2021-02-22)

Duration of antibody response varies among adults naturally reinfected with RSV
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine found that while most individuals responded to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) natural reinfection with a typical sustained antibody response associated with protection, a few individuals surprisingly responded atypically, not being able to sustain the antibody response, which declined to levels that made the individuals susceptible to RSV reinfection. (2021-02-04)

Reston ebolavirus spreads efficiently in pigs
Reston ebolavirus (RESTV) should be considered a livestock pathogen with potential to affect other mammals, including people. The caution comes from a study in PNAS in which scientists found that experimental piglets infected with RESTV developed severe respiratory disease and shed the virus from the upper respiratory tract. RESTV can infect humans but isn't known to cause disease. Now the scientists express concern that pigs could serve as an ''interim or amplifying host for ebolaviruses.'' (2020-12-21)

Experimental vaccine for deadly tickborne virus effective in cynomolgus macaques
An experimental vaccine developed in Europe to prevent infection by Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) has protected cynomolgus macaques in a new collaborative study from National Institutes of Health scientists. The study, published in Nature Microbiology, comes about three years after the same research group developed the macaque model for CCHFV. No specific treatments or vaccines for CCHFV exist. (2020-11-30)

New drug candidate for the treatment of COVID-19
Researchers from the University of Kent, the Goethe-University in Frankfurt am Main (Germany), and the Hannover Medical School (Germany) have identified a drug with the potential to provide a treatment for COVID-19. (2020-10-30)

How herpes infection may impair human fetal brain development
Three cell-based models shed light on how herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, which can spread to the fetal brain during pregnancy, may contribute to various neurodevelopmental disabilities and long-term neurological problems into adulthood, according to a study published October 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Pu Chen and Ying Wu of Wuhan University, and colleagues. (2020-10-22)

COVID-19 rapid test has successful lab results, research moves to next stages
Rapid detection of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, in about 30 seconds following the test, has had successful preliminary results in Mano Misra's lab at the University of Nevada, Reno. The test uses a nanotube-based electrochemical biosensor, a similar technology that Misra has used in the past for detecting tuberculosis and colorectal cancer as well as detection of biomarkers for food safety (2020-10-14)

Decreased MIR2911 absorption in human with SIDT1 polymorphism fails to inhibit SARS-CoV-2
In a new study in Cell Discovery, Liang Li and Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University and two other groups report that SIDT1 polymorphism remarkably decreases HD-MIR2911 absorption in human. Exosome isolated from volunteers that carry SIDT1 polymorphism has lower level of HD-MIR2911 and fails to inhibit of SARS-CoV-2 replication. (2020-09-11)

Severe Covid-19 despite or even due to the strong immunity
A weak immune response isn't the cause of dangerous lung failure in severe Covid-19 infections. Such infections seem, on the contrary, to be caused by an overreaction of the immune system. This is the conclusion made by a research team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and the university hospital of Duisburg-Essen led by Professor Nina Babel, Head of the Centre for Translational Medicine at the RUB clinic Marien Hospital Herne. (2020-09-01)

Antiviral used to treat cat coronavirus also works against SARS-CoV-2
Researchers at the University of Alberta are preparing to launch clinical trials of a drug used to cure a deadly disease caused by a coronavirus in cats that they expect will also be effective as a treatment for humans against COVID-19. (2020-08-27)

Blocking cellular communication stops SARS-CoV-2
Many viruses use and manipulate the communication pathways of their host cells to boost their own replication. Now biochemists and virologists from Goethe University and University Hospital Frankfurt have drawn a complete picture of communication within human cells infected with SARS-CoV-2. In cell culture experiments, the researchers succeeded in stopping virus replication with a series of cancer drugs tested in clinical practice. The drugs target the places where several of the cell's communication pathways meet. (2020-08-25)

Absorbed plant MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction inhibits SARS-CoV-2 replication
In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication. Drinking of HD accelerate the negative conversion of COVID-19 patients. (2020-08-05)

Transferrin identified as potential contributor to COVID-19 severity
The University of Kent's School of Biosciences and the Institute of Medical Virology at Goethe-University, Frankfurt am Main, have identified that a glycoprotein known as transferrin may critically contribute to severe forms of COVID-19. (2020-08-03)

Rapid test for the determination of antibodies against Sars-Cov-2
To determine immunity to Sars-Cov-2 and the effectiveness of potential vaccines, the amount of neutralising antibodies in the blood of recovered or vaccinated individuals must be determined. A traditional neutralisation test usually takes two to three days and must be carried out with infectious coronaviruses in a laboratory complying to biosafety level 3. A Swiss-German research team has launched a test that takes only 18 hours and doesn't have high biosafety requirements. (2020-07-30)

A practicable and reliable therapeutic strategy to treat SARS-CoV-2 infection
In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang's group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication. Drinking of HD accelerate the negative conversion of COVID-19 patients. (2020-07-28)

Immunoprotein impairs Sars-Cov-2
A protein produced by the human immune system can strongly inhibit corona viruses, including Sars-Cov-2, the pathogen causing Covid-19. An international team from Germany, Switzerland and the USA successfully showed that the LY6E-Protein prevents coronaviruses from causing an infection. (2020-07-28)

Researchers identify evolutionary origins of SARS-CoV-2
By reconstructing the evolutionary history of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, an international research team of Chinese, European and U.S. scientists has discovered that the lineage that gave rise to the virus has been circulating in bats for decades and likely includes other viruses with the ability to infect humans. The findings have implications for the prevention of future pandemics stemming from this lineage. (2020-07-28)

Advanced Cryo-EM reveals viral RNA replication complex structure in stunning detail
For the first time, scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research have generated near atomic resolution images of a major viral protein complex responsible for replicating the RNA genome of a member of the positive-strand RNA viruses. (2020-07-20)

Invisible defence against adenoviruses
An adenovirus infection can be potentially life-threatening, especially for children after a stem cell transplant. Virologists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Research Center for Environmental Health Helmholtz Zentrum München have successfully shown that a previously approved medication used in cancer treatment could help inhibit this virus infection. Due to the special mechanism of action, the virus cannot develop defence strategies. (2020-07-13)

Treating leukaemia more effectively
Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most common kind of cancer in children. T-ALL, a subtype that resembles T-lymphocytes, can be treated successfully with the drug nelarabine. The drug has not been successful, however, with B-ALL, a subtype resembling B-lymphocytes. This has puzzled oncologists sinced the 1980's. Now, an international research team headed by Goethe University and the University of Kent has discovered the reason: B-ALL cells contain the enzyme SAMHD1, which deactivates the drug. (2020-06-24)

Slow-growing rotavirus mutant reveals early steps of viral assembly
A serendipitous observation led researchers at Baylor College of Medicine to uncover new insights into the formation of rotavirus viroplasms. (2020-06-23)

Respiratory virus builds 'doorbell' to trick its way into cells, researchers find
New research from UAlberta microbiologists has shed light on how the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)--one of the most common viral infections--breaks into our cells to cause infection. In a study published in the journal Nature, associate professor of medical microbiology and immunology David Marchant and an international team of researchers discovered that RSV tricks cells into letting it in by essentially ringing a doorbell that calls its receptor to the virus waiting at the door. (2020-06-03)

HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus collectively through the nuclear endocytosis-like pathway
How HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus through the undersized nuclear pore remains mysterious. By multi labelling of viral and cellular components and dynamically tracking, researchers observed that HIV-1 selectively gathered at the microtubule organization center, leading the nearby nuclear envelope to undergo deformation, invagination and restoration to form a nuclear vesicle in which the viral particles were wrapped; then, the inner membrane of the nuclear vesicle ruptured to release HIV-1 viral cores into the nucleus. (2020-06-01)

Coronavirus structure clue to high infection rate
Cornell University researchers studying the structure of the virus that causes COVID-19 have found a unique feature that could explain why it is so transmissible between people. (2020-05-05)

ASU scientific team finds new, unique mutation in coronavirus study
Now, using a pool of 382 nasal swab samples obtained from possible COVID-19 cases in Arizona, Lim's team has identified a SARS-CoV-2 mutation that had never been found before----where 81 of the letters have vanished, permanently deleted from the genome. ''One of the reasons why this mutation is of interest is because it mirrors a large deletion that arose in the 2003 SARS outbreak,'' said Lim, an assistant professor at ASU's Biodesign Institute. (2020-05-04)

Virologists show that sample pooling can massively increase coronavirus testing capacity
To contain the coronavirus pandemic, global testing capacity for the SARS-CoV-2 virus needs to be ramped up significantly. Scientists at the Institute of Virology at Saarland University Medical Centre have developed a pool testing procedure now published in the high-ranking, international scientific journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases. (2020-04-28)

Herpes virus decoded
The genome of the herpes simplex virus 1 was decoded using new methods. Hundreds of previously unknown gene products were found. The virus causes lip herpes, but can also be life-threatening. (2020-04-27)

COVID-19 and pregnancies: What we know
Amid the rapidly evolving global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that has already had profound effects on public health and medical infrastructure across the globe, many questions remain about its impact on child health. New research published in the Journal of Clinical Virology indicates that the vulnerability of neonates and children and their role in the spread of the virus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 [SARS-CoV-2]) should be included in preparedness and response plans. (2020-04-27)

How the immune system reacts to hepatitis C viruses
The interferon-stimulated gene C19orf66 plays an important role in the defence against hepatitis C viruses. A research team at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) headed by Professor Eike Steinmann from the Department for Molecular and Medical Virology has now studied how C19orf66 works. The results show that C19orf66 disrupts the formation of the viral replication machinery. (2020-04-24)

Individual genetic variation in immune system may affect severity of COVID-19
Genetic variability in the human immune system may affect susceptibility to, and severity of infection by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus responsible for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The research is published today, April 17 in the Journal of Virology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. (2020-04-17)

WHO-recommended disinfectants are effective against novel coronavirus
When used correctly, both alcohol-based hand disinfectants recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) are effective against the novel coronavirus Sars-Cov-2, as confirmed by an international research team headed by Professor Stephanie Pfänder from the Department of Molecular and Medical Virology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB). The journal Emerging Infectious Diseases published the relevant article in its online edition on April 13, 2020. (2020-04-16)

Mystery solved, rotavirus VP3 is a unique capping machine
After eluding researchers for more than 30 years, the VP3 protein of rotavirus has finally revealed its unique structure and function to a team led by scientists at Baylor College of Medicine. (2020-04-16)

How important is speech in transmitting coronavirus?
Normal speech by individuals who are asymptomatic but infected with coronavirus may produce enough aerosolized particles to transmit the infection, according to aerosol scientists at UC Davis. Although it's not yet known how important this is to the spread of COVID-19, it underscores the need for strict social distancing measures -- and for virologists, epidemiologists and engineers who study aerosols and droplets to work together on this and other respiratory diseases. (2020-04-03)

Coronavirus SARS-CoV2: BESSY II data accelerate drug development
A coronavirus is keeping the world in suspense. SARS-CoV-2 is highly infectious and can cause severe pneumonia (COVID-19). A team from the University of Luebeck has now found a promising approach. Using the high-intensity X-ray light from the Berlin synchrotron source BESSY II, they have decoded the 3D architecture of the main protease of SARS-CoV-2. This protein plays a central role in the reproduction of the virus. (2020-03-20)

Breastfeeding and risks of allergies and asthma
In an Acta Paediatrica study, exclusive breastfeeding for the first 3 months was linked with a lower risk of respiratory allergies and asthma when children reached 6 years of age. (2020-03-04)

Survival of the fittest: How primate immunodeficiency viruses are evolving
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that unlike immunodeficiency viruses (IVs) that infect other primates, the IV that infects the greater spot-nosed monkey is able to antagonize human BST-2 to survive and proliferate. These findings may help explain the evolution of other IVs. (2020-03-03)

Scientists find ally in fight against brain tumors: Ebola
Glioblastomas are relentless, hard-to-treat, and often lethal brain tumors. Yale scientists have enlisted a most unlikely ally in efforts to treat this form of cancer -- elements of the Ebola virus. (2020-02-12)

Rabies: New prophylactic and therapeutic avenues
Rabies is still responsible for approximately 60,000 human deaths per year mostly in Asia and Africa and affects especially underserved people. Prophylactic measures have significantly improved. They are now composed of the vaccine allied to purified human or equine rabies immunoglobulins. However, these immunoglobulins are expensive and not easy to reach in developing settings. Researchers have visualized one of the most potent and most broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody in interaction with the rabies glycoprotein. (2020-02-11)

How long coronaviruses persist on surfaces and how to inactivate them
How long do corona viruses persist on surfaces such as door handles or hospital bedside tables? Which methods can be used to kill them effectively? A research team from Greifswald and Bochum has compiled all published data that are known to researchers today and published them in the Journal of Hospital Infection on 6 February 2020. (2020-02-07)

New details on how a viral protein puts the brakes on virus replication
Researchers used computational chemistry, biochemistry and virology to uncover new information on how viruses such as West Nile, dengue and Zika replicate. (2020-02-07)

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