Current Visual Perception News and Events

Current Visual Perception News and Events, Visual Perception News Articles.
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Novice drivers talking on hand-held smartphones are more likely to run red-lights
Young novice drivers who speak into hand-held smartphones while driving are also likely to drive while under the influence of drink or drugs, according to researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software. (2021-02-23)

Gay men who 'sound gay' encounter more stigma and discrimination from heterosexual peers
Gay men are more likely than lesbian women to face stigma and avoidant prejudice from their heterosexual peers due to the sound of their voice, a new study in the British Journal of Social Psychology reports. Researchers also found that gay men who believe they sound gay anticipate stigma and are more vigilant regarding the reactions of others. (2021-02-23)

A research team identifies a metabolic footprint associated with the perception of satiety
The study was carried out in 140 volunteers suffering from overweight and obesity, and has showed that higher concentrations of glycine and linoleic acid are associated with a greater sensation of satiety, while saccharose and some sphingomyelins are negatively associated (that is to say, with a lower perception of satiety). Although metabolomics has been widely used in nutritional research, this is the first time it has been used to study the perception of satiety (2021-02-22)

Sleep is vital to associating emotion with memory, according to U-M study
When you slip into sleep, it's easy to imagine that your brain shuts down, but University of Michigan research suggests that groups of neurons activated during prior learning keep humming, tattooing memories into your brain. (2021-02-22)

'In the blink of an eye' statistics
HSE University researchers Yuri Markov and Natalia Tiurina discovered that when people visually estimate the size of objects, they are also able to consider their distance from the observer, even if there are many such objects. The observers rely not only on the objects' retinal representation, but also on the surrounding context. The paper was published in the journal Acta Psychologica. (2021-02-19)

Neural pathway critical to correcting behavioral errors related to psych disorders found
Mount Sinai researchers have identified a neural pathway through which the brain detects errors and guides subsequent behavioral improvement (2021-02-19)

Human brain taps into visual cues when lacking a sense of touch - study
Evidence that a sense of our physical selves can develop even without the sense of touch has been uncovered in a new study by researchers in the UK and the United States. (2021-02-18)

Ultraviolet 'television' for animals helps us better understand them
University of Queensland scientists have developed an ultraviolet 'television' display designed to help researchers better understand how animals see the world. (2021-02-18)

Evidence shows how the human brain may tap into visual cues when lacking a sense of touch
Researchers at the University of Chicago, the University of Birmingham, and Bournemouth University have uncovered evidence that physical embodiment can occur without the sense of touch, thanks to a study involving two participants who lack the ability to feel touch. (2021-02-15)

How comparable different stress tests are
Scientists use many different tests to investigate what happens in the brain in people experiencing stress. It is unclear to what extent the various methods with which subjects are placed under stress are comparable to each other. In a meta-analysis, researchers compared 31 previous studies that had investigated stress using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The team worked out which regions of the brain are activated as standard during stress and which stress tests trigger similar activation patterns. (2021-02-12)

A new perceptually-consistent method for MSI visualization
Skoltech scientists have proposed a Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) method leveraging the unique features of human vision (2021-02-11)

White contours induce red hue
A color illusion that strongly induces color contrast effect has been found by a research team at the Toyohashi University of Technology. The powerful visual illusion clarified a century-old contradiction relating to simultaneous color contrast theory. The team demonstrated that the presence or absence of flanking contours formed from extremely thin white lines could be used to switch between contradictory visual phenomena. This solution is expected to contribute to industrial design and high-definition imaging. (2021-02-10)

Time perception and sense of touch: a new connection
The percept of time relates to the sense of touch. A new SISSA study ''A sensory integration account for time perception'' published in PLOS Computational Biology uncovers this connection. The main clue leading to the new theory is that the perceived duration of a vibration increases not only in relation to actual elapsed time but also in relation to the intensity of the vibration. (2021-02-10)

Object transparency reduces human perception of three-dimensional shapes
Toyohashi University of Technology discovered that when people judge the thickness of an object, objects with glass-like transparent optical properties are perceived to be flatter than they actually are. This discover may be useful for everyday applications, such as devices to assist with walking in people with low-vision or autonomous driving. (2021-02-10)

Experiment shows how our visual system avoids overloading
Russian researchers from HSE University have studied a hypothesis regarding the capability of the visual system to automatically categorize objects (i.e., without requiring attention span). The results of a simple and beautiful experiment confirmed this assumption. The paper was published in the journal Scientific Reports. The study was supported by a Russian Science Foundation grant. (2021-02-09)

Correspondence between representations in visual cortices and neural networks
A research group led by Nobuhiko Wagatsuma, Lecturer at Toho University, Akinori Hidaka, Associate Professor at Tokyo Denki University, and Hiroshi Tamura, Associate Professor at Osaka University, found that the neural network structure of attention prediction, based on deep learning used in the development of artificial intelligence, has similar characteristics to the cerebral mechanism of primates. (2021-02-08)

Audiovisual professionalisation affects how the brain perceives media content
According to a study conducted by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, the Instituto Radio Televisión Española and the Universidad Pablo de Olavide in Seville, audiovisual professionals decrease their eyeblink rate after cuts, suggesting that they can better manage the loss of visual information that blinking entails. (2021-02-05)

Link found between time perception, risk for developmental coordination disorder
Neuroscientists at McMaster University have found a link between children who are at risk for developmental coordination disorder (DCD), a common condition that can cause clumsiness, and difficulties with time perception such as interpreting changes in rhythmic beats. (2021-02-05)

COVID-19 health threat increases psychological distress among Black Americans
A new University of Georgia study examines the interplay between the perceptions of coronavirus threat and psychological distress among Black Americans. (2021-02-04)

Brain-related visual problems may affect one in 30 primary school children
A brain-related visual impairment, which until recently was thought to be rare, may affect one in every 30 children according to new research investigating the prevalence of Cerebral Visual Impairment [CVI]. The University of Bristol-led findings published today [3 February] in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, aim to raise awareness of CVI among parents and teachers to help them identify signs of the condition earlier. (2021-02-03)

How modern robots are developed
Robots are interesting to neuroscience and neuroscience is interesting to robots - this is what the article 'Neuroengineering challenges of fusing robotics and neuroscience' was about in the journal Science Robotics. Such collaborative development contributes to progress in both fields, bringing us closer to developing more advanced android robots and a deeper understanding of the structure of the human brain. And, to some extent, to combining biological organisms with machines, to create cybernetic organisms (cyborgs). (2021-02-03)

The benefits of reading outdoors
Investigators demonstrate that image luminance has opposite effects on the contrast sensitivity of cortical pathways signaling lights than darks. It impairs luminance discrimination for the brightest stimuli of the scene while improving it for the darkest stimuli, a mechanism that is needed to efficiently sample natural scenes. (2021-02-02)

Remyelinating drug could improve vision in patients with multiple sclerosis
A team led by a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside, reports a drug -- an estrogen receptor ligand called indazole chloride (IndCl) -- has the potential to improve vision in patients with multiple sclerosis, or MS. The study, performed on mice induced with a model of MS and the first to investigate IndCl's effect on the pathology and function of the complete afferent visual pathway, is published in Brain Pathology. (2021-02-02)

Alternate type of surgery may prevent total knee replacement
An underused type of knee surgery in younger patients, called high tibial osteotomy, shows considerable success in reducing the need for total knee replacement, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200934. (2021-02-01)

A study reveals that the brain distributes sensory information highly efficiently
Extracting information from a small fraction of neurons, according to a study published in Nature Communications, involving Rubén Moreno-Bote, a researcher at the Center for Brain and Cognition, together with researchers from the University of Zaragoza and the University of the Basque Country, led by Harvard University (USA). (2021-02-01)

Halved risk for severe retinal disease in extremely premature infants
Risk for a severe form of retinopathy of prematurity, which can cause blindness in extremely premature babies, was halved when the newborns were given a new supplement combining various fatty acids. This was shown in a Swedish study led from the University of Gothenburg. (2021-02-01)

Chinese spice helps unravel the mysteries of human touch
New insight into how human brains detect and perceive different types of touch, such as fluttery vibrations and steady pressures, has been revealed by UCL scientists with the help of the ancient Chinese cooking ingredient, Szechuan pepper. (2021-01-28)

In a tight spot
A newly discovered circuit helps fish to prioritize. (2021-01-27)

Hypnotic suggestions can make a complex task easy by helping vision fill in the blanks
New research demonstrates that hypnosis--the process of focusing a person's attention on a specific task or sensation--can turn a normally difficult visual task into a far easier one by helping individuals mentally ''fill in the gaps'' of missing visual cues. (2021-01-27)

Children cannot ignore what they hear when detecting emotions
Children determine emotion by what they hear, rather than what they see, according to new research. The first-of-its-kind study, by Durham University's Department of Psychology, looked at how children pick up on the emotions of a situation. They found that whilst adults prioritised what they see, young children showed an auditory dominance and overwhelmingly prioritised what they could hear. The researchers say their findings could benefit parents currently managing home learning and professional educators. (2021-01-26)

Growing up in a bilingual home has lasting benefits
New research has found that growing up in a bilingual home can provide unexpected cognitive benefits later in life. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, demonstrates for the first time that adults who acquired their second language as a young child (early bilinguals) are quicker at shifting attention and quicker at detecting visual changes compared to adults who learnt their second language later in life (late bilinguals). (2021-01-22)

Neuronal recycling: This is how our brain allows us to read
Is there an area and cognitive mechanism in our brain specifically devoted to reading? Probably not. According to new research, underlying reading there is evolutionarily ancient function more generally used to process many other visual stimuli. We process letters and words similarly to how we do with any visual stimulus: we identify basic features as shape, size, structure. On the basis of the statistical frequency of specific symbols, we can recognise orthography, understand it and immerse ourselves in the pleasure of reading. (2021-01-21)

'Aging well' greatly affected by hopes and fears for later life, OSU study finds
If you believe you are capable of becoming the healthy, engaged person you want to be in old age, you are much more likely to experience that outcome, a recent Oregon State University study shows. (2021-01-21)

Tiny high-tech probes reveal how information flows across the brain
A new study from researchers at the Allen Institute collected and analyzed the largest single dataset of neurons' electrical activity to glean principles of how we perceive the visual world around us. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, captures the hundreds of split-second electrical signals that fire when an animal is interpreting what it sees. (2021-01-20)

A biological strategy reveals how efficient brain circuitry develops spontaneously
Researchers have explained how the regularly structured topographic maps in the visual cortex of the brain could arise spontaneously to efficiently process visual information. This research provides a new framework for understanding functional architectures in the visual cortex during early developmental stages. (2021-01-19)

Eye tests predict Parkinson's-linked cognitive decline 18 months ahead
Simple vision tests can predict which people with Parkinson's disease will develop cognitive impairment and possible dementia 18 months later, according to a new study by UCL researchers. In a related study, the researchers also found that structural and functional connections of brain regions become decoupled throughout the entire brain in people with Parkinson's disease, particularly among people with vision problems. (2021-01-19)

Clumsy kids can be fit too
Clumsy kids can be as aerobically fit as their peers with better motor skills, a new Finnish study shows. The results are based on research conducted at the Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences of the University of Jyväskylä and the Institute of Biomedicine of the University of Eastern Finland, and they were published in Translational Sports Medicine. (2021-01-19)

Appreciating a flower's texture, color, and shape leads to better drone landings
A team of TU Delft and the Westphalian University of Applied Sciences researchers present an optical flow-based learning process that allows robots to estimate distances through the visual appearance (shape, color, texture) of the objects in view. This artificial intelligence (AI)-based learning strategy increases the navigation skills of small flying drones and entails a new hypothesis on insect intelligence. (2021-01-19)

Genetic rewiring behind spectacular evolutionary explosion in East Africa
Genetic rewiring could have driven an evolutionary explosion in the shapes, sizes and adaptations of cichlid fish, in East Africa's answer to Darwin's Galapagos finches. (2021-01-19)

Glass frogs living near roaring waterfalls wave hello to attract mates
A University of California, Berkeley, conservationist has discovered that the glass frog Sachatamia orejuela can be added to the list of species that make use of visual cues in response to their acoustic environments. This is the first time a member of the glass frog family (Centrolenidae) has been observed using visual communication in this manner. (2021-01-15)

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