Current Voice News and Events

Current Voice News and Events, Voice News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 18 | 716 Results
Gay men who 'sound gay' encounter more stigma and discrimination from heterosexual peers
Gay men are more likely than lesbian women to face stigma and avoidant prejudice from their heterosexual peers due to the sound of their voice, a new study in the British Journal of Social Psychology reports. Researchers also found that gay men who believe they sound gay anticipate stigma and are more vigilant regarding the reactions of others. (2021-02-23)

LGBT+ workers experience higher levels of conflict at work, shows new report
The CIPD is today launching a new research report, co-authored by the University of Bath's Dr Luke Fletcher, to highlight how LGBT+ workers tend to have a more negative experience of work. (2021-02-11)

Children cannot ignore what they hear when detecting emotions
Children determine emotion by what they hear, rather than what they see, according to new research. The first-of-its-kind study, by Durham University's Department of Psychology, looked at how children pick up on the emotions of a situation. They found that whilst adults prioritised what they see, young children showed an auditory dominance and overwhelmingly prioritised what they could hear. The researchers say their findings could benefit parents currently managing home learning and professional educators. (2021-01-26)

Scientists shed light on how and why some people report "hearing the dead"
Spiritualist mediums might be more prone to immersive mental activities and unusual auditory experiences early in life, according to new research. (2021-01-17)

Study explains role of bone-conducted speech transmission in speech production and hearing
The perception of our own voice depends on sound transmission through air (air-conducted) as well as through the skull bone (bone-conducted or BC). The transmission properties of BC speech are, however, not well understood. Now, scientists from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology report their latest findings on BC transmission under the influence of oral cavity sound pressure, which can boost BC-based technology and basic research on hearing loss and speech impairment. (2021-01-07)

Earable computing: A new research area in the making
Research Group (SyNRG) at UIUC is defining a new sub-area of mobile technology that they call ''earable computing.'' The team believes that earphones will be the next significant milestone in wearable devices, and that new hardware, software, and apps will all run on this platform. (2020-12-15)

Singing to preterm infants during kangaroo care reduces maternal anxiety
Premature births are stressful experiences that increase the risk of anxiety for mothers and may hinder the development of interaction between mother and infant. A new study indicates that the combination of singing and kangaroo care boosts the wellbeing of the mothers of preterm infants, also making it easier for them to establish a connection with their baby. (2020-12-14)

The German press disparages dissenting voices on climate change
According to research presented in an article published in the journal Media Culture & Society on 8 October by Lena von Zabern, winning alumni of the award for best master's degree final project in UPF Planetary Wellbeing, and Christopher D. Tulloch, her supervisor and researcher with the Department of Communication. (2020-11-26)

Predi-COVID preliminary results
Launched under the aegis of the Research Luxembourg COVID-19 Task Force on April 24th, ''Predi-COVID '' is a cohort study promoted by the Luxembourg Institute of Health that aims to identify the key risk factors and biomarkers associated with COVID-19 severity and comprehend the long-term health consequences of the disease. The protocol of the study was published on November 24th in the British Medical Journal Open, reinforcing the international visibility and success of this highly collaborative ''Made in Luxembourg'' project. (2020-11-24)

Material found in house paint may spur technology revolution
The development of a new method to make non-volatile computer memory may have unlocked a problem that has been holding back machine learning and has the potential to revolutionize technologies like voice recognition, image processing and autonomous driving. (2020-10-19)

Cows prefer "live" co-moo-nication, study reveals
Cows enjoy the sound of a human voice -- but are more relaxed by a face-to-face chat than when listening to a recorded voice through a loudspeaker. ''Live'' talking can be used to improve relationships between cattle and humans, therefore benefiting the animals' welfare. (2020-10-15)

Sound the alarm: More effective ways to awaken families during house fire
Researchers from the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Sleep Disorders Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital conducted a series of studies to identify smoke alarm signals that would more effectively awaken children and other members of the household in the event of a fire. (2020-10-12)

Phone calls create stronger bonds than text-based communications
New research from The University of Texas at Austin suggests people too often opt to send email or text messages when a phone call is more likely to produce the feelings of connectedness they crave. (2020-09-11)

The case of ibuprofen: evidence of huge impact of COVID-19 misinformation when coming from credible sources
Researchers analysed the digital life of fake news about the adverse effects of ibuprofen in coronavirus patients, driven by a tweet posted by a French minister (2020-09-04)

Mother bats use baby talk to communicate with their pups
When addressing infants, human adults tend to change the speed, pitch and ''color'' of their voice. This ''baby talk'' is known to facilitate language learning. According to new research at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, it may not be exclusive of humans. Some bats have their own version of ''baby talk'' to communicate with their pups. (2020-08-18)

Security gap allows eavesdropping on mobile phone calls
Calls via the LTE mobile network, also known as 4G, are encrypted and should therefore be tap-proof. However, researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum have shown that this is not always the case. They were able to decrypt the contents of telephone calls if they were in the same radio cell as their target, whose mobile phone they then called immediately following the call they wanted to intercept. They exploit a flaw that some manufacturers had made in implementing the base stations. (2020-08-12)

Primate voice boxes are evolving at rapid pace
Scientists have discovered that the larynx, or voice box, of primates is significantly larger relative to body size, has greater variation, and is under faster rates of evolution than in other mammals. (2020-08-11)

Jobs for the boys: How children give voice to gender stereotyped job roles
Children, and especially boys, show stronger stereotyping about masculine and feminine jobs than previously suspected, an innovative study by the University of Sussex reveals. (2020-07-27)

Even if you want to, you can't ignore how people look or sound
Your perceptions of someone you just met are influenced in part by what they look like and how they sound. But can you ignore how someone looks or how they sound if you're told it is not relevant? Probably not, at least in most cases, a new study found. (2020-07-22)

From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
Do children have to wait until age 8 to recognize -- spontaneously and without instructions -- the same emotion of happiness or anger depending on whether it is expressed by a voice or on a face? Scientists from the University of Geneva and the Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences have compared the ability of children and adults to make a spontaneous link between a heard voice and the corresponding emotional expression on a natural or virtual. (2020-06-30)

Smartphone app uses voice recordings to detect fluid in the lungs
Voice analysis by a smartphone app identifies lung congestion in heart failure patients, allowing early intervention before their condition deteriorates. The small study is presented today on HFA Discoveries, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2020-06-19)

As food insecurity continues to plague New Yorkers, impact on children is worrisome
One in four households with children have reported a child experiencing hunger as a result of the COVID-19 health crisis, according to the latest CUNY SPH COVID-19 tracking survey. Many New Yorkers continued to report difficulties in getting the food they needed, but of particular concern is the impact on households with children under the age of 18. (2020-06-15)

Do you want a cheerleader or a critic? The Voice shows how we really choose our mentors.
We think that we will choose our personal and professional advisors based on reasoned criteria about their expertise, competence and experience. In practice, we go more with our gut than our head, choosing the person who shows enthusiasm for us and our goals. A team of researchers has used the popular singing competition show The Voice to prove it. (2020-06-11)

Timing of maturity, feelings about ethnicity and race can positively affect black males' self-concept, well-being
Black males start puberty at younger ages than males of other racial or ethnic groups, and early puberty has been linked to risks for negative outcomes, yet we know little about how black males navigate the changes in their bodies or understand their social identities. A new study explored how young African-American and Caribbean black males understand these matters and how variations in their understanding affect their self-concept and well-being. (2020-05-05)

People think robots are pretty incompetent and not funny, new study says
Detecting gender bias against robots was the original intent of a study that revealed two surprises: The gender bias didn't appear. In its place, people were predisposed to find robots mostly incompetent -- no matter the gender. (2020-05-05)

Grainger engineers voice localization techniques for smart speakers
Smart speakers offer a variety of capabilities to help free up both our time and our hands. We can hear the morning news while brushing our teeth, ask for a weather report while picking out a coat, and set a timer for the oven while handling two hot pans at once. According to Voicebot.ai, Alexa is supporting more than 100,000 skills worldwide, but one task it hasn't mastered is determining user location in the home. (2020-03-11)

UTSA finds the best method to teach children augmented reality
Researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) identified the best approach to help children operate augmented reality (AR). According to UTSA computer science experts, a major barrier into wider adoption of the technology for experiential learning is based on AR designs geared toward adults that rely on voice or gesture commands. By conducting in-classroom testing among elementary school students, UTSA researchers uncovered that AR programs are best delivered using controller commands, followed by programs that communicate with age-specific language. (2020-02-25)

Linguistics: The pronunciation paradox
Learners of foreign languages can hear the errors in pronunciation that fellow learners tend to make, but continue to fall foul of them themselves despite years of practice. A new study of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich shows that everyone believes their own pronunciation to be best. (2020-02-07)

Siri, help me quit -- what does your smart device say when you ask for help with addiction?
A new study published in Nature Partner Journal's Digital Medicine finds that the leading intelligent virtual assistants fail to understand questions about where to find help for substance misuse. Intelligent virtual assistants were frequently confused providing no response, and in one instance the response was for a recommendation on where to buy drugs. But the study's authors remain optimistic that smart devices could be a game changer for helping the millions now seeking help with addiction and the millions more to come. (2020-01-29)

Hey Google, are my housemates using my smart speaker?
Surveys show that consumers are worried that smart speakers are eavesdropping on their conversations and day-to-day lives. Now University of British Columbia researchers have found that people are also concerned about something else: friends, family and others who may have access to these devices. (2020-01-28)

Male sparrows are less intimidated by the songs of aging rivals
Few singers reach their sunset years with the same voice they had in younger days. Songbirds are no different. New research reveals that elderly swamp sparrows don't sound quite like they used to -- nor do they strike the same fear in other males who may be listening in. Humans are remarkably good at guessing a person's age by their voice. But this is the first time the phenomenon has been demonstrated in wild animals. (2020-01-17)

Using voice analysis to track the wellness of patients with mental illness
A new study finds that an interactive voice application using artificial intelligence is as accurate at tracking the wellbeing of patients being treated for serious mental illness as their own physicians. (2020-01-15)

From as young as 4, children see males as more powerful than females
As early as 4 years old, children associate power and masculinity, even in countries considered to be more egalitarian like Norway. This is what scientists at the Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod (CNRS/UCBL1) report, in collaboration with the universities of Oslo (Norway), Lausanne and Neuchâtel (Switzerland), in a study published on Jan. 7, 2020, in Sex Roles. They also show that in some situations the power-masculinity association does not manifest in girls. (2020-01-09)

Stand out from the herd: How cows commoonicate through their lives
Research has for the first time shown that cows maintain individual vocalisation throughout their lives. PhD candidate Alexandra Green from the University of Sydney explains why farmers should take note to improve animal welfare and dairy production. (2019-12-17)

Incumbent CEOs working with new CFOs earn 10% more money
Researchers studied more than 20 years of data from S&P 1500 firms and found CEOs took home an average of 10% more compensation when working with a CFO who was hired after them, also known as a 'co-opted' CFO. (2019-12-04)

LGBTQ beauty vloggers draw on queer culture to stand out
New Cornell research explores how a racially diverse group of LGBTQ beauty vloggers navigates seemingly contradictory roles: masculine and feminine; authentic and heavily made up. (2019-11-20)

Lost Lou Reed recording for Andy Warhol discovered by Cornell musicologist
Lost Lou Reed recording for Andy Warhol discovered by Cornell musicologist. (2019-10-30)

How the brain dials up the volume to hear someone in a crowd
Our brains have a remarkable ability to pick out one voice from among many. Now, a team of Columbia University neuroengineers has uncovered the steps that take place in the brain to make this feat possible. Today's discovery helps to solve a long-standing scientific question as to how the brain's listening center can decode and amplify one voice over others. It also stands to spur development of hearing-aid technologies and brain-computer interfaces that more closely resemble the brain. (2019-10-21)

A mathematical model reveals long-distance cell communication mechanism
An interdisciplinary collaborative team at KAIST has identified how a large community can communicate with each other almost simultaneously even with very short distance signaling. (2019-10-15)

Scientists improve voiceprint collection
Researchers from HSE University and Nizhny Novgorod State Linguistic University (LUNN) have developed a new method for ensuring quality in automatic voice recording. Resistant to background noise of 10dB and higher, the new algorithm can operate in real-time, making it possible to use the software to collect voice biometrics for a wide variety of purposes. The article was published in the journal Measurement Techniques. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11018-019-01617-x (2019-10-01)

Page 1 of 18 | 716 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.