Nav: Home

Current Volcanology News and Events

Current Volcanology News and Events, Volcanology News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 2 | 64 Results
Oregon-led research opens fresh view on volcanic plumbing systems
Volcanic eruptions such as Mount St. Helens' in 1980 show the explosiveness of magma moving through the Earth's crust. (2017-07-10)
Tracking the build-up to volcanic eruptions
ASU scientists discover that sub-millimeter zircon crystals record the flash heating of molten rock leading up to an explosive eruption 700 years ago. (2017-06-15)
Report identifies grand challenges to better prepare for volcanic eruptions
Despite broad understanding of volcanoes, our ability to predict the timing, duration, type, size, and consequences of volcanic eruptions is limited, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2017-04-19)
Drones collect measurements from a volcanic plume at Volcán de Fuego, Guatemala
A team of volcanologists and engineers from the Universities of Bristol and Cambridge have collected measurements from directly within volcanic clouds, together with visual and thermal images of inaccessible volcano peaks. (2017-04-11)
Mars volcano, Earth's dinosaurs went extinct about the same time
Arsia Mons produced one new lava flow at its summit every 1 to 3 million years during the final peak of activity, about 50 million years ago. (2017-03-20)
Scientists develop a system that predicts the behavior of tsunamis in less than 10 minutes
The group of Differential Equations, Numerical Analysis and Applications (EDANYA, from its abbreviation in Spanish) at the University of Málaga (UMA) and the Department of Languages and Computer Systems at the University of Granada (UGR) have created a simulator that predicts in less than ten minutes the behavior of tsunamis generated by landslides. (2017-03-13)
Clues from past volcanic explosion help Manchester-led team model future activity
Researchers led by The University of Manchester have developed a model that will help civil defense agencies better judge the impact of future volcanic eruptions -- including those that threaten the UK population. (2016-12-20)
Magma-limestone interaction can trigger explosive volcanic eruptions -- and affect the global carbon cycle
In a new study researchers from Sweden and Italy show what happens when magma meets limestone on its way up to the surface. (2016-08-08)
Ancient super-eruptions in Yellowstone Hotspot track 'significantly larger' than expected
International team led by researchers from the University of Leicester report 12 giant eruptions around the Snake River Plain in the United States between 8 and 12 million years ago. (2016-03-24)
A rock star
UCSB geologist John Cottle is awarded the Geological Society of America's MGPV Early Career award. (2016-01-27)
Study finds 'frictional heat' as a new trigger for explosive volcanic eruptions
A new study into magma ascent by geoscientists at the University of Liverpool has found that temperature may be more important than pressure in generating gas bubbles which trigger explosive volcanic eruptions. (2016-01-04)
Supervolcanoes likely triggered externally, study finds
Supervolcanoes, massive eruptions with potential global consequences, appear not to follow the conventional volcano mechanics of internal pressure building until the volcano blows. (2015-11-04)
Connecting people and geology on volcanoes
Luke Bowman, who received his Ph.D. from Michigan Tech this summer, gets to the heart of geohazards on the San Vicente Volcano in El Salvador. (2015-07-31)
'Eternal flames' of ancient times could spark interest of modern geologists
Seeps from which gas and oil escape were formative to many ancient cultures and societies. (2015-05-18)
Geologist who modernized volcanology wins the 2015 Vetlesen Prize
Stephen Sparks, a geologist at the University of Bristol who helped bring volcanology into the modern era, is the 2015 recipient of the Vetlesen Prize, considered the Nobel Prize of the earth sciences. (2015-01-20)
Earth's magnetic field could flip within a human lifetime
A study by scientists from Italy, France, UC Berkeley and Columbia University demonstrates that Earth's last magnetic reversal took place 786,000 years ago and happened very quickly, in less than 100 years -- roughly a human lifetime. (2014-10-14)
Citizen scientists saving lives around deadly 'Throat of Fire' volcano
Citizen scientists are saving the lives of people living in the shadow of deadly volcanoes according to research from the University of East Anglia. (2014-08-22)
Springer to collaborate with 5 Japanese societies on an open-access journal
Springer is starting an open-access publication of the journal Earth, Planets and Space (EPS) on behalf of five academic societies in Japan. (2014-05-12)
Against the current with lava flows
Primeval lava flows formed the massive canyons and gorge systems on Mars. (2014-05-12)
New insight may help predict volcanic eruption behavior
A new discovery in the study of how lava dome volcanoes erupt may help in the development of methods to predict how a volcanic eruption will behave, say scientists at the University of Liverpool. (2014-05-04)
Deep origins to the behavior of Hawaiian volcanoes
Kīlauea volcano typically has effusive eruptions, wherein magma flows to create ropy pāhoehoe lava, for example. (2014-04-29)
A new species of horse, 4.4 million years old
Researchers, including a scientist from Case Western Reserve University, have announced the discovery of a new species of fossil horse from 4.4 million-year-old fossil-rich deposits in Ethiopia. (2013-12-12)
3D model reveals new information about iconic volcano
The volcano on the Scottish peninsula Ardnamurchan is a popular place for the study of rocks and structures in the core of a volcano. (2013-10-10)
Water and lava, but -- curiously -- no explosion
A new study finds that hollow, land-based lava pillars in Iceland likely formed in a surprising reaction where lava met water without any explosion occurring. (2013-10-09)
Columbia River Flood Basalt Province detailed in new GSA special paper
Even though the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province is the smallest and youngest flood basalt province in the world, it still covers nearly 210,000 square kilometers of the US Pacific Northwest. (2013-09-26)
Some volcanoes 'scream' at ever-higher pitches until they blow their tops
Swarms of small earthquakes often precede a volcanic eruption. They can reach such rapid succession that they create a (2013-07-14)
Elsevier launches open access journal: GeoResJ
Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, is pleased to announce the launch of a new open access journal, GeoResJ. (2013-06-19)
Unrestricted access to the details of deadly eruptions
Details of around 2,000 major volcanic eruptions which occurred over the last 1.8 million years have been made available in a new open access database, complied by scientists at the University of Bristol with colleagues from the UK, US, Colombia and Japan. (2013-01-18)
2013 General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union
Journalists, science writers, and public information officers can now register online to the 2013 General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union. (2012-12-12)
Rare rhino fossil preserved by prehistoric volcanic eruption
Less than two percent of the earth's fossils are preserved in volcanic rock, but researchers have identified a new one: the skull of a rhino that perished in a volcanic eruption 9.2 million years ago. (2012-11-21)
Taking the 'pulse' of volcanoes using satellite images
A new study by scientists at the University of Miami in GRL uses satellite data to investigate deformation prior to the eruption of active volcanoes in Indonesia's west Sunda arc. (2012-11-05)
Scientists identify trigger for explosive volcanic eruptions
Scientists from the University of Southampton have identified a repeating trigger for the largest explosive volcanic eruptions on Earth. (2012-10-12)
The brief but violent life of monogenetic volcanoes
A new study in the journal Geology is shedding light on the brief but violent lives of maar-diatreme volcanoes, which erupt when magma and water meet in an explosive marriage below the surface of the earth. (2012-10-03)
Sumatra faces yet another risk -- major volcanic eruptions
The early April earthquake of magnitude 8.6 that shook Sumatra was a grim reminder of the devastating earthquakes and tsunami that killed tens of thousands of people in 2004 and 2005. (2012-05-16)
Geological cycle causes biodiversity booms and busts every 60 million years, research suggests
A mysterious cycle of booms and busts in marine biodiversity over the past 500 million years could be tied to a periodic uplifting of the world's continents, scientists report in the latest issue of the Journal of Geology. (2012-02-22)
Alexandra Witze and Jane Qiu awarded EGU Science Journalism Fellowship
The European Geosciences Union has named journalists Alexandra Witze and Jane Qiu as the winners of its first Geosciences Communications Fellowship for proposals on volcanology and climate change reporting, respectively. (2012-01-31)
Geophysicists to develop computer simulations of earthquake fault systems
Geophysicists at the University of California, Riverside, have received a $4.6 million grant from the National Science Foundation to study the dynamics of earthquake fault systems. (2011-09-19)
Dynamic Africa
Despite the general acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics for decades now, geoscientists still have much to learn about the processes involved in the breakup of continents and the formation of new ocean basins. (2011-07-06)
Expert knowledge in your pocket: The latest titles from the Geological Field Guide series
The Geological Field Guide series is a set of small, pocket sized books, designed for use in the field. (2011-04-13)
Ancient raindrops reveal a wave of mountains sent south by sinking Farallon plate
Analyzing the isotope ratios of ancient raindrops preserved in soils and lake sediments, Stanford researchers have shown that a wave of mountain building began in British Columbia, Canada about 49 million years ago and rolled south to Mexico. (2010-12-17)
Page 1 of 2 | 64 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2017

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2017. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Oliver Sipple
One morning, Oliver Sipple went out for a walk. A couple hours later, to his own surprise, he saved the life of the President of the United States. But in the days that followed, Sipple's split-second act of heroism turned into a rationale for making his personal life into political opportunity. What happens next makes us wonder what a moment, or a movement, or a whole society can demand of one person. And how much is too much?  Through newly unearthed archival tape, we hear Sipple himself grapple with some of the most vexing topics of his day and ours - privacy, identity, the freedom of the press - not to mention the bonds of family and friendship.  Reported by Latif Nasser and Tracie Hunte. Produced by Matt Kielty, Annie McEwen, Latif Nasser and Tracie Hunte. Special thanks to Jerry Pritikin, Michael Yamashita, Stan Smith, Duffy Jennings; Ann Dolan, Megan Filly and Ginale Harris at the Superior Court of San Francisco; Leah Gracik, Karyn Hunt, Jesse Hamlin, The San Francisco Bay Area Television Archive, Mike Amico, Jennifer Vanasco and Joey Plaster. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Future Consequences
From data collection to gene editing to AI, what we once considered science fiction is now becoming reality. This hour, TED speakers explore the future consequences of our present actions. Guests include designer Anab Jain, futurist Juan Enriquez, biologist Paul Knoepfler, and neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris.