Current Wage Differences News and Events

Current Wage Differences News and Events, Wage Differences News Articles.
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The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say scientists
Personality has been described in all sorts of animal species, from ants to apes. Some individuals are shy and sedentary, while others are bold and active. Now a new study published in Ecology and Evolution has revealed that the way a fish swims tells us a lot about its personality. (2021-02-23)

Addressing the biological causes of racial disparities in prostate cancer
A new review published in Cancer Reports examines the biological differences in the development of prostate cancer across ethnicities. (2021-02-18)

Neandertal genes alter neurodevelopment in modern human brain organoids
Building modern human brain organoids with the Neanderthal variant of a gene has provided a glimpse into the way substitutions in this gene impacted our species' evolution. (2021-02-11)

South Africa: the rising temperatures will cost up to 20% of per capita GDP
Reduced wage gap between high-skilled and low-skilled workers, and severe impacts on economic productivity. Climate change effects on economics and labour in a new study led by the CMCC Foundation and EIEE (RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment). (2021-02-02)

Addressing power differences may spur advantaged racial groups to act for racial equality
When different groups of people come into contact, what's the key to motivating advantaged racial groups to join historically disadvantaged racial minority groups to strive for racial equality and social justice? It's a complex conundrum studied for years by social scientists like Linda Tropp, professor of social psychology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. (2021-02-02)

Generous parental leave leads to staff shortages, nursing home deaths
A new paper in the Review of Economic Studies finds that a generous parental leave policy nurses enjoyed in Denmark caused nursing shortages, which resulted in a decline in the quality of hospital and nursing home care. The study estimates a large increase in nursing home mortality. (2021-01-28)

Risk-taking linked to particular brain features
There is a common genetic and neurobiological basis for risky behavior - the genetic disposition for risk-taking is mapped in several areas of the brain, a UZH study shows. The study combines genetic information and brain scans from more than 25,000 people for the first time. (2021-01-28)

Study reveals precarious employment on the rise long before COVID-19
A study led by a University of Illinois Chicago researcher uses a new approach to measure precarious, or low-quality, employment in the United States. And, according to those findings, precarious employment has increased 9% between 1988 and 2016. Precarious employment, or P.E., is defined as low-quality employment, which is often characterized by low wages, job insecurity and irregular hours, making employment risky and stressful for the worker. (2021-01-27)

Increase in minimum wage will save infant lives, study shows
A new study published recently by researchers from Syracuse University shows that a higher minimum wage will reduce infant deaths. (2021-01-26)

In ED patients with chest and abdominal pain, care delivered by physicians and APPs is si
In patients matched on complexity and acuity presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and abdominal pain, the care delivered by advanced practice providers (APPs) and emergency physicians is largely similar with respect to diagnostic test ordering and admission decisions. (2021-01-25)

Texas A&M research explores how melanoma grows and spreads
The first step in treating cancer is understanding how it starts, grows and spreads throughout the body. A relatively new cancer research approach is the study of metabolites, the products of different steps in cancer cell metabolism, and how those substances interact. (2021-01-12)

Astigmatism measures and corneal power obtained with different devices
The aim of the research is to compare the keratometric and total corneal astigmatism measures provided by three different technologies as well as to assess the level of interchangeability among them. (2020-12-22)

Brain tissue yields clues to causes of PTSD
A post-mortem analysis of brain tissue from people who had been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may help explain enduring mysteries about the disorder, such as why women are more susceptible to it and whether a dampened immune system response plays a role in dealing with stress, a team headed by Yale University researchers has found. (2020-12-21)

California lockdown suppressed excess pandemic deaths
Nearly 20,000 more Californians died in the first six months of the pandemic than would have been expected to die in a normal year, with a disproportionate number of those deaths occurring among older adults, black or Latino residents, or those who had not completed high school, according to an analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco. (2020-12-21)

Flexible working time as an opportunity to save costs and increase productivity
The Covid-19 pandemic has turned flexible working arrangements a new reality, but differences in employees' preferences and the financial implications for companies still require unravelling. (2020-12-15)

Effects of organohalogen pollution are coded in gene expression profiles of Baltic salmon
Researchers of Ehime University and the University of Helsinki measured hepatic organohalogen (OHC) concentrations and gene expression profiles in Atlantic salmon collected from three areas in the Baltic Sea. The results showed that OHCs and gene expression profiles were individually grouped in three areas and the covariation of the two datasets provided by a multivariate method was significantly similar. This suggests that the gene expression profiles in salmon are affected by OHC contamination. (2020-12-15)

When you can't afford to go on lockdown
Researchers at HSE University and Lomonosov Moscow State University analyzed data on Russians' movements during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Their analysis showed that residents of lower-income municipalities self-isolated less compared to residents of higher-income cities. The findings were published in the journal Environment and Planning A. (2020-12-14)

A biased evaluation of employees' performance can be useful for employers
In assessing an employee's performance, employers often listen to his immediate supervisor or colleagues, and these opinions can be highly subjective. Sergey Stepanov, an economist from HSE University, has shown that biased evaluations can actually benefit employers. An article substantiating this finding was published in the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization. (2020-12-10)

Engaged dads can reduce adolescent behavioral problems, improve well-being
In low-income families, fathers who are engaged in their children's lives can help to improve their mental health and behavior, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study published in the journal Social Service Review. (2020-12-09)

The gut microbiome in polycystic ovary syndrome and its association with metabolic traits
University of Tartu researchers and their collaborators from Finland and Spain investigated the relationship between the gut microbiome and polycystic ovary syndrome. Their study revealed that women with polycystic ovary syndrome in their late reproductive years have significant microbial changes in gut-related to their metabolic health. (2020-12-08)

Research concluding noncompetes stifle workers forthcoming in multiple publications
The University of Maryland's Evan Starr has extensively studied noncompetes, with the same conclusion: the agreements hurt workers. (2020-12-07)

Unmet job expectations linked to a rise in suicide, deaths of despair
The study, published in JAMA Network Open, is the first to link the rise in suicide and drug-poisoning deaths among men without a college degree to declines in working-class jobs. (2020-12-02)

Better survival among women after lung cancer surgery
There are known differences in the survival rates of women and men with lung cancer. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden set out to investigate potential reasons behind this disparity, such as the presence of other underlying diseases and smoking status. The study, which was published in Chest, shows that women have better survival rates after lung cancer surgery than men, independent of other factors. (2020-11-23)

Changes to the brain's reward system may drive overeating in mice
A combination of innate differences and diet-induced changes to the reward system may predispose some mice to overeat, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-16)

Some U.S. states hit harder by COVID-19 food insecurity
Food insecurity in America is reaching an all-time high during the COVID-19 pandemic. But large regional differences exist in the severity of the impact. (2020-11-12)

Palm oil certification brings mixed outcomes to neighbouring communities
Research led by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found that Indonesian communities living near oil palm plantations are impacted in different ways, both positive and negative, during plantation development and certification. (2020-11-02)

Simple genetics control timing of chinook salmon migration
The complex migratory traits of northern California's Chinook salmon - which have led some to regard the early- versus late-migrating fish as different species - result from a single, small gene region, researchers report. (2020-10-29)

CU Denver study looks into the connection between religion and equal pay
Traci Sitzmann, an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Denver Business School, and Elizabeth Campbell, an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota, provide empirical evidence and an explanation into why religion perpetuates the gender wage gap. (2020-10-28)

Researcher found female candidates are more likely to discuss the economy than males
In a new study published in Politics & Policy, Deserai Crow, PhD, associate professor at the University of Colorado Denver in the School of Public Affairs, found significant differences in discussion topics between both party affiliation and gender. Narratives from both Republican and Democratic candidates in 48 U.S. House campaigns from the 2018 midterm election were analyzed in this study. (2020-10-26)

COVID: women are less likely to put themselves in danger
Women's attitudes and behaviors may have contributed to their reduced vulnerability and mortality. A survey conducted in 8 OECD countries shows that they consider the Coronavirus a more serious problem than men, are more likely to approve health policies and less likely to disregard them (2020-10-16)

Survey: More US Adults want the government to have a bigger role in improving peoples' lives than before the pandemic
The share of US adults who support an active government role in society increased by more than 40 percent during the initial pandemic response--up from 24 percent in September 2019 to 34 percent in April 2020. (2020-10-15)

Black police officers disciplined disproportionately for misconduct, IU research finds
An examination of racial differences in the disciplining of police officers in three of the largest U.S. cities consistently found that Black officers were more frequently disciplined for misconduct than White officers, despite an essentially equal number of allegations being leveled. This included allegations of severe misconduct. (2020-10-12)

Women's incomes improve when democrats hold public office, study finds
New research from the University of California San Diego reveals that democratic control of state houses leads to substantial improvement in women's incomes, wages, and unemployment relative to men. (2020-10-08)

Trust and income inequality fueling the spread of COVID-19
Trust in public institutions is linked to fewer COVID-19 deaths, but trust and belonging to groups is associated with more deaths, according to a wide-ranging, McGill-led study of 30-day COVID-19 mortality rates in 84 countries. Greater economic inequality is also associated with COVID-19 mortality. (2020-10-07)

Extra visit time with patients may explain wage gap for female physicians
A new study led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis sheds light on why female primary care physicians receive lower wages than their male counterparts. (2020-09-30)

Inequalities in premature deaths have increased between the rich and poor in Canada
Socioeconomic inequalities in premature deaths in Canada have increased over the last 25 years, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191723. (2020-09-28)

Bird genes are multitaskers, say scientists
Scientists from the University of Sheffield have found that although male and female birds have an almost identical set of genes, they function differently in each sex through a mechanism called alternative splicing. (2020-09-25)

New research highlights impact of COVID-19 on food security in Kenya and Uganda
CABI scientists have conducted new research highlighting the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on food security in Kenya and Uganda with more than two-thirds of those surveyed having experienced economic hardship due to the pandemic. Dr Monica Kansiime led a team of researchers who discovered, from a random sample of 442 respondents, that the proportion of food insecure people increased by 38% and 44% in Kenya and Uganda respectively. (2020-09-21)

Children with COVID-19 show different immune responses, but better outcomes than adults
A comparison of children and adults hospitalized with COVID-19 reveals pediatric patients, who had better outcomes and shorter hospital stays, displayed altered immune responses and more limited production of antibodies against infection. (2020-09-21)

US adults experienced increased COVID-19-related mental health challenges as the pandemic unfolded
US adults increasingly experienced symptoms associated with acute stress and depression as COVID-19 cases and deaths skyrocketed between mid-March and mid-April 2020, according to a study of more than 6,500 people from three large, nationally representative cohorts. These (2020-09-18)

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