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Current Wastewater News and Events, Wastewater News Articles.
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Turning (more) fat and sewage into natural gas
NC State University researchers have developed what is, to date, the most efficient means of converting sewage sludge and restaurant grease into natural gas. (2019-11-13)
Microplastics found in oysters, clams on Oregon coast, PSU study finds
Tiny threads of plastics are showing up in Pacific oysters and razor clams along the Oregon coast -- and the yoga pants, fleece jackets, and sweat-wicking clothing that Pacific Northwesterners love to wear are a source of that pollution, according to a new Portland State University study. (2019-11-12)
Wildlife in Catalonia carry bacteria resistant to antimicrobials used in human health
A study performed in Catalonia by IRTA-CReSA, UAB and Torreferrussa Wildlife Center demonstrates that the enteric bacteria of wildlife origin in Catalonia exhibits a high prevalence and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes. (2019-11-12)
Reassessing strategies to reduce phosphorus levels in the Detroit river watershed
In an effort to control the cyanobacteria blooms and dead zones that plague Lake Erie each summer, fueled by excess nutrients, the United States and Canada in 2016 called for a 40% reduction in the amount of phosphorus entering the lake's western and central basins, including the Detroit River's contribution. (2019-11-06)
University of Oklahoma geoscientist hopes to make induced earthquakes predictable
University of Oklahoma Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy assistant professor Xiaowei Chen and a group of geoscientists from Arizona State University and the University of California, Berkeley, have created a model to forecast induced earthquake activity from the disposal of wastewater after oil and gas production. (2019-11-06)
Oil and gas wastewater used for irrigation may suppress plant immune systems
A new Colorado State University study gives pause to the idea of using oil and gas wastewater for irrigation. (2019-10-31)
Microrobots clean up radioactive waste (video)
According to some experts, nuclear power holds great promise for meeting the world's growing energy demands without generating greenhouse gases. (2019-10-30)
Mapping international drug use through the world's largest wastewater study
A seven-year project monitoring illicit drug use in 37 countries via wastewater samples shows that cocaine use was skyrocketing in Europe in 2017 and Australia had a serious problem with methamphetamine. (2019-10-23)
Mapping international drug use by looking at wastewater
Wastewater-based epidemiology is a rapidly developing scientific discipline with the potential for monitoring close to real-time, population-level trends in illicit drug use. (2019-10-23)
Researchers find antibiotic resistant genes prevalent in groundwater
The spread of antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) through the water system could put public safety at-risk. (2019-10-04)
Major environmental challenge as microplastics are harming our drinking water
Plastics in our waste streams are breaking down into tiny particles, causing potentially catastrophic consequences for human health and our aquatic systems, finds research from the University of Surrey and Deakin's Institute for Frontier Materials. (2019-09-09)
Cheap water treatment
There's nothing new in treating water by sorption of organic solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE). (2019-09-09)
Plant research could benefit wastewater treatment, biofuels and antibiotics
Chinese and Rutgers scientists have discovered how aquatic plants cope with water pollution, a major ecological question that could help boost their use in wastewater treatment, biofuels, antibiotics and other applications. (2019-09-05)
Bad Blooms: Researchers review environmental conditions leading to harmful algae blooms
When there is a combination of population increase, wastewater discharge, agricultural fertilization, and climate change, the cocktail is detrimental to humans and animals. (2019-08-26)
Cleaning pollutants from water with pollen and spores -- without the 'achoo!' (video)
In addition to their role in plant fertilization and reproduction, pollens and spores have another, hidden talent: With a simple treatment, these cheap, abundant and renewable grains can be converted into tiny sponge-like particles that can be used to grab onto pollutants and remove them from water, scientists report. (2019-08-26)
Improved sewage treatment has increased biodiversity over past 30 years
A higher standard of wastewater treatment in the UK has been linked to substantial improvements in a river's biodiversity over the past 30 years. (2019-08-14)
When naproxen breaks down, toads croak
A new study in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry takes a harder look at the effects a common anti-inflammatory medication and its degradation products have on amphibians. (2019-08-12)
Predicting earthquake hazards from wastewater injection
ASU-led geoscientists develop a method to forecast seismic hazards caused by the disposal of wastewater after oil and gas production. (2019-07-29)
Energy from seawater
A new battery made from affordable and durable materials generates energy from places where salt and fresh waters mingle. (2019-07-29)
Antibiotic-resistant genes found in London's canals and ponds
Central London's freshwater sources contain high levels of antibiotic-resistant genes, with the River Thames having the highest amount, according to research by UCL. (2019-07-25)
Fracking activities may contribute to anxiety and depression during pregnancy
A new study led by a researcher at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health identifies a link between proximity to hydraulic fracking activities and mental health issues during pregnancy. (2019-07-24)
New map outlines seismic faults across DFW region
Scientists from SMU, The University of Texas at Austin and Stanford University found that the majority of faults underlying the Fort Worth Basin are as sensitive to forces that could cause them to slip as those that have hosted earthquakes in the past. (2019-07-23)
Many Dallas-Fort Worth area faults have the potential to host earthquakes, new study finds
A study led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that the majority of faults underlying the Fort Worth Basin are as sensitive to changes in stress that could cause them to slip as those that have generated earthquakes in recent years. (2019-07-23)
Water solutions without a grain of salt
Monash University researchers have developed technology that can deliver clean water to thousands of communities worldwide. (2019-07-23)
KIST uesed eco-friendly composite catalyst and ultrasound to remove pollutants from water
Developed eco-friendly, low-cost, and high-efficiency wastewater processing catalyst made from agricultural byproduct, and High efficiency and removal rate achieved through application of ultrasound stimulation, leading to high expectation for the development of an environmental hormone removal system. (2019-07-19)
Stronger earthquakes can be induced by wastewater injected deep underground
Earthquakes are getting deeper at the same rate as the wastewater sinks. (2019-07-16)
Human waste an asset to economy, environment, study finds
Human waste might be an unpleasant public health burden, but scientists at the University of Illinois see sanitation as a valuable facet of global ecosystems and an overlooked source of nutrients, organic material and water. (2019-07-08)
Global survey shows crAssphage gut virus in the world's sewage
A global survey shows that a family of gut bacteria viruses called crAssphage is found in people -- and their sewage -- all over the world. (2019-07-08)
Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. (2019-06-19)
Study: Marijuana use increases, shifts away from illegal market
A new article published by researchers from University of Puget Sound and University of Washington reports that, based on analysis of public wastewater samples in at least one Western Washington population center, cannabis use both increased and substantially shifted from the illicit market since retail sales began in 2014. (2019-06-18)
Catalog of north Texas earthquakes confirms continuing effects of wastewater disposal
A comprehensive catalog of earthquake sequences in Texas's Fort Worth Basin, from 2008 to 2018, provides a closer look at how wastewater disposal from oil and gas exploration has changed the seismic landscape in the basin. (2019-06-11)
Improvements in water quality could reduce ecological impact of climate change on rivers
Improvements in water quality could reduce the ecological impact of climate change on rivers, finds a new study by Cardiff University's Water Research Institute and the University of Vermont. (2019-06-03)
Antibiotics found in some of the world's rivers exceed 'safe' levels, global study finds
Concentrations of antibiotics found in some of the world's rivers exceed 'safe' levels by up to 300 times, the first ever global study has discovered. (2019-05-26)
Science Snapshots -- May 2019
Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have predicted fascinating new properties of lithium; a powerful combination of experiment and theory has revealed atomic-level details about how silver helps transform carbon dioxide gas into a reusable form; new study reports the first comprehensive, highly coordinated effort to examine the global diversity and biogeography of activated sludge microbiome. (2019-05-24)
Table scraps can be used to reduce reliance on fossil fuels
Wasted food can be affordably turned into a clean substitute for fossil fuels. (2019-05-23)
Where there's waste there's fertilizer
Scientists recycle phosphorus by combining dairy and water treatment leftovers. (2019-05-15)
OU study expands understanding of bacterial communities for wastewater treatment system
A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary global study expands the understanding of activated sludge microbiomes for next-generation wastewater treatment and reuse systems enhanced by microbiome engineering. (2019-05-13)
Water flea can smell fish and dive into the dark for protection
Zoologists at the University of Cologne have discovered the messenger substance responsible for the flight of the small planktonic crustacean Daphnia from fish in lakes. (2019-05-08)
Bacteria causing infections can be detected more rapidly
Prof. Young-Tae Chang, Dr. Nam Young Kang, Dr. Hwa-Young Kwon, and Xiao Liu of POSTECH Department of Chemistry developed a fluorescent probe, BacGo that can detect Gram-positive bacteria precisely and promptly. (2019-05-06)
Study suggests earthquakes are triggered well beyond fluid injection zones
Using data from field experiments and computer modeling of ground faults, researchers at Tufts University have discovered that the practice of subsurface fluid injection used in 'fracking' and wastewater disposal for oil and gas exploration could cause significant, rapidly spreading earthquake activity beyond the fluid diffusion zone. (2019-05-02)
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