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Current Water Quality News and Events

Current Water Quality News and Events, Water Quality News Articles.
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Study: Water births are as safe as land births for mom, baby
A new study found that water births are no more risky than land births, and that women in the water group sustain fewer first and second-degree tears. (2019-12-10)
Road salt pollutes lake in one of the largest US protected areas, new study shows
New research shows road salt runoff into Mirror Lake in Adirondack Park prevents natural water turnover and therefore poses a risk to the balance of its ecology. (2019-12-09)
Navigating navigating land and water
Centipedes not only walk on land but also swim in water. (2019-12-09)
Explaining the tiger stripes of enceladus
Slashed across the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus are four straight, parallel fissures or 'tiger stripes' from which water erupts. (2019-12-09)
Asian water towers are world's most important and most threatened
Scientists from around the world have assessed the planet's 78 mountain glacier-based water systems. (2019-12-09)
Liquid flow is influenced by a quantum effect in water
Researchers at EPFL have discovered that the viscosity of solutions of electrically charged polymers dissolved in water is influenced by a quantum effect. (2019-12-09)
NASA examines Tropical Cyclone Belna's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Cyclone Belna. (2019-12-09)
Siberian blue lakes and their inhabitants
There are picturesque but poorly studied blue lakes situated in Western Siberia. (2019-12-05)
Water management grows farm profits
A study investigates effects of irrigation management on yield and profit. (2019-12-04)
Studying water quality with satellites and public data
The researchers built a novel dataset of more than 600,000 matchups between water quality field measurements and Landsat imagery, creating a 'symphony of data.' (2019-12-04)
Rural decline not driven by water recovery
New research from the University of Adelaide has shown that climate and economic factors are the main drivers of farmers leaving their properties in the Murray-Darling Basin, not reduced water for irrigation as commonly claimed. (2019-12-04)
How to improve water quality in Europe
Toxic substances from agriculture, industry and households endanger water quality in Europe -- and by extension, ecosystems and human health. (2019-12-03)
The impact of molecular rotation on a peculiar isotope effect on water hydrogen bonds
Quantum nature of hydrogen bonds in water manifests itself in peculiar physicochemical isotope effects: while deuteration often elongates and weakens hydrogen bonds of typical hydrogen-bonded systems composed of bulky constituent molecules, it elongates but strengthens hydrogen bonds of water molecular aggregates. (2019-12-02)
Smarter strategies
Though small and somewhat nondescript, quagga and zebra mussels pose a huge threat to local rivers, lakes and estuaries. (2019-12-02)
Throwing cold water on ice baths: Avoid this strategy for repairing or building muscle
New research suggests that ice baths aren't helpful for repairing and building muscle over time, because they decrease the generation of protein in muscles. (2019-12-02)
Providing safe, clean water
In many parts of the world, access to clean drinking water is far from certain. (2019-11-29)
Industrial bread dough kneaders could use physics-based redesign
When making bread, it's important not to overknead the dough, because this leads to a dense and tight dough due to a reduced water absorption capacity that impairs its ability to rise. (2019-11-26)
Joint statement from six journals highlights concerns about EPA proposed rule
In a joint journal statement in this issue, the editors-in-chief of six scientific journals (Science, Nature, Cell, PNAS, PLOS and The Lancet) highlight their concerns regarding the 2018 'Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science' rule proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which has recently returned to the spotlight following a hearing on evidence in policy-making. (2019-11-26)
A study compares how water is managed in Spain, California and Australia
Legislative changes in these three regions always come about due to drought crises but they show important differences. (2019-11-25)
Increase in cannabis cultivation or residential development could impact water resources
Cannabis cultivation could have a significant effect on groundwater and surface water resources when combined with residential use, evidence from a new study suggests. (2019-11-22)
UT mathematician develops model to control spread of aquatic invasive species
Adjusting the water flow rate in a river can prevent invasive species from moving upstream and expanding their range. (2019-11-21)
Reservoir management could help prevent toxic algal blooms in Great Lakes
Managing reservoirs for water quality, not just flood control, could be part of the solution to the growth of toxic algal blooms in the Great Lakes, especially Lake Erie, every summer. (2019-11-19)
Sierra Nevada has oldest underground water recharge system in Europe
Scientists from the University of Granada, the IGME, and the Universities of Cologne and Lisbon have demonstrated that the careo irrigation channels of Sierra Nevada constitute the oldest underground aquifer recharge system on the continent. (2019-11-18)
Bees 'surf' atop water
Ever see a bee stuck in a pool? He's surfing to escape. (2019-11-18)
Get over it? When it comes to recycled water, consumers won't
If people are educated on recycled water, they may come to agree it's perfectly safe and tastes as good -- or better -- than their drinking water. (2019-11-18)
eDNA reveals where endangered birds of a feather flock together
For the first time, Australian scientists have shown that environmental DNA (eDNA) can be used to detect the presence of an endangered bird species simply by collecting a cupful of water from the pools where they drink. (2019-11-15)
The global distribution of freshwater plants is controlled by catchment characteristics
Unlike land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to CO2 to compensate for the low availability of CO2 in water. (2019-11-15)
NASA looks at Tropical Depression Kalmaegi's water vapor concentration
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Philippine Sea, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Tropical Depression Kalmaegi. (2019-11-15)
Rubber in the environment
The tread on the tyre is worn out, new tyres are needed. (2019-11-14)
Global climate change concerns for Africa's Lake Victoria
UH Researcher and team developed a model to project lake levels in world's largest tropical lake (2019-11-14)
Water could modulate the activity and selectivity of CO2 reduction
A recent study compared the reaction mechanisms of CO2 hydrogenation over the stepped Cu(211) surface in the absence and presence of water by microkinetic simulations. (2019-11-14)
A study warns about the ecological impact caused by sediment accumulation in river courses
Insects, crustaceans and other water macroinvertebrates are more affected by the effect of sediment accumulation in river courses than the excess of nitrate in water environments, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2019-11-13)
Urban development reduces flash flooding chances in arid West
Urban development in the eastern United States results in an increase in flash flooding in nearby streams, but in the arid West, urbanization has just the opposite effect, according to a Penn State researcher, who suggests there may be lessons to be learned from the sharp contrast. (2019-11-13)
Satellite and reanalysis data can substitute field observations over Asian water tower
Satellite data sets are found reliable to reproduce the total column water vapor characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau. (2019-11-12)
New Pitt research finds carbon nanotubes show a love/hate relationship with water
New research in the journal Carbon reveals that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a coating can both repel and hold water in place, a useful property for applications like printing, spectroscopy, water transport, or harvesting surfaces. (2019-11-12)
Half of Piedmont drinking wells may exceed NC's hexavalent chromium standards
A new study which combines measurements from nearly 1,400 drinking water wells across North Carolina estimates that more than half of the wells in the state's Piedmont region contain levels of cancer-causing hexavalent chromium in excess of state safety standards. (2019-11-12)
Study investigates a critical transition in water that remains liquid far below 0 °C
The theoretical model proposed by Brazilian researchers can be applied to any system in which two energy scales coexist. (2019-11-11)
NUS engineers invent smartphone device that detects harmful algae in 15 minutes
A team of engineers from the National University of Singapore has developed a highly sensitive system that uses a smartphone to rapidly detect the presence of toxin-producing algae in water within 15 minutes. (2019-11-07)
Choosing most cost-effective practices for sites could save in bay cleanup
Using site-specific watershed data to determine the most cost-effective agricultural best management practices -- rather than requiring all the recommended practices be implemented across the entire watershed -- could make staying below the Chesapeake Bay's acceptable pollution load considerably less expensive. (2019-11-07)
Why is ice so slippery
The answer lies in a film of water that is generated by friction, one that is far thinner than expected and much more viscous than usual water through its resemblance to the 'snow cones' of crushed ice we drink during the summer. (2019-11-05)
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