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Current Water Quality News and Events

Current Water Quality News and Events, Water Quality News Articles.
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Inside the ice giants of space
A new theoretical method paves the way to modelling the interior of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, thanks to computer simulations on the water contained within them. (2020-08-10)
Breakthrough technology purifies water using the power of sunlight
A research team, led by Australia's Monash University, has been able to transform brackish water and seawater into safe, clean drinking water in less than 30 minutes using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and sunlight. (2020-08-10)
New global study shows 'best of the last' tropical forests urgently need protection
The world's 'best of the last' tropical forests are at significant risk of being lost, according to a paper released today in Nature Ecology and Evolution. (2020-08-10)
Forest growth in drier climates will be impacted by reduced snowpack, PSU study finds
A new study suggests that future reductions in seasonal snowpack as a result of climate change may negatively influence forest growth in semi-arid climates, but less so in wetter climates. (2020-08-10)
Subpolar marginal seas play a key role in making the subarctic Pacific nutrient-rich
A group of researchers from three Japanese universities has discovered why the western subarctic Pacific Ocean, which accounts for only 6 percent of the world's oceans, produces an estimated 26 percent of the world's marine resources. (2020-08-07)
Identifying and contending with radioisotopes of concern at Fukushima
In this Perspective, Ken Buesseler describes the enormous challenges that remain in doing clean-up on land in Japan following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster in 2011, even as some progress has been made offshore. (2020-08-06)
Ammonia-rich hail sheds new light on Jupiter's weather
New Juno results suggest that the violent thunderstorms taking place in Jupiter's atmosphere may form ammonia-rich hail, or 'mushballs', that play a key role in the planet's atmospheric dynamics. (2020-08-05)
Finding toxic carcinogenic metals faster in foods and water
Finding out if the food and water we consume are safe from toxic and carcinogenic metals can now be much faster and simpler. (2020-08-04)
Reducing the adverse impact of water loss in cells
A University of Houston College of Medicine researcher has found how a protein inside the body reduces the adverse effects of hypertonicity, an imbalance of water and solutes inside cells, which leads to cell death. (2020-08-04)
Tiny plants crucial for sustaining dwindling water supplies: Global analysis
Miniscule plants growing on desert soils can help drylands retain water and reduce erosion, UNSW researchers have found. (2020-07-31)
New current that transports water to major 'waterfall' discovered in deep ocean
An international team discovered a previously unrecognized ocean current that transports water to one of the world's largest 'waterfalls' in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Bank Channel Overflow into the deep North Atlantic (2020-07-29)
How clean water technologies could get a boost from X-ray synchrotrons
In a new perspective, SLAC and University of Paderborn scientists argue that research at synchrotrons could help improve water-purifying materials in ways that might not otherwise be possible. (2020-07-28)
New study provides valuable historical dataset for Yellow River water management
Researchers led by Prof. LIU Yu from the Institute of Earth Environment of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators reconstructed natural runoff history for the middle reach of the YR from 1492 to 2013 CE to assess the effects of human activities. (2020-07-27)
Water molecules are gold for nanocatalysis
Nanocatalysts made of gold nanoparticles dispersed on metal oxides are very promising for the industrial, selective oxidation of compounds, including alcohols, into valuable chemicals. (2020-07-27)
Hydrogel mimics human brain with memorizing and forgetting ability
Hokkaido University researchers have found a soft and wet material that can memorize, retrieve, and forget information, much like the human brain. (2020-07-27)
Solar-driven membrane distillation technology that can double drinking water production
A joint research team from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), led by Dr. (2020-07-22)
New research finds graphene can act as surfactant
New research into graphene flakes has discovered that the material can act as a surfactant, for the first time demonstrating how it can be a versatile 2D stabiliser ideal for many industrial applications from oil extraction to paper processing. (2020-07-22)
Making comprehensive water resources modeling more accessible
A new large-scale, open source hydrological and water resources model developed at IIASA will support and enable different stakeholder groups and scientific communities to engage with a hydrological model and support their investigations. (2020-07-21)
New material can generate hydrogen from salt and polluted water
Developed a new 2D material to produce hydrogen, which is the basis of alternative energy. (2020-07-21)
National poll: Some parents may not properly protect children from the sun
While the majority of parents recognize the importance of sunscreen, they may not always use best practices to protect children from getting burned, a new national poll suggests. (2020-07-20)
Could mini-Neptunes be irradiated ocean planets?
Many exoplanets known today are ''super-Earths'', with a radius 1.3 times that of Earth, and ''mini-Neptunes'', with 2.4 Earth radii. (2020-07-20)
Bouncing bubbles shake up emulsion studies
Collisions of tiny air bubbles with water surfaces can reveal fundamental characteristics of foamy mixtures. (2020-07-20)
River plants counter both flooding and drought to protect biodiversity
'Water plants are a nuisance in streams, blocking the flow. (2020-07-17)
New insight into the origin of water on the earth
Scientists have found the interstellar organic matter could produce an abundant supply of water by heating, suggesting that organic matter could be the source of terrestrial water. (2020-07-17)
Where is the water during a drought?
In low precipitation periods - where and how is the limited available water distributed and what possibilities are there for improving retention in the soil and the landscape? (2020-07-17)
New study provides evidence for decades-old theory to explain the odd behaviors of water
A new study provides strong evidence for a controversial theory that at very cold temperatures water can exist in two distinct liquid forms, one being less dense and more structured than the other. (2020-07-16)
Can high-quality coral genomes be used to predict bleaching events?
In a new approach to conservation genetics, researchers used a high-quality genome of the coral Acropora millepora, along with environmental data, to study this coral's variable responses to climate change, a trait of key conservation importance. (2020-07-16)
NASA finds limited water vapor as depression 06E becomes a trough
When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, it gathered water vapor data on Tropical Depression 06E that showed it had opened up into a trough. (2020-07-15)
Dehydration increases amphibian vulnerability to climate change
Amphibians have few options to avoid the underappreciated one-two punch of climate change, according to a new study from Simon Fraser University researchers and others. (2020-07-15)
Pesticide mixtures a bigger problem than previously thought
New research led by The University of Queensland has provided the first comprehensive analysis of pesticide mixtures in creeks and rivers discharging to the Great Barrier Reef. (2020-07-14)
Simultaneous, reinforcing policy failures led to Flint water crisis, providing lessons during pandemic
Concurrent failures of federal drinking water standards and Michigan's emergency manager law reinforced and magnified each other, leading to the Flint water crisis, according to a University of Michigan environmental policy expert. (2020-07-13)
Climate change will cause more extreme wet and dry seasons, researchers find
The world can expect more rainfall as the climate changes, but it can also expect more water to evaporate, complicating efforts to manage reservoirs and irrigate crops in a growing world, according to a Clemson researcher whose latest work has been published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-07-13)
'Lab in a suitcase' could hold the key to safer water and sanitation for millions
Using smaller and less expensive versions of the same specialist equipment found in state-of-the-art microbiology laboratories, a new 'lab in a suitcase' developed by academics at Newcastle University,UK, and believed to be a world first, enables screening of millions of bacteria in a single water sample. (2020-07-13)
New solar material could clean drinking water
Providing clean water to Soldiers in the field and citizens around the world is essential, and yet one of the world's greatest challenges. (2020-07-13)
Farmers' climate change conundrum: Low yields or revenue instability
Climate change will leave some farmers with a difficult conundrum, according to a new study by researchers from Cornell University and Washington State University: Either risk more revenue volatility, or live with a more predictable decrease in crop yields. (2020-07-10)
Arctic Ocean changes driven by sub-Arctic seas
New research explores how lower-latitude oceans drive complex changes in the Arctic Ocean, pushing the region into a new reality distinct from the 20th-century norm. (2020-07-10)
Water-saving alternative forage crops for Texas livestock
With increasing drought conditions in the Texas High Plains, researchers test sorghum and pearl millet as alternatives to corn. (2020-07-09)
Extreme rainfall events cause top-heavy aquatic food webs
In research recently outlined in Nature, scientists across seven different sites throughout Central and South America replicated the extreme rainfall events predicted by climate change science. (2020-07-09)
Liquid water is more than just H2O molecules
Skoltech scientists in collaboration with researchers from the University of Stuttgart showed that the concentration of short-lived ions (H3O+ and OH-) in pure liquid water is much higher than that assumed to evaluate the pH, hence significantly changing our understanding of the dynamical structure of water. (2020-07-09)
The story behind a uniquely dark, wetland soil
Areas where landslides are common make hydric soil identification tricky. (2020-07-08)
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