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Current Water Quality News and Events, Water Quality News Articles.
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Northern lakes respond differently to nitrogen deposition
Nitrogen deposition caused by human activities can lead to an increased phytoplankton production in boreal lakes. (2017-02-06)
Life-cycle assessment study provides detailed look at decentralized water systems
'Evaluating the Life Cycle Environmental Benefits and Trade-Offs of Water Reuse Systems for Net-Zero Buildings,' published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, is the first-of-its-kind research utilizing life-cycle assessment (LCA). (2017-02-02)
A closer look at what caused the Flint water crisis
Flint, Michigan, continues to grapple with the public health crisis that unfolded as lead levels in its tap water spiked to alarming levels. (2017-02-01)
Salofa introduces a blue-green algae test developed by VTT and the University of Turku
Salofa Oy will commercialize the blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) test originally developed by the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and the University of Turku. (2017-01-31)
Understanding breakups
As interest and demand for nanotechnology continues to rise, so will the need for nanoscale printing and spraying, which relies on depositing tiny drops of liquid onto a surface. (2017-01-30)
Move over Bear Grylls! Academics build ultimate solar-powered water purifier
You've seen Bear Grylls turn foul water into drinking water with little more than sunlight and plastic. (2017-01-30)
How water can split into two liquids below zero
Did you know that water can still remain liquid below zero degrees Celsius? (2017-01-25)
Floating towards water treatment
Researchers have found engineered floating wetlands show promise for water treatment. (2017-01-25)
UD's Jaisi wins NSF Career Award for research on phosphorus in soil
Much like criminal forensic scientists use fingerprints to identify guilty parties at crime scenes, the University of Delaware's Deb Jaisi utilizes isotopic fingerprinting technology to locate the sources of phosphorus compounds and studies the degraded products they leave behind in soil and water. (2017-01-24)
Testing the waters
Researchers at the University of Alberta have conducted the first-ever study to use hydraulic fracturing fluids to examine effects on aquatic animals, such as rainbow trout. (2017-01-24)
New technique identifies micropollutants in New York waterways
Cornell University engineers have developed a new technique to test for a wide range of micropollutants in lakes, rivers and other potable water sources that vastly outperforms conventional methods. (2017-01-23)
Arctic melt ponds form when meltwater clogs ice pores
A team including University of Utah mathematician Kenneth Golden has determined how Arctic melt ponds form, solving a paradoxical mystery of how a pool of water actually sits atop highly porous ice. (2017-01-23)
Tough aqua material for water purification
Water purification processes usually make use of robust membranes for filtering off contaminants while working at high pressures. (2017-01-19)
Researchers discover greenhouse bypass for nitrogen
An international team discovers that production of a potent greenhouse gas can be bypassed as soil nitrogen breaks down into unreactive atmospheric N2. (2017-01-18)
Research shows driving factors behind changes between local and global carbon cycles
Pioneering new research has provided a fascinating new insight in the quest to determine whether temperature or water availability is the most influential factor in determining the success of global, land-based carbon sinks. (2017-01-17)
Solar power plan set to bring fresh water to out-of-reach villages
A solar-powered purification system could provide remote parts of India with clean drinking water for the first time. (2017-01-16)
Composite material for water purification
Fresh, clean water coming directly from the tap is a true luxury. (2017-01-13)
Adaptive management of soil conservation is essential to improving water quality
The quality of our rivers and lakes could be placed under pressure from harmful levels of soluble phosphorus, despite well-intended measures to reduce soil erosion and better manage and conserve farmland for crop production, a new study shows. (2017-01-13)
Affordable water in the US: A burgeoning crisis
If water rates continue rising at projected amounts, the number of US households unable to afford water could triple in five years, to nearly 36 percent, finds new research by a Michigan State University scholar. (2017-01-11)
Changing rainfall patterns linked to water security in India
Changes in precipitation, which are linked to the warming of the Indian Ocean, are the main reason for recent changes in groundwater storage in India. (2017-01-10)
Wastewater treatment upgrades result in major reduction of intersex fish
Upgrades to a wastewater treatment plant along Ontario's Grand River, led to a 70 per cent drop of fish that have both male and female characteristics within one year and a full recovery of the fish population within three years, according to researchers at the University of Waterloo. (2017-01-10)
Anthropogenic groundwater extraction impacts climate
Anthropogenic groundwater exploitation changes soil moisture and land-atmosphere water and energy fluxes, and essentially affects the ecohydrological processes and the climate system. (2017-01-09)
Investigators identify optimal conditions for growth of Legionella bacteria
The bacteria that cause Legionnaire's disease grow well in warm tap water installations with ample dissolved organic matter -- conditions that support the growth of biofilms. (2017-01-06)
Flood threats changing across US
A University of Iowa study finds the threat of flooding is increasing in the northern half of the United States and declining in the South. (2016-12-29)
Visualizing gene expression with MRI
A cellular gatekeeper for water molecules finds new use in magnetic resonance imaging. (2016-12-23)
NJIT's Sirkar named a 2016 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors
NJIT's Kamalesh Sirkar, a distinguished professor of chemical engineering acclaimed for his innovations in industrial membrane technology used to separate and purify air, water and waste streams and to improve the quality of manufactured products such as pharmaceuticals, solvents and nanoparticles, has been named a 2016 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. (2016-12-22)
New tag revolutionizes whale research -- and makes them partners in science
A sophisticated new type of 'tag' on whales that can record data every second for hours, days and weeks at a time provides a view of whale behavior, biology and travels never before possible, scientists reported today in a new study. (2016-12-22)
Fish sperm race for reproductive success
Many organisms compete for access to and acceptance by mates. (2016-12-21)
Fuel cells with PFIA-membranes
HZB scientists have teamed up with partners of 3M Company in order to explore the water management in an alternative proton exchange membrane type, called PFIA. (2016-12-19)
Rain out, research in
Researchers describe a fully automated, portable, and energy-independent rainout shelter. (2016-12-14)
Can you bounce water balloons off a bed of nails? Yes, says new study
A group of first year students at Roskilde University, supervised by Dr. (2016-12-13)
Switchgrass may be a good option for farmers who have lost fertile topsoil
A study from the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources has found that switchgrass, which is a perennial plant and used commonly for biofuel, improves soil quality and can be grown on farms that have lost fertile topsoil. (2016-12-13)
NIFA A=announces $5 million in funding for food, energy, and water systems research
The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced the availability of up to $5 million in funding for research to better understand how food, energy and water systems interact, and how they can be sustained. (2016-12-13)
The world's wet regions are getting wetter and the dry regions are getting drier
Research from the University of Southampton has provided robust evidence that wet regions of the earth are getting wetter and dry regions are getting drier but it is happening at a slower rate than previously thought. (2016-12-12)
Utah State University researchers receive American Water Resources Association Award
Utah State University researchers Enjie Li, Joanna Endter-Wada and Shujuan Li were honored with the 2016 William R. (2016-12-09)
Jumping water striders know how to avoid breaking of the water surface
When escaping from attacking predators, different water strider species adjust their jump performance to their mass and morphology in order to jump off the water as fast and soon as possible without breaking of the water surface. (2016-12-08)
Big data approach to water quality applied at shale drilling sites
A computer program is diving deep into water quality data from Pennsylvania, helping scientists detect potential environmental impacts of Marcellus Shale gas drilling. (2016-12-07)
Critical zone, critical research
The critical zone extends from the top of the tallest tree down through the soil and into the water and rock beneath it. (2016-12-07)
Research assesses impact of soil erosion on land and communities in East Africa
The impact of soil erosion on both the environmental and social well-being of communities in East Africa is to be explored in new research led by the University of Plymouth. (2016-12-06)
Top in US Chamber of Commerce's BusinessH2O Summit, Dec. 12, in Las Vegas
The summit will bring together policy experts, entrepreneurs, business leaders, and investors to discuss best practices in water policy. (2016-12-06)
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