Current Wave Height News and Events

Current Wave Height News and Events, Wave Height News Articles.
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'Missing ice problem' finally solved
During glacial periods, the sea level falls, because vast quantities of water are stored in the massive inland glaciers. To date, however, computer models have been unable to reconcile sea-level height with the thickness of the glaciers. (2021-02-23)

Low-level jets create winds of change for turbines
Global wind power capacity has increased more than fivefold over the past decade, leading to larger turbines, but low-level jets are one cause for concern. The effects of these strong, energetic wind flows depend on how high the wind flows are in relation to the turbines. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers considered three different scenarios in which the LLJs were above, below, and in the middle of the turbine rotors. (2021-02-23)

D-Wave demonstrates performance advantage in quantum simulation of exotic magnetism
Researchers at D-Wave Systems published a milestone study in collaboration with scientists at Google, demonstrating a computational performance advantage, increasing with both simulation size and problem hardness, to over 3 million times that of corresponding classical methods. This work was achieved on a practical application with real-world implications, simulating the topological phenomena behind the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics. This performance advantage is a meaningful step in the journey toward applications advantage in quantum computing. (2021-02-18)

Investigating the wave properties of matter with vibrating molecules
The working group led by Prof. Stephan Schiller, Ph.D. from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has used a novel, high-precision laser spectroscopic experiment to measure the internal vibration of the simplest molecule. This allowed the researchers to investigate the wave character of the motion of atomic nuclei with unprecedented accuracy. They present their findings in the current edition of Nature Physics. (2021-02-18)

Rich nations see virus rates fall quicker -- study
Richer countries were more likely to see rates of COVID-19 fall faster during the first wave of the pandemic, according to new research published in the journal Frontiers in Public Health. (2021-02-18)

Exaggerated radar data above the freezing level induced by terrain
Scientists find exaggerated radar data above the freezing level are induced by terrain. (2021-02-17)

To reduce stunting in India, space out births
Adequate spacing between births can help to alleviate the likelihood of stunting in children, according to a new study from TCI. Sunaina Dhingra and Prabhu Pingali find that differences in height between firstborn and later-born children may be due to inadequate time between births. When children are born at least three years after their older siblings, the height gap between them disappears. (2021-02-17)

Cells use concentration gradients as a compass
Biophysicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munch have developed a new theory, which accounts for the observation that cells can perceive their own shapes, and use this information to direct the distribution of proteins inside the cell. (2021-02-16)

A sharper look at the interior of semiconductors
A research team at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) developed a high-resolution imaging method based on extreme short-wave UV light. It can be used to examine internal structures in semiconductors non-destructively, and with nanometre precision as the team reported in the current issue of the journal 'Optica'. (2021-02-16)

Study finds alligator hearts keep beating no matter what
A new study reported by Georgia Tech researchers finds that an alligator heart will not fibrillate when exposed to drastic temperature changes, unlike a rabbit (mammal) heart, which is critically vulnerable to heart trauma under those conditions. The research could help better understand how the heart works and what can cause a deadly arrhythmia - which fundamentally happens when the heart doesn't pump blood correctly any longer. (2021-02-15)

The songs of fin whales offer new avenue for seismic studies of the oceanic crust
The songs of fin whales can be used for seismic imaging of the oceanic crust, providing scientists a novel alternative to conventional surveying. (2021-02-11)

Difficulties to care for ICU patients caused by COVID-19
Intensive care nurses highlight patient isolation, fear of the unknown and using nurses who do not usually work in the ICU as key factors in caring for critical COVID-19 patients (2021-02-10)

Virtual reality helping to treat fear of heights
Researchers from the University of Basel have developed a virtual reality app for smartphones to reduce fear of heights. Now, they have conducted a clinical trial to study its efficacy. Trial participants who spent a total of four hours training with the app at home showed an improvement in their ability to handle real height situations. (2021-02-10)

A new type of university is emerging to meet the challenges of today
A new type of university is emerging, one that steps beyond the American research university model and is nimble and responsive, takes responsibility for what happens outside its walls and can scale up to meet the demands and challenges of modern society. Arizona State University President Michael Crow says they are part of the ''fifth wave'' of universities. (2021-02-09)

Bats on the rise
Bats carried aloft to almost 2,000 metres by air currents (2021-02-09)

Quantum computing enables simulations to unravel mysteries of magnetic materials
A multi-institutional team became the first to generate accurate results from materials science simulations on a quantum computer that can be verified with neutron scattering experiments and other practical techniques. (2021-02-09)

A study presents an algorithm that automates electrocardiogram recordings
Artificial intelligence can help health personnel to diagnose heart diseases, as shown in a study published in Scientific Reports, by Guillermo Jiménez-Pérez and Oscar Camara, members of the PhySense group, and Alejandro Alcaine, a researcher at the University of San Jorge, Zaragoza. (2021-02-09)

1918 pandemic second wave had fatal consequences
In the event of a pandemic, delayed reactions and a decentralized approach by the authorities at the start of a follow-up wave can lead to longer-lasting, more severe and more fatal consequences, researchers from the universities of Zurich and Toronto have found. The interdisciplinary team compared the Spanish flu of 1918 and 1919 in the Canton of Bern with the coronavirus pandemic of 2020. (2021-02-08)

The pandemic lockdown's psychological impact on pregnant women
During the lockdown in the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain, pregnant women had higher symptoms of depression and anxiety. The finding comes from a study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, which also revealed that women with higher body mass index and lower social support were most affected. (2021-02-03)

New realm of personalized medicine with brain stimulation
Millions of patients suffering from neurological and mental disorders such as depression, addiction, and chronic pain are treatment-resistant. New research paves the way for a promising alternative: personalized deep brain stimulation. Researchers have found a way to predict what effect electrical stimulation will have on an individual's brain activity across multiple brain regions. The work represents a major step forward in achieving new therapies for a whole host of neurological and mental disorders. (2021-02-01)

Backreaction observed for first time in water tank black hole simulation
Scientists have revealed new insights into the behaviour of black holes with research that demonstrates how a phenomenon called backreaction can be simulated. (2021-02-01)

Astronomers spot bizarre activity from one of the strongest magnets in the Universe
Astronomers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) and CSIRO have just observed bizarre, never-seen-before behaviour from a 'radio-loud' magnetar--a rare type of neutron star and one of the strongest magnets in the Universe. Their new findings, published today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS), suggest magnetars have more complex magnetic fields than previously thought - which may challenge theories of how they are born and evolve over time. (2021-02-01)

Tsunamis and tsunami warning: recent progress and future prospects
There have been frequent tsunamis since the 21st century, drawing the attention of many countries on the study of tsunami mechanism and warning. Tsunami records also play an essential role in deriving earthquake rupture models in subduction zones. A recent paper reviews the recent progress and limitations of tsunami research, from the aspects of tsunami generation, propagation, inversion and warning. Potential tsunami warning strategies are discussed and future prospects on tsunami research are provided. (2021-02-01)

Neonatal antibiotic use associated with reduced growth in boys
Exposure to antibiotics in the first few weeks of life is associated with reduced weight and height in boys up to the age of six, but not girls, reports a paper in Nature Communications. The study, led by Prof. Omry Koren, of Bar-Ilan University, together with Prof. Samuli Rautava, of the University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, suggests that this effect may be due to changes in the development of the gut microbiome. (2021-01-26)

Metamaterial tiles boost sensitivity of large telescopes
A multi-institutional group of researchers has developed new metamaterial tiles that will help improve the sensitivity of telescopes being built at the preeminent Simons Observatory in Chile. (2021-01-26)

Optimal information about the invisible
Laser beams can be used to precisely measure an object's position or velocity. Normally, a clear, unobstructed view of this object is required. Irregular environments scatter the light beam - but as it turns out, precisely this effect can be used to obtain optimum information in difficult situations. (2021-01-25)

White turns into (extreme-)ultraviolet
Researchers from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have developed a new method to modify the spectral width of extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light. By employing a novel phase-matching scheme in four-wave mixing, they could compress the spectral width of the initial broadband light by more than hundred times. The detailed experimental and theoretical results have been published in Nature Photonics. (2021-01-25)

Nearly one in four families hesitant to take their child to ER during COVID-19 pandemic
During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly one in four families responded that they would be unlikely to bring their child to the Emergency Department if they had an emergency condition, according to a survey from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago published in the journal Academic Emergency Medicine. (2021-01-25)

Crystal structures in super slow motion
Laser beams are used to change the properties of materials in an extremely precise way. However, the underlying processes generally take place at such unimaginably fast speeds and at such a small scale that they have so far eluded direct observation. Göttingen researchers have now managed to film, for the first time, the laser transformation of a crystal structure with nanometre resolution and in slow motion in an electron microscope. The results were published in Science. (2021-01-22)

A method for calculating optimal parameters of liquid chrystal displays developed at RUDN University
A professor from RUDN University together with his colleagues from Saratov Chernyshevsky State University and D. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia developed a method for calculating the parameters of diffraction optical elements used in LCDs. In particular, the new technology can be used to expand the angle of view while preserving high resolution and color rendition. (2021-01-22)

Many junior doctors feel out of their depth with the end-of-life decisions faced during COVID-19 pandemic
In normal times, end-of-life care discussions are most commonly led by senior doctors. However, new research from a busy London hospital shows that the high numbers of deaths taking place in hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic, frequently out-of-hours, is leading to junior (foundation level) doctors having to lead on these difficult discussions with families, often with no formal experience or training. (2021-01-20)

Using ancient fossils and gravitational-wave science to predict earth's future
New research on predicting the earth's future climate: Using gravitational-wave science, a group of international scientists, including Australian OzGrav astrophysicist Ilya Mandel, studied ancient marine fossils as a predictor of climate change. (2021-01-19)

Psychological well-being declined during second wave of the pandemic - especially for men
Our psychological well-being follows the rise and fall of the infection rate, but whereas psychological well-being fell most for women during the spring lockdown, it is men who are hardest hit during the second wave. This is shown by a new study from Aarhus University, Denmark. (2021-01-19)

Heart attack patients in England 'fearful' of seeking medical help amid COVID crisis
Data analysis is revealing a second sharp drop in the number of people admitted to hospital in England with acute heart failure or a heart attack. The decline began in October, as the numbers of COVID-19 infections began to surge ahead of the second lockdown, which came into force in early November. (2021-01-19)

Where COVID-19 hit hardest, sudden deaths outside the hospital increased
A new study comparing the incidence of sudden deaths occurring outside the hospital across New York City's highly diverse neighborhoods with the percentage of positive SARS-CoV-19 tests found that increased sudden deaths during the pandemic correlate to the extent of virus infection in a neighborhood. The analysis appears in Heart Rhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, and the Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society, published by Elsevier. (2021-01-18)

Rethinking spin chemistry from a quantum perspective
Summary Researchers at Osaka City University use quantum superposition states and Bayesian inference to create a quantum algorithm, easily executable on quantum computers, that accurately and directly calculates energy differences between the electronic ground and excited spin states of molecular systems in polynomial time. (2021-01-18)

Study shows sharp decline in cancer screenings, diagnoses during the first COVID-19 surge
In one of the first studies to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer diagnoses, researchers at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center document a substantial decline in cancer and precancer diagnoses at the Northeast's largest health care system during the first peak of the pandemic because of a drop in the number of cancer screening tests performed. (2021-01-14)

Singing a tumor test song
Singing may be the next-generation, noninvasive approach to determining the health of a patient's thyroid. When a person sings, the vibrations create waves in the tissue near the vocal tract called shear waves. If a tumor is present in the thyroid, the elasticity of its surrounding tissue increases, stiffening, and causing the shear waves to accelerate. Using ultrasound imaging to measure these waves, researchers can determine the elasticity of the thyroid tissue. (2021-01-12)

'Galaxy-sized' observatory sees potential hints of gravitational waves
Scientists believe that planets like Earth bob in a sea of gravitational waves that spread throughout the universe. Now, an international team has gotten closer than ever before to detecting those cosmic ripples. (2021-01-11)

Arecibo observatory helps find possible 'first hints' of low-frequency gravitational waves
Data from Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico has been used to help detect the first possible hints of low-frequency disturbances in the curvature of space-time. The results were presented today at the 237th meeting of the American Astronomical Society, which was held virtually, and are published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters (2021-01-11)

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