Current Weed Control News and Events

Current Weed Control News and Events, Weed Control News Articles.
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Variable weather makes weeds harder to whack
From flooded spring fields to summer hailstorms and drought, farmers are well aware the weather is changing. It often means spring planting can't happen on time or has to happen twice to make up for catastrophic losses of young seedlings. According to a joint study between University of Illinois and USDA-ARS, it also means common pre-emergence herbicides are less effective. (2021-02-08)

Integrated disease management saves olive trees from Verticillium wilt
The University of Cordobas's Agronomy Department (abbreviated to DAUCO in Spanish) reduced the occurrence of Verticillium wilt in a commercial olive plantation by applying an Integrated Disease Management strategy. (2021-01-25)

Using VR training to boost our sense of agency and improve motor control
Patients with motor dysfunctions are on the rise across Japan as its population continues to age. A Tohoku University researcher has developed a new method of rehabilitation using virtual reality to increase the sense of agency over our body and aid motor skills. (2021-01-20)

Guppies have varying levels of self-control
Just like humans trying to stick to New Year's resolutions, guppies have varying levels of self-control, a new study shows. (2021-01-15)

Survey shows dicamba may reduce the effectiveness of junglerice controls
A recent survey featured in the journal Weed Technology explores the prevalence of junglerice in cotton and soybean crops and whether dicamba interferes with the effectiveness of herbicides used to control the weed. (2020-12-15)

Study shows the impact of genetic diversity on effective alligatorweed control
New research featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management (IPSM) shows that genetics matter when it comes to the effective control of alligatorweed, an invasive plant found in or near aquatic settings (2020-12-15)

Glyphosate can create biomarkers predicting disease in future generations
Exposure to the widely used weed-killer glyphosate makes genetic changes to rats that can be linked to increased disease in their grandchildren and great-grandchildren. These glyphosate-induced changes to sperm from exposed rats could be used as biomarkers for determining propensity in subsequent generations for prostate and kidney diseases as well as obesity and incurring multiple diseases at once. (2020-12-09)

Ultrasensitive transistor for herbicide detection in water
University of Tokyo researchers have fabricated a tiny electronic sensor that can detect very low levels of a commonly used weed killer in drinking water. (2020-12-01)

Scientists uncover the mysterious origin of canal grass in Panama
How did canal grass arrive in Panama? STRI staff scientist Kristin Saltonstall compared the DNA of sugar cane relatives from around the world to find out. (2020-11-30)

Scientific journal launches new series on the biology of invasive plants
The journal Invasive Plant Science and Management (IPSM) announced the launch of a new series focused on the biology and ecology of invasive plants. (2020-11-16)

Beetles cooperate in brood care
Ambrosia beetles are fascinating: they practice agriculture with fungi and they live in a highly developed social system. Biologist Peter Biedermann has now discovered new facts about them. (2020-11-04)

Cover crop could solve weed problems for edamame growers
For vegetable growers, weeds can mean lost income from reduced yield and foreign plant matter contaminating the harvest. But for many crops, particularly vegetable legumes, weed management options are very limited. (2020-10-13)

Studies explore the role of cover crops in suppressing glyphosate-resistant horseweed
Horseweed is considered one of the most troublesome weeds in the United States and Canada - able to produce devastating losses in both corn and soybean yields when left uncontrolled. Two recent studies - one published by the journal Weed Science and the other by the journal Weed Technology - provide insights on the role cover crops might play in controlling horseweed and reducing the need for herbicides. (2020-10-05)

Research explores factors influencing soybean injury by synthetic auxin herbicides
Synthetic auxin products have given growers an important option for managing weed populations resistant to glyphosate and other herbicides. But according to an article featured in the journal Weed Technology, there is one important downside to dicamba, 2,4-D and other synthetic auxins. They often move off-target and can cause severe injury to sensitive plants growing nearby. (2020-09-14)

An evolutionary roll of the dice explains why we're not perfect
Scientists have found that chance events can be more important than natural selection in defining the genome of species like humans and other mammals. (2020-09-09)

Once infected, twice infected
A key to surviving in the wild is fighting off infection -- and not just once. For plants, as with humans, one infection may or may not leave a plant with lasting immunity. Biologists conducted a series of elegant experiments that capture how pathogen strains naturally accumulate on plants over a growing season. Their findings, reported in Nature Ecology & Evolution, reveal the importance of understanding interactions among pathogens when developing strategies for maintaining healthy crop populations. (2020-08-31)

Genomes published for major agricultural weeds
Representing some of the most troublesome agricultural weeds, waterhemp, smooth pigweed, and Palmer amaranth impact crop production systems across the US and elsewhere with ripple effects felt by economies worldwide. In a landmark study, scientists have published the most comprehensive genome information to date for all three species, marking a new era of scientific discovery toward potential solutions. (2020-08-27)

Cover crop mixtures must be 'farm-tuned' to provide maximum ecosystem services
Penn State researchers, in a recent study, were surprised to learn that they could take the exact same number of seeds from the same plants, put them in agricultural fields across the Mid-Atlantic region and get profoundly different stands of cover crops a few months later. (2020-08-18)

Study calls for urgent plan to manage invasive weed which threatens livelihoods in Africa
Dr Arne Witt, lead author of the study published in the journal Bothalia, said that over half of farmers surveyed in the Karonga District of Malawi believe the weed, which more than 40 years ago had already been considered to be one of the 76 worst weeds in the world, believed the M. diplotricha to have reduced crop yields. (2020-08-03)

A simple screening process may enhance monoclonal antibody-based drug development
By screening potential monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based drugs solely based on a measure of their colloidal stability, scientists may be able to weed out mAbs that do not respond efficiently in solution early in the (2020-07-31)

Are cover crops negatively impacting row crops?
Research investigates if chemicals released by cover crops may be the cause for yield reductions (2020-07-30)

Iowa State University scientists examine reproductive effects of glyphosate in mice
A pair of recently published studies analyzed how ovarian function in mice responded to various levels of exposure to glyphosate, a chemical extensively used to kill weeds. The results showed exposure changed the level of some ovarian proteins but did not impact ovarian steroid production, an indication glyphosate may not adversely affect reproduction. (2020-07-28)

Food-grade wheatgrass variety released for public use
Farmers can now grow this superfood with environmental and health benefits. (2020-06-24)

Weed's wily ways explained in Illinois research
Like antibiotic-resistant bacteria, some herbicide-resistant weeds can't be killed by available chemicals. The problem affects more than just the errant weed in our driveways; herbicide-resistant weeds threaten our food supply, stealing resources and outcompeting the crops that make up our breakfast cereal and feed the nation's livestock. (2020-06-17)

Researchers discover what's behind nature's perhaps largest erection -- which is not that big
In the plant kingdom, the sexual organ of a male pollen grain grows up to a thousand times its own length as it sniffs its way forth to a female egg cell to deliver its two sperm cells. Now researchers at the University of Copenhagen have advanced the understanding of what makes pollen 'penises', called pollen tubes, grow. The newfound knowledge may prove valuable to understanding human nerve cells. (2020-06-15)

Study documents the challenges of herbicide-resistant annual bluegrass in turf
In an study featured in the journal Weed Science, researchers in Australia examined 31 populations of annual bluegrass suspected to be herbicide resistant. All 31 were found to be resistant to multiple turf herbicides. Three populations had evolved resistance to herbicides with five different mechanisms of action. (2020-06-05)

Global warming will lift agriculture weed threat
Invasive weeds pose a significant threat to global agriculture productivity -- and their threat will become more pronounced if the Earth's climate is affected by increased greenhouse gas concentration, according a Flinders University climate researcher. (2020-06-02)

Research explores the impact of invasive grasses on South Texas landscapes
Scientists writing for the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management say several exotic grass species once grown in South Texas for livestock forage and erosion control have expanded from the areas where they were planted and have become invasive. They now are reducing the region's biodiversity and the habitats available for wildlife. (2020-05-29)

Crops sown in a uniform spatial pattern produce higher yields and reduce environmental impact
Higher yields and fewer weeds are possible if farmers sow wheat, maize, soy and other crops in more uniform spatial patterns, according to University of Copenhagen researchers. More precise sowing can also help reduce herbicide use and fertiliser runoff. (2020-04-28)

New research explores the impact of cover crop residues on weed control
Cover crops have a well-documented role to play in suppressing troublesome weeds. But what happens as those cover crops degrade? (2020-04-23)

How atrazine regulations have influenced the environment
Opposing chemical trends linked to atrazine regulations from 1990s. (2020-04-22)

Got seasonal allergies? Beetles could help
Allergies caused by the common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, impact millions, and in Europe alone, around 13.5 million people suffer with symptoms, resulting in 7.4 billion Euros worth of health costs per year, according to the research. The study suggests the leaf beetle, Ophraella communa, could reduce the number of people affected by the pollen and the associated economic impacts, since the beetle -- itself a recent arrival in Europe -- loves to munch on the invasive plant. (2020-04-21)

Miller School researchers alert otolaryngologists about high COVID-19 transmission risk
A harsh reality has emerged as COVID-19 has spread around the globe. Several thousand doctors, nurses and others caring for COVID-19 patients are dying from the virus. To alert providers in otolaryngology, one of the hardest-hit medical specialties, about the high risk of transmission and how to avoid it, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers studied data from China. (2020-04-14)

MSU scientists discover legacy of past weather in stories of prairie plant restoration
Michigan State University's Lars Brudvig, associate professor in the Department of Plant Biology, and former MSU graduate student Anna Funk investigated fields of data going back 20 years to find out why some replanted prairies are healthier than others. Their research is published in Scientific Reports. (2020-04-06)

Organic soybean producers can be competitive using little or no tillage
Organic soybean producers using no-till and reduced-tillage production methods that incorporate cover crops -- strategies that protect soil health and water quality -- can achieve similar yields at competitive costs compared to tillage-based production. (2020-03-31)

Weedy rice is unintended legacy of Green Revolution
Weedy rice is a feral form of rice that infests paddies worldwide and aggressively outcompetes cultivated varieties. A new study led by biologists at Washington University in St. Louis shows that weed populations have evolved multiple times from cultivated rice, and a strikingly high proportion of contemporary Asian weed strains can be traced to a few Green Revolution cultivars that were widely grown in the late 20th century. (2020-03-25)

Research shows most bird feed contains troublesome weed seeds
Many millions of homeowners use feeders to attract birds. But a two-year study featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management suggests there may be one unintended consequence to this popular hobby. Bird feed mixtures may be helping to spread troublesome weeds that threaten agricultural crops. (2020-03-20)

Fall precipitation predicts abundance of curly top disease and guides weed management
Transmitted by an insect known as the beet leafhopper, curly top disease is a viral disease affecting many crops, including melons, peppers, sugar beets, and tomatoes. Curly top can kill or stunt the plants or result in poorly developed fruit or no fruit at all. (2020-03-12)

New aerial image dataset to help provide farmers with actionable insights
A dataset of large-scale aerial images produced by Intelinair, a spinout from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, aims to give farmers visibility into the conditions of their fields. The dataset, called Agriculture-Vision, will enable agricultural pattern analysis of aerial images, providing farmers with actionable insights into the performance of their crops to improve decision-making and maximize yields. (2020-03-06)

CABI scientists help discover new biological control for noxious parthenium weed in Pakistan
CABI scientists, as part of an international team of researchers, have discovered a new biological control in the fight against the highly noxious and invasive weed parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) in Pakistan. As outlined in a new paper published in the journal BioInvasions Records, the scientists report the first record of the rust species Puccinia abrupta var. partheniicola -- more commonly known as winter rust -- in the Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Provinces. (2020-03-04)

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