Current Wheat News and Events

Current Wheat News and Events, Wheat News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 995 Results
Making wheat and peanuts less allergenic
Research uses plant breeding and biotechnology to remove proteins associated with food allergies. (2021-01-27)

Fungi strengthen plants to fend off aphids
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that unique fungi strengthen the ''immune systems'' of wheat and bean plants against aphids. Fungi enter and influence the amount of a plant's own defences, resulting in fewer aphids. The results could serve to reduce agricultural insecticide use and bring Denmark a step further along the path towards its green transition. (2021-01-22)

New biodegradable polyurethane foams are developed from wheat straw
The polyurethane foams have several industrial uses. Now, a new paper, published on the front page of Polymers, was able to obtain them from biomass in order to avoid using petroleum by-products in their manufacturing (2021-01-19)

Mathematics explains how giant whirlpools form in developing egg cells
Cell-spanning whirlpools in the immature egg cells of animals such as mice, zebrafish and fruit flies quickly mix the cells' innards, but scientists didn't know how these flows form. Using mathematical modeling, researchers have found an answer. The gyres result from the collective behavior of rodlike molecular tubes called microtubules that extend inward from the cells' membranes, the researchers report. (2021-01-13)

The puzzle of nonhost resistance: why do pathogens harm some plants but not others?
There are many examples of plants that are susceptible to one pathogen but able to resist another closely related pathogen. By uncovering the mechanism behind resistance, we can obtain a deeper understanding of the plant immune system and can also uncover previously unknown aspects of immune signaling and regulation, which can help scientists improve resistance against a broader spectrum of pathogens. (2020-12-29)

2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend grains at all life stages
The Grain Chain, a farm to fork coalition of stakeholders in the grain industry sector and chaired by the American Bakers Association (ABA), celebrates the recommendation published today in the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) to ''consume half of your grains from whole grain sources'' and the remainder from enriched grains. A foundational piece of the DGAs, the guidelines recognize whole grains are ''one of the three food groups that are fundamental constituents of a healthy dietary pattern.'' (2020-12-29)

'Alarmingly high' vitamin D deficiency in the United Kingdom
Over 50 per cent of Asians living in the UK are severely deficient in vitamin D, leaving them more vulnerable to respiratory infections such as COVID-19 and musculoskeletal disorders, according to a large-scale population study published this week. (2020-12-14)

Study finds large-scale expansion of stem rust resistance gene in barley and oat lineages
Stem rust is one of the most devastating fungal diseases of wheat and historically has caused dramatic, widespread crop failures resulting in significant yield losses around the world. Stem rust epidemics in major wheat growing areas could cause a major threat to global food security. Scientists have identified a resistance gene, Sr22, as one of the few characterized genes that protects against a large array of stem rust races. (2020-12-07)

Researchers create ingredients to produce food by 3D printing
Food engineers in Brazil and France developed gels based on modified starch for use as ''ink'' to make foods and novel materials by additive manufacturing (2020-12-03)

New modified wheat could help tackle global food shortage
Researchers at the University of York have created a new modified wheat variety that increases grain production by up to 12%. (2020-11-25)

Landmark study generates first genomic atlas for global wheat improvement
In a landmark discovery for global wheat production, a University of Saskatchewan-led international team has sequenced the genomes for 15 wheat varieties representing breeding programs around the world, enabling scientists and breeders to much more quickly identify influential genes for improved yield, pest resistance and other important crop traits. (2020-11-25)

New wheat and barley genomes will help feed the world
An international research collaboration, including scientists from the University of Adelaide's Waite Research Institute, has unlocked new genetic variation in wheat and barley - a major boost for the global effort in breeding higher-yielding wheat and barley varieties. (2020-11-25)

Wheat diversity due to cross-hybridization with wild grasses
Bread wheat can grow in highly diverse regional environments. An important reason for its great genetic variety is the cross-hybridization with many chromosome fragments from wild grasses. This is shown by the genome sequences of 10 wheat varieties from four continents, which an international consortium including researchers from the University of Zurich has now decoded. (2020-11-25)

Global collaboration is unlocking wheat's genetic potential
In a paper published Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2020, in Nature, Kansas State University researchers, in collaboration with the international 10+ Genome Project led by the University of Saskatchewan, have announced the complete genome sequencing of 15 wheat varieties representing breeding programs around the world -- an invaluable resource to improve global wheat production. (2020-11-25)

Novel haplotype-led approach to increase the precision of wheat breeding
Wheat researchers at the John Innes Centre are pioneering a new technique that promises to improve gene discovery for the globally important crop. (2020-11-25)

Local cooking preferences drove acceptance of new crop staples in prehistoric China
The food preparation preferences of Chinese cooks -- such as the technological choice to boil or steam grains, instead of grinding or processing them into flour -- had continental-scale consequences for the adoption of new crops in prehistoric China, according to research from Washington University in St. Louis. The authors drew on data from the bones of nearly 2,500 humans to map patterns of changing cuisines over the course of 6,000 years. (2020-11-04)

The long and complex history of cereal cuisine in ancient China
Changing cuisines in ancient China were driven by multiple environmental and cultural practices over thousands of years, according to a study published November 4, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Xinyi Liu of Washington University in St. Louis and Rachel E. B. Reid of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Virginia. (2020-11-04)

Butterfly color diversity due to female preferences
Butterflies have long captured our attention due to their amazing color diversity. But why are they so colorful? A new publication led by researchers from Sweden and Germany suggests that female influence butterfly color diversity by mating with colorful males. (2020-10-27)

Extruded grains may be better for pigs
Extrusion is the norm in the pet and aqua feed industries, yet it remains unusual for swine feed in the United States. But the technology can improve energy and protein digestibility in pigs, according to research from the University of Illinois. (2020-10-23)

A RUDN University biologist described how a harmless bacterium turns into a phytopathogen
A researcher from RUDN University suggested that Xanthomonas bacteria that are harmful to plants might have developed from a nonpathogenic related species by receiving virulence genes from other species of bacteria. (2020-10-03)

Potential new tool for frost screening in crops
Agricultural scientists and engineers at the University of Adelaide have identified a potential new tool for screening cereal crops for frost damage. (2020-10-02)

Early introduction of gluten may prevent coeliac disease in children
Introducing high doses of gluten from four months of age into infants' diets could prevent them from developing coeliac disease, a study has found. (2020-09-28)

A red future for improving crop production?
Researchers have found a way to engineer more efficient versions of the plant enzyme Rubisco by using a red-algae-like Rubisco from a bacterium. For 50 years scientists have strived to boost the activity of Rubisco, a promising target to increase crop production, as it controls how much and how fast plants fix carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into sugars and energy during photosynthesis. (2020-09-28)

Unlocking the secrets of plant genomes in high resolution
Resolving genomes, particularly plant genomes, is a very complex and error-prone task. This is because there are several copies of all of the chromosomes and they are very alike. A team of bioinformatics researchers from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has now developed a software tool that allows for precise assignment to the correct copies - a process known as 'phasing'. They present their development in the latest online edition of the journal Genome Biology. (2020-09-21)

Farmer knowledge is key to finding more resilient crops in climate crisis
A new paper in Frontiers in Plant Science reviews the 'Seeds for Needs' approach that combines farmers' knowledge of resilient crops with 'elite' varieties identified by scientists. (2020-09-21)

Could breadfruit be the next superfood? UBC researchers say yes
A fruit used for centuries in countries around the world is getting the nutritional thumbs-up from a team of British Columbia researchers. Breadfruit, which grows in abundance in tropical and South Pacific countries, has long been a staple in the diet of many people. The fruit can be eaten when ripe, or it can be dried and ground up into a flour and repurposed into many types of meals, explains UBC Okanagan researcher Susan Murch. (2020-09-17)

New study identifies wheat varieties that resist the destructive stripe rust disease
Stripe rust is one of the most destructive wheat diseases in the world, especially in the United States. While the disease can be controlled by chemicals, those may be harmful to humans, animals, and the environment and the application can cost millions of dollars. Rather than use chemicals, many farmers would prefer to grow wheat varieties that resist stripe rust and the development of such varieties is a top priority for wheat breeding programs. (2020-09-17)

Successful improvement of the catalytic activity of photosynthetic CO2 fixing enzyme Rubisco
A research group consisting of Associate Professor FUKAYAMA Hiroshi (Kobe University) and Professor MATSUMURA Hiroyoshi (Ritsumeikan University) et al. have succeeded in greatly increasing the catalytic activity of Rubisco, the enzyme which fixes carbon from CO2 in plant photosynthesis. The research team also hypothesized the mechanism which determines the enzyme's catalytic activity. In the future, it is hoped that increasing the photosynthetic ability of agricultural crops will lead to improved yields. (2020-09-14)

Massive-scale genomic study reveals wheat diversity for crop improvement
Researchers have genetically characterized almost 80,000 samples of wheat from public germplasm banks, ''a massive-scale genotyping and diversity analysis'' of the two types of wheat grown globally -- bread and pasta wheat -- and of 27 known wild species. The results show distinct biological groupings within bread wheats and suggest that a large proportion of the genetic diversity present in landraces has not been used to develop new high-yielding, resilient and nutritious varieties. (2020-09-11)

To recreate ancient recipes, check out the vestiges of clay pots
UC Berkeley archaeologists have discovered that unglazed ceramic cookware can retain the residue of not just the last supper cooked, but earlier meals as well, opening a window onto gastronomic practices possibly going back millennia. (2020-09-11)

Wild cousins may help crops battle climate change
Wild relatives of our domestic crops already cope with harsh conditions and resist disease. Can we use them to help our preferred crops adapt? (2020-09-09)

Unmanned aerial vehicles help wheat breeders
Usually, breeders pick the best wheat lines by hand, but unmanned aerial vehicles that record certain measures of plant health can help breeders select wheat lines more efficiently. (2020-09-03)

'Madsen' wheat as source of disease resistance
Researchers show that 'Madsen,' a commonly used wheat variety, is resistant to more pests and diseases than recently thought, making it a good source of genes for breeding better wheat. (2020-08-13)

Cover crop roots are an essential key to understanding ecosystem services
To judge the overall effectiveness of cover crops and choose those offering the most ecosystem services, agricultural scientists must consider the plants' roots as well as above-ground biomass, according to Penn State researchers who tested the characteristics of cover crop roots in three monocultures and one mixture. (2020-08-13)

Gluten in wheat: What has changed during 120 years of breeding?
In recent years, the number of people affected by coeliac disease, wheat allergy or gluten or wheat sensitivity has risen sharply. But why is this the case? Could it be that modern wheat varieties contain more immunoreactive protein than in the past? Results from a study by the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research are helping to answer this question. (2020-08-11)

Wheat and couch grass can extract toxic metals from contaminated soils
Irina Shtangeeva is a researcher at the Department of Soil Science and Soil Ecology, St Petersburg University. She has studied the ability of wheat and couch grass to accumulate toxic substances. Both plants were capable of absorbing various chemical elements from contaminated soils. Although the plants were able to accumulate high concentrations of toxicants, they could survive under negative environmental conditions (2020-08-10)

New USask-led research reveals previously hidden features of plant genomes
An international team led by the Plant Phenotyping and Imaging Research Centre (P2IRC) at the University of Saskatchewan (USask) and researchers at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) has decoded the full genome for the black mustard plant--research that will advance breeding of oilseed mustard crops and provides a foundation for improved breeding of wheat, canola and lentils. (2020-08-10)

Are cover crops negatively impacting row crops?
Research investigates if chemicals released by cover crops may be the cause for yield reductions (2020-07-30)

Site-directed mutagenesis in wheat via haploid induction by maize
Site-directed mutagenesis facilitates the experimental validation of gene function and can speed up plant breeding by producing new biodiversity or by reproducing previously known gene variants in other than their original genetic backgrounds. However, its application is challenging in wheat owing to high genomic redundancy and highly genotype-dependent DNA transfer methods. (2020-07-21)

Free trade can prevent hunger caused by climate change
An international team of researchers investigated the effects of trade on hunger in the world as a result of climate change. The conclusion is clear: international trade can compensate for regional food shortages and reduce hunger, particularly when protectionist measures and other barriers to trade are eliminated. (2020-07-20)

Page 1 of 25 | 995 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.