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Current Wikipedia News and Events, Wikipedia News Articles.
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New 'tooth-on-a-chip' could lead to more personalized dentistry
A so-called ''tooth-on-a-chip'' could one day enable more personalized dentistry, giving dentists the ability to identify dental filling materials that work better and last longer based on a patient's own teeth and oral microbiome. The miniaturized tooth system is a thin slice of a human molar placed in between transparent rubber slides that are etched with tiny channels, through which fluids flow. It mimics a real tooth with a cavity. (2019-12-19)

Tsoi lives in Malaysian forests
Sergey Ermilov, a researcher from Tyumen State University, discovered and described a new species of oribatid mites that lives on the forest floors in Malaysia. The species was named Trachyoribates viktortsoii after Viktor Tsoi, a Soviet rock musician, songwriter, and artist who had a great influence both on the Russian culture in general and the discoverer of the new species in particular. (2019-12-11)

Japanese anime and zoos boost public interest in conservation of real-life animal characters
Animated shows with animal characters -- specifically the Japanese anime Kemono Friends -- can increase public interest in real wildlife, including boosting donations to conservation programs at zoos. A new national analysis in Japan highlights the potential of entertainment-conservation partnerships to increase public interest in the natural world even as communities become increasingly urbanized. (2019-11-26)

Rise of the bots: Stevens team completes first census of Wikipedia bots
Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology, in Hoboken, N.J., have completed the first analysis of all 1,601 of Wikipedia's bots, using computer algorithms to classify them by function and shed light on the ways that machine intelligences and human users work together to improve and expand the world's largest digital encyclopedia. (2019-11-21)

New artificial intelligence system automatically evolves to evade internet censorship
UMD researchers developed a tool called Geneva (short for Genetic Evasion), which automatically learns to circumvent censorship. Tested in China, India and Kazakhstan, Geneva found dozens of ways to circumvent censorship by exploiting gaps in censors' logic and finding bugs that the researchers say would have been virtually impossible to find manually. Geneva is being presented during a peer-reviewed talk at the Association for Computing Machinery's 26th Conference on Computer and Communications Security in London, November 14, 2019. (2019-11-13)

Hubble captures a dozen sunburst arc doppelgangers
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed a galaxy in the distant regions of the Universe which appears duplicated at least 12 times on the night sky. This unique sight, created by strong gravitational lensing, helps astronomers get a better understanding of the cosmic era known as the epoch of reionisation. (2019-11-07)

Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant meso
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system. (2019-11-05)

Kallikrein 6 protease advances colon tumorigenesis via induction of the high mobility group A2 protein
In the CRC patients, KLK6 protein levels were elevated in the non-cancerous distant and adjacent tissues, compared to their paired tumor tissues. Patients with mutant K-RAS tumors had significantly higher level of KLK6 protein in the luminal surface of non-cancerous distant tissue, compared to the corresponding tissues of the patients with K-RAS wild type tumors. (2019-10-22)

Rapamycin for longevity -- Opinion article
The scientist discusses several reasons, including fear of the actual and fictional side effects of rapamycin, everolimus and other clinically-approved drugs, arguing that no real side effects preclude their use as anti-aging drugs today. (2019-10-16)

Scientists at the MDI biological laboratory are decoding the genetic mechanisms of aging
A new paper by MDI Biological Laboratory scientists Jarod Rollins, Ph.D., and Aric Rogers, Ph.D., co-corresponding authors, describes the mechanisms by which longevity is regulated post-transcriptionally, or after a genetic blueprint has been transcribed from an organism's DNA. The identification of these mechanisms will serve as a road map for screening new, more specific drugs to prolong healthy lifespan. The laboratory, located in Bar Harbor, Maine, focuses on research on regeneration and aging. (2019-10-10)

VISTA unveils a new image of the Large Magellanic Cloud
ESO's VISTA telescope reveals a remarkable image of the Large Magellanic Cloud, one of our nearest galactic neighbors. VISTA has been surveying this galaxy and its sibling the Small Magellanic Cloud, as well as their surroundings, in unprecedented detail. This survey allows astronomers to observe a large number of stars, opening up new opportunities to study stellar evolution, galactic dynamics, and variable stars. (2019-09-13)

Hubble reveals latest portrait of Saturn
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 observed Saturn on 20 June 2019 as the planet made its closest approach to Earth this year, at approximately 1.36 billion kilometres away. (2019-09-12)

Hubble showcases new portrait of Jupiter
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope reveals the intricate, detailed beauty of Jupiter's clouds in this new image taken on June 27, 2019. It features the planet's trademark Great Red Spot and a more intense colour palette in the clouds swirling in the planet's turbulent atmosphere than seen in previous years. (2019-08-08)

Anatomy of a cosmic seagull
Colourful and wispy, this intriguing collection of objects is known as the Seagull Nebula, named for its resemblance to a gull in flight. Made up of dust, hydrogen, helium and traces of heavier elements, this region is the hot and energetic birthplace of new stars. The remarkable detail captured here by ESO's VLT Survey Telescope (VST) reveals the individual astronomical objects that make up the celestial bird, as well as the finer features within them. (2019-08-07)

BU researchers use amazon reviews and AI to predict product recalls
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can take months to identify and verify a problem before issuing a product recall, so most recalls come from manufacturers, often after enough people have gotten sick to generate bad press. But soon, artificial intelligence could comb through online reviews to identify serious threats to public health, and speed the process of a product recall. (2019-08-05)

Physicists make graphene discovery that could help develop superconductors
When two mesh screens are overlaid, beautiful patterns appear when one screen is offset. These 'moiré patterns' have long intrigued artists, scientists and mathematicians and have found applications in printing, fashion and banknotes. Now, a Rutgers-led team has paved the way to solving one of the most enduring mysteries in materials physics by discovering that in the presence of a moiré pattern in graphene, electrons organize themselves into stripes, like soldiers in formation. (2019-08-01)

Hubble discovers mysterious black hole disc
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed an unexpected thin disc of material encircling a supermassive black hole at the heart of the spiral galaxy NGC 3147, located 130 million light-years away. (2019-07-11)

'Tsunami' on a silicon chip: a world first for light waves
A collaboration between the University of Sydney Nano Institute and Singapore University of Technology and Design has for the first time manipulated a light wave, or photonic information, on a silicon chip that retains its overall 'shape'. This foundational work is important because most communications infrastructure still relies on silicon-based devices for propagation and reception of information. Manipulating solitons on-chip could potentially allow for the speed up of photonic communications devices and infrastructure. (2019-07-03)

100-year-old physics model replicates modern Arctic ice melt
A nearly 100-year-old physics model captures the essential mechanism of pattern formation and geometry of Arctic melt ponds. (2019-06-17)

The Wikipedia gender gap
In a recent University of Washington study, researchers interviewed women 'Wikipedians' to examine the lack of female and non-binary editors in Wikipedia. (2019-06-12)

Hubble measurements suggest disparity in Hubble constant calculations is not a fluke
Hubble's measurements of today's expansion rate do not match the rate that was expected based on how the Universe appeared shortly after the Big Bang over 13 billion years ago. Using new data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have significantly lowered the possibility that this discrepancy is a fluke. (2019-04-25)

Abundance of information narrows our collective attention span
New study in Nature Communications finds increasingly narrow peaks of collective attention over time, supporting a 'social acceleration' occurring across different domains. (2019-04-15)

Dermatology students improve Wikipedia entries on skin disease
A group of medical students recruited to improve Wikipedia articles on skin-related diseases, saw millions more views of those stories following their editing, highlighting the value of expert input on the popular web encyclopedia. (2019-04-03)

Could internet activity provide accurate in plant and animal conservation?
More than a quarter of the species in their dataset showed seasonal interest. For these seasonal species, the researchers found that the timing and amount of internet activity is a highly accurate measure of when and how the species is present. The team thinks it might be possible to measure changes in the presence and abundance of species simply by measuring internet activity. (2019-03-13)

Hubble & Gaia accurately weigh the Milky Way
In a striking example of multi-mission astronomy, measurements from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the ESA Gaia mission have been combined to improve the estimate of the mass of our home galaxy the Milky Way: 1.5 trillion solar masses. (2019-03-07)

Global analysis of billions of Wikipedia searches reveals biodiversity secrets
An international team of researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Birmingham and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have found that the way in which people use the internet is closely tied to patterns and rhythms in the natural world. This finding, publishing March 5 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology suggests new ways to monitor changes in the world's biodiversity. (2019-03-05)

Analysis of billions of Wikipedia searches reveals biodiversity secrets
An international team of researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Birmingham and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have found that the way in which people use the internet is closely tied to patterns and rhythms in the natural world. (2019-03-05)

The medium shapes the message: New communication technologies may bias historical record
The introduction of communication technologies appears to bias historical records in the direction of the content best suited for each technology, according to a study published Feb. 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by C. Jara-Figueroa and colleagues from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA. (2019-02-20)

New university ranking system includes the cultural perspective
A new study proposes a new way of ranking universities, using a more balanced cultural view and based on 24 international editions of Wikipedia. (2019-01-28)

Hubble sees the brightest quasar in the early Universe
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has discovered the brightest quasar ever seen in the early Universe. After 20 years of searching, astronomers have identified the ancient quasar with the help of strong gravitational lensing. This unique object provides an insight into the birth of galaxies when the Universe was less than a billion years old. (2019-01-10)

New attack could make website security captchas obsolete
Researchers have created new artificial intelligence that could spell the end for one of the most widely used website security systems. The new algorithm, based on deep learning methods, is the most effective solver of captcha security and authentication systems to date and is able to defeat versions of text captcha schemes used to defend the majority of the world's most popular websites (2018-12-05)

Why some Wikipedia disputes go unresolved
Study identifies reasons for unsettled editing disagreements and offers predictive tools that could improve deliberation. (2018-11-06)

BUFFALO charges towards the earliest galaxies
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has started a new mission to shed light on the evolution of the earliest galaxies in the Universe. The BUFFALO survey will observe six massive galaxy clusters and their surroundings. The first observations show the galaxy cluster Abell 370 and a host of magnified, gravitationally lensed galaxies around it. (2018-09-13)

Family tree of blood production reveals hundreds of thousands of stem cells
Adult humans have ten times more blood-creating stem cells in their bone marrow than previously thought, ranging between 50,000 and 200,000 stem cells. Researchers developed a new approach for studying stem cells, based on methods used in ecology. The results in Nature present a new opportunity for studying how human stem cells throughout the body change during ageing and disease, and could lead to insights on cancer development and stem cell therapies. (2018-09-05)

Averting toxic chats: Computer model predicts when online conversations turn sour
The internet offers the potential for constructive dialogue and cooperation, but online conversations too often degenerate into personal attacks. In hopes that those attacks can be averted, Cornell University researchers have created a model to predict which civil conversations might take a turn and derail. (2018-07-24)

Decade of research shows little improvement in websites' password guidance
Leading brands including Amazon and Wikipedia are failing to support users with advice on how to securely protect their data, a study shows. (2018-07-17)

Rough terrain? No problem for beaver-inspired autonomous robot
University at Buffalo researchers are using stigmergy, a biological phenomenon that has been used to explain everything from the behavior of termites and beavers to the popularity of Wikipedia, to build new problem-solving autonomous robots. (2018-06-27)

A lonely beauty
Beauty, grace, mystery -- this magnificent spiral galaxy has all the qualities of a perfect galactic Valentine. Captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the galaxy NGC 3344 presents itself face-on, allowing astronomers a detailed look at its intricate and elegant structure. And Hubble's ability to observe objects over a wide range of different wavelengths reveals features that would otherwise remain invisible. (2018-02-14)

North, east, south, west: The many faces of Abell 1758
Resembling a swarm of flickering fireflies, this beautiful galaxy cluster glows intensely in the dark cosmos, accompanied by the myriad bright lights of foreground stars and swirling spiral galaxies. A1758N is a sub-cluster of Abell 1758, a massive cluster containing hundreds of galaxies. Although it may appear serene in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, the sub-cluster actually comprises two even smaller structures currently in the turbulent process of merging. (2018-01-18)

Groundwater and tundra fires may work together to thaw permafrost
Groundwater may play an unrecognized role in thawing Arctic permafrost following wildfires, according to new research. (2017-10-21)

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