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Current Wine News and Events, Wine News Articles.
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What's behind smelly wine
Aging often improves the flavor of wine, but sometimes the beverage emerges from storage with an unpleasant smell. One of the prime culprits is hydrogen sulfide, which can give the affected wine an aroma of sewage or rotten eggs. In a report in ACS' >Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers have now identified some potential sources of this stinky compound. (2018-12-12)

Wild yeasts may hold key to better wines from warmer climates
Researchers at the University of Adelaide have found yeasts that naturally occur on wine grapes may improve wines produced in warmer climates. Up until now the use of these 'natural' or 'wild' yeasts during the production process has mostly been discouraged by wine makers. (2018-12-02)

More than H2O: Technology simultaneously measures 71 elements in water, other liquids
A new method for simultaneous measurement of 71 inorganic elements in liquids -- including water, beverages, and biological fluids -- makes element testing much faster, more efficient, and more comprehensive than was possible in the past. (2018-11-19)

White wine, lemon juice combo prevents unwanted discoloration of pastry dough
No matter if it's grandma's cookies or commercially produced rolls, pastry lovers expect their baked goods to have a certain 'golden brown' allure -- but only after baking. A white dough that changes hue during storage, however, can negatively affect the appearance and perception of the final baked product. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that they have developed a natural way to prevent discoloration during storage. (2018-11-07)

Can chocolate, tea, coffee and zinc help make you more healthy?
Ageing and a low life expectancy are caused, at least partly, by oxidative stress. A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Ivana Ivanovi-Burmazovi from the Chair of Bioinorganic Chemistry at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), together with researchers from the USA, have discovered that zinc can activate an organic molecule, helping to protect against oxidative stress. (2018-11-02)

Just a few drinks can change how memories are formed
Researchers at Brown found that alcohol hijacks a conserved memory pathway in the brain and changes which versions of genes are made, forming the cravings that fuel addiction. (2018-10-25)

Wine's origin might affect acceptable price more than taste study shows
Taste might have less to do with what consumers are willing to pay for wine than you think. In fact, issues like a wine's country and region of origin sometimes had more impact on a person's willingness to pay more for a wine than taste. (2018-10-23)

A rack for ammonia
Handling, storing, and shipping of ammonia requires costly equipment and special precautions because of its inherent corrosiveness and toxicity. Scientists in Manchester, UK, have found that a metal-organic framework, MFM-300(Al), a porous solid, not only effectively filters harmful nitrogen dioxide gas, but it also has outstanding capabilities for ammonia storage. As detailed in the journal Angewandte Chemie, reversible uptake and release of ammonia proceeds by a unique sorption mode. (2018-10-08)

Even light drinking increases risk of death
Analyzing data from more than 400,000 people, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that consuming one to two drinks four or more times per week -- an amount deemed healthy by current guidelines -- increases the risk of premature death by 20 percent. (2018-10-03)

Baltimore liquor stores linked more to violent crime than bars and restaurants
A new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY) found that alcohol outlets in Baltimore that sell alcohol for off-premise consumption (such as liquor stores and beer and wine stores) have a stronger association with incidences of violent crimes, including homicides, aggravated assaults, sexual assaults, and robbery, than alcohol outlets in Baltimore where alcohol is bought and consumed on-site, such as bars and restaurants. (2018-09-26)

Strands of hair from member of Franklin expedition provide new clues into mystery
A new analysis of human hair taken from the remains of one of the members of the Franklin expedition, is providing further evidence that lead poisoning was just one of many different factors contributing to the deaths of the crew, and not the primary cause, casting new doubt on the theory that has been the subject of debate amongst scientists and historians for decades. (2018-09-05)

WSU scientists clone virus to help stop overwhelming grape disease
A new discovery by Washington State University scientists could help grape growers roll back a devastating virus that withers vines and shrivels harvests. (2018-08-30)

Scientists develop alternative treatment for peripheral artery disease
Cristina Sabliov, LSU Biological and Agricultural Engineering professor, and Tammy Dugas, professor in the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine's Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, have joined forces to fight peripheral artery disease, or PAD, an ailment affecting 8 million Americans. (2018-08-28)

Scientists examine the relative impact of proximity to seed sources
A new research study published in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management tackles an important, unresolved question in the biology of invasive plants. Which is most important to the establishment of new invasive communities -- proximity to seed sources, canopy disturbance, or soil disturbance? (2018-08-17)

Unwrapping the brewing secrets of barley
University of Adelaide researchers have uncovered fundamental new information about the malting characteristics of barley grains. They say their finding could pave the way to more stable brewing processes or new malts for craft brewers. (2018-07-23)

Moderate alcohol consumption may boost male fertility
The question of whether alcohol intake affects male reproductive function is controversial. In a new Andrology study, moderate alcohol intake was linked with higher semen volume, sperm concentration, and total sperm count. (2018-07-18)

An orange a day keeps macular degeneration away: 15-year study
A new study has shown that people who regularly eat oranges are less likely to develop macular degeneration than people who do not eat oranges. Researchers at the Westmead Institute for Medical Research interviewed more than 2,000 Australian adults aged over 50 and followed them over a 15-year period. (2018-07-12)

Compounds found in green tea and wine may block formation of toxic metabolites
A new Tel Aviv University study suggests there is hope of treating certain inborn congenital metabolic diseases -- a hope found in green tea and in red wine. (2018-07-02)

Magnetic treatment could help remove 'off-flavor' from wines
From vine to wine, grapes undergo a remarkable transformation. But sometimes this makeover results in vino that doesn't taste quite right. In a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that they have found a way to use tiny magnetic particles to remove off-tasting substances in cabernet sauvignon without altering its desired bouquet. Eventually, they say this technique could help remove unwanted flavors from other wines. (2018-06-13)

Using envy as a marketing tool can backfire
For decades, marketers have used envy to sell, attempting to cash in on consumers' desire to want what others have. But does it actually work? According to a new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business, employing envy can boost brands but it can also completely backfire -- and it depends on a consumer's self-esteem. (2018-06-05)

Serving smaller alcoholic drinks could reduce the UK's alcohol consumption
New research published in Addiction, conducted by researchers from the universities of Liverpool and Sheffield, highlights the potential benefits of reducing the standard serving size of alcoholic beverages. (2018-05-14)

A detective story of wildfires and wine
In this story of wine and smoke taint, everyone knows 'whodunit' -- it's the smoke from wildfires. But it's the 'how' that's got researchers and winemakers stymied. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are making some headway, sifting through complex, and perhaps misleading, clues. (2018-05-09)

Labeling alcoholic drinks as lower in strength could encourage people to drink more
Wines and beers labelled as lower in alcohol strength may increase the total amount of alcoholic drink consumed, according to a study published in the journal Health Psychology. The study was carried out by the Behaviour and Health Research Unit at the University of Cambridge in collaboration with the Centre for Addictive Behaviours Research at London South Bank University. (2018-04-25)

Could eating moss be good for your gut?
An international team of scientists including the University of Adelaide has discovered a new complex carbohydrate in moss that could possibly be exploited for health or other uses. (2018-04-23)

The hidden health cost of that extra drink
Regularly drinking more than the recommended UK guidelines for alcohol could take years off your life, according to new research published today in the Lancet. Part-funded by the British Heart Foundation, the study shows that drinking more alcohol is associated with a higher risk of stroke, fatal aneurysm, heart failure and death. (2018-04-12)

400-year-old documents reveal evidence of Japanese opium production and winemaking
In 2016, Kumamoto University researchers reported that a Kyusyu lord ordered his people to produce wine in the 17th century. Further research has revealed that he also ordered the production of opium. It is thought that wine was used as gifts and medicine, and opium for medicine. The documents reveal that while the Japanese government was considering a ban on Christianity, the Hosokawa family seems to have actively imported goods, such as wine, from Portugal. (2018-04-02)

Researchers use light to turn yeast into biochemical factories
Researchers have used a combination of light and genetic engineering to controlling the metabolism, or basic chemical process, of a living cell. Building on techniques that already have transformed the field of neuroscience, the researchers used light to control genetically-modified yeast and increase its output of commercially valuable chemicals. (2018-03-22)

From landfill to lipstick: Grape waste as a cosmetic and food ingredient
The world drinks a lot of wine, and that means a lot of grapes are consumed. But not every part of the grape ends up in the bottle. Seeds, stalks and skins end up in landfills. Now, researchers say they have found useful commercial applications, such as prolonging the shelf life of fatty foods, for these wine leftovers. The researchers present their work at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-19)

So much depends on the velocity of tiny droplets cast upward
New research describes the velocity of aerosols cast upward as bubbles on a liquid's surface burst. Above the ocean, these droplets transfer moisture, salt, and even toxins such as algae from water to air. Knowing the speed and height of aerosols applies to numerous areas of scientific and economic interest, including more accurate climate modeling or creating a perfect glass of champagne. (2018-03-08)

Discovery shows wine grapes gasping for breath
University of Adelaide researchers have discovered how grapes 'breathe', and that shortage of oxygen leads to cell death in the grape. (2018-03-01)

Wine polyphenols could fend off bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease
Sipping wine is good for your colon and heart, possibly because of the beverage's abundant and structurally diverse polyphenols. Now researchers report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that wine polyphenols might also be good for your oral health. (2018-02-21)

Problems with herbicide-resistant weeds become crystal clear
Herbicide-resistant weeds are threatening food security, but University of Queensland researchers are one step closer to a solution after a new discovery. A UQ School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences study led by Associate Professor Luke Guddat uncovered how penoxsulam, the active ingredient in the world's largest-selling rice herbicide, works. (2018-02-13)

New controls scale quantum chips
A fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is 'qubit interference.' In new research published in Science Advances magazine, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference. (2018-02-02)

Red wine proves good for the heart (again)
Antioxidant compounds found in red wine are advancing the treatment of heart disease -- the leading cause of death for both men and women in the US Researchers have developed drug-eluting stents with red wine antioxidants. (2018-02-01)

Sugar tax on soft drinks might drive up alcohol consumption
A sugar tax levied on soft drinks might have the unintended consequence of driving up alcohol consumption, but the picture is mixed, finds research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2018-01-23)

A superficial relationship: Soap on water
New research shows with unprecedented accuracy what happens to soap as it spreads on water. (2018-01-23)

A changing climate, changing wine
A new Harvard study suggests that, though vineyards might be able to counteract some of the effects of climate change by planting lesser-known grape varieties, scientists and vintners need to better understand the wide diversity of grapes and their adaptions to different climates. (2018-01-02)

Alcohol taxes are too low, have not kept up with inflation
State alcohol excise taxes are typically only a few cents per drink and have not kept pace with inflation, according to a new study in the January issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. Raising those taxes, according to the authors, represents an opportunity for states to increase revenues while simultaneously improving public health outcomes and costs related to excessive alcohol consumption. (2017-12-13)

Mistletoe and (a large) wine: Seven-fold increase in wine glass size over 300 years
Our Georgian and Victorian ancestors probably celebrated Christmas with more modest wine consumption than we do today -- if the size of their wine glasses are anything to go by. Researchers at the University of Cambridge have found that the capacity of wine glasses has increased seven-fold over the past 300 years, and most steeply in the last two decades as wine consumption rose. (2017-12-13)

Pop the bubbly and hear the quality
The classic sparkling wine that has rung in countless new years with a bang may have more to its bubbles. Champagne is notable for its iconic cork popping, but the bubble acoustics also play a key role in determining how expensive that bottle should be. Investigators from the University of Texas at Austin, will be presenting their research the acoustical measurements of champagne bubbles during the 174th ASA Meeting, Dec. 4-8, 2017, in New Orleans. (2017-12-05)

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