Current Working Memory News and Events

Current Working Memory News and Events, Working Memory News Articles.
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Immune-compromised people with HIV, APOE4 gene may have a compounded risk for Alzheimer's
People living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have a history of severe immunosuppression and at least one copy of the Alzheimer's disease-related gene variant APOE4, might see a compounded adverse effect on the circuitry that impacts memory. This could eventually lead to an increased risk for dementia after age 65, according to Georgetown University Medical Center investigators and colleagues. (2021-02-22)

Sleep is vital to associating emotion with memory, according to U-M study
When you slip into sleep, it's easy to imagine that your brain shuts down, but University of Michigan research suggests that groups of neurons activated during prior learning keep humming, tattooing memories into your brain. (2021-02-22)

Distorting memories helps the brain remember
In order to remember similar events, the brain exaggerates the difference between them. This results in divergent brain activity patterns but better memory performance, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2021-02-22)

Study finds real-time dialogue with a dreaming person is possible
Dreams take us to what feels like a different reality. They also happen while we're fast asleep. So, you might not expect that a person in the midst of a vivid dream would be able to perceive questions and provide answers to them. But a new study reported in the journal Current Biology on February 18 shows that, in fact, they can. (2021-02-18)

SuperAger brains resist protein tangles that lead to Alzheimer's
A new study showed cognitive SuperAgers have resistance to the development of fibrous tangles in a brain region related to memory and which are known to be markers of Alzheimer's disease. Their resistance appears to help protect their memory. (2021-02-17)

Experimental demonstration of measurement-dependent realities possible, researcher says
Holger F. Hofmann, professor in the Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Hiroshima University, published a method to experimentally demonstrate the precision of quantum measurements on Feb. 3 in Physical Review Research. His work has implications for our fundamental understanding of physics at the level of individual quantum objects. (2021-02-16)

How comparable different stress tests are
Scientists use many different tests to investigate what happens in the brain in people experiencing stress. It is unclear to what extent the various methods with which subjects are placed under stress are comparable to each other. In a meta-analysis, researchers compared 31 previous studies that had investigated stress using functional magnetic resonance imaging. The team worked out which regions of the brain are activated as standard during stress and which stress tests trigger similar activation patterns. (2021-02-12)

Compounds from apples may boost brain function
Natural compounds found in apples and other fruits may help stimulate the production of new brain cells, which may have implications for learning and memory, according to a new study in mice published in Stem Cell Reports. (2021-02-11)

Mediterranean-style diet linked to better thinking skills in later life
People who eat a Mediterranean-style diet--particularly one rich in green leafy vegetables and low in meat--are more likely to stay mentally sharp in later life, a study shows. Closely adhering to a Mediterranean diet was associated with higher scores on a range of memory and thinking tests among adults in their late 70s, the research found. The study found no link, however, between the Mediterranean-style diet and better brain health. (2021-02-10)

As you look around, mental images bounce between right and left brain
A new study in Neuron explains how the brain helps us remember what we've seen, even as it shifts around in our visual system. That ability--to remember that something is the same thing no matter how it's moving around relative to our eyes--is what gives us the freedom to control where we look. (2021-02-08)

Research establishes a new method to predict individual risk of cognitive decline
This work shows that direct measures of brain signatures during mental activity are more sensitive and accurate predictors of memory decline than current standard behavioral testing. (2021-02-05)

RUDN University mathematicians reduced neural network size six times without post-training
A team of mathematicians from RUDN University found a way to reduce the size of a trained neural network six times without spending additional resources on re-training it. The approach is based on finding a correlation between the weights of neural connections in the initial system and its simplified version. (2021-02-05)

Center for BrainHealth researchers create virtual reality cognitive assessment
Virtual reality isn't just for gaming. Researchers can use virtual reality, or VR, to assess participants' attention, memory and problem-solving abilities in real world settings. By using VR technology to examine how folks complete daily tasks, like making a grocery list, researchers can better help clinical populations that struggle with executive functioning to manage their everyday lives. (2021-02-05)

Researchers from NUS create 'whirling' nano-structures in anti-ferromagnets
Inspired by the Big Bang cooling, the new finding could lead to super-fast, energy-efficient memory chips. (2021-02-04)

'Where did I park my car?' Brain stimulation improves mental time travel
A new Northwestern Medicine study improved memory of complex, realistic events similar to these by applying transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the brain network responsible for memory. The authors then had participants watch videos of realistic activities to measure how memory works during everyday tasks. The findings prove it is possible to measure and manipulate realistic types of memory. (2021-02-04)

How does pain experienced in everyday life impact memory?
A new study conducted out of the University of Miami indicates that brain systems related to emotional distress could underlie the negative impacts of pain on memory in healthy individuals. (2021-02-03)

Scientists find promising avenue to restore cognitive function impaired by Alzheimer's disease
A team of neuroscientists has identified a potential means to address the loss of cognitive function due to Alzheimer's disease by targeting protein synthesis in mice. Their findings reveal that synthetic pharmaceuticals could rescue the activity of brain cells needed for memory formation. (2021-02-02)

New research investigates relationship between health literacy and self-care
It is important for patients to understand the necessary information for making health decisions, yet studies have shown that a large segment of the population lacks the health literacy to do so. Jessie Chin, School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and colleagues have investigated the relationship between health literacy and ''actionable memory,'' or memory for medication purposes, among diabetic patients. They report their results in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2021-02-02)

Why do psychiatric drugs help some, but not others? Study offers clues
New University of Colorado Boulder research shows that a key protein in the brain called AKT may function differently in males than females. The study also offers a closer look at where, precisely, in the brain things may go wrong with it, marking an important step toward more targeted and less harmful therapies. (2021-02-01)

Increasing snow depth prevented wintertime soils from cooling during the warming hiatus
Scientists investigated snow cover along with other direct and indirect soil temperature influences in northeastern China. The research further showed that the increasing snow depth in northeastern China may be the main reason for the continued warming trend in soil temperatures. In addition to the thermal insulation effect of snow cover, the ability for soil to record human changes and environmental influences, or ''soil memory'' is also important, especially at greater depths. (2021-01-31)

New study investigates photonics for artificial intelligence and neuromorphic computing
Scientists have given a fascinating new insight into the next steps to develop fast, energy-efficient, future computing systems that use light instead of electrons to process and store information - incorporating hardware inspired directly by the functioning of the human brain. (2021-01-29)

Working memory can help tailor educational development
Imagine a 7-year-old and a college student both take a break from their virtual classes to get a drink of water. When they return, the 7-year-old has difficulty restarting the assignment, while the college student resumes working as if the break never occurred. Nelson Cowan, an expert in working memory at the University of Missouri, believes understanding this developmental age difference can help younger children better adjust to a virtual learning environment during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-01-27)

At three days old, newborn mice remember their moms
For mice, the earliest social memories can form at three days old and last into adulthood, scientists report on January 26 in the journal Cell Reports. They show that mouse pups prefer their mothers to unfamiliar mouse mothers as newborns and remember them after up to 100 days apart--although they prefer unfamiliar mouse mothers as adults. (2021-01-26)

Stimulating brain pathways shows origins of human language and memory
Scientists have identified that the evolutionary development of human and primate brains may have been similar for communication and memory. (2021-01-25)

SUTD research team extends 4D printing to nanophotonics
The newly developed shape memory polymer resist which allows for high-resolution 4D printing, promises a platform for information hiding for optical anti-counterfeiting and tunable photonic devices. (2021-01-22)

Memory fail controlled by dopamine circuit, study finds
Distraction can make you momentarily forget things. But how? Davis lab at Scripps Research, Florida uncovers a mechanism in fruit flies. (2021-01-21)

A new study shows the relationship between surgery and Alzheimer's disease
Amsterdam, January 21, 2021 - A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease carried out by researchers at the Marqués de Valdecilla-IDIVAL University Hospital, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Bonn Medical Center, proposes that major surgery is a promoter or accelerator of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The first author of the publication was Carmen Lage and the principal investigator Pascual Sánchez-Juan. (2021-01-21)

A closer look at T cells reveals big differences in mild vs. severe COVID-19 cases
A big question on people's minds these days: how long does immunity to SARS-CoV-2 last following infection? Now a research team from La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI), The University of Liverpool and the University of Southampton has uncovered an interesting clue. Their new study suggests that people with severe COVID-19 cases may be left with more of the protective 'memory' T cells needed to fight reinfection. (2021-01-21)

Abnormal hyperactivation in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer's
A research team led by UdeM psychology and neuroscience professor Sylvie Belleville has just targeted an early biomarker of the disease. (2021-01-21)

Two-photon polymerization of PEGda hydrogel microstructure with low threshold power with green laser
The fabrication of shape-memory hydrogel scaffolds not only requires biocompatibility, micrometre resolution, high mechanical strength, but also requires a low polymerisation threshold in high-water content environment to incorporate microstructures with biological tissues. Towards this goal, scientists from China and australite developed a new hydrogel formula that full fills this goal and demonstrated water-responsive structures with a shape-memory effect at a micrometre scale. This work is of importance for the development future reversible microdevices in biomedical engineering. (2021-01-20)

Researchers improve data readout by using 'quantum entanglement'
Researchers say they have been able to greatly improve the readout of data from digital memories - thanks to a phenomenon known as 'quantum entanglement'. (2021-01-20)

The immune system mounts a lasting defense after recovery from COVID-19
The study participants continued to improve their antibodies months after initial infection, potentially due to exposure to remnants of the virus hidden in the gut. (2021-01-20)

Prenatal BPA exposure may contribute to the male bias of autism spectrum disorder
Autism has a higher prevalence in males than females. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a common chemical found in plastics, our food, and even the human placenta. Higher prenatal exposure to BPA is thought to increase the risk of autism. Researchers have, for the first time, identified autism candidate genes that may be responsible for the sex-specific effects of BPA. (2021-01-19)

The brain region responsible for self-bias in memory
A brain region involved in processing information about ourselves biases our ability to remember, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2021-01-18)

CMOS-compatible 3D ferroelectric memory with ultralow power and high speed
POSTECH Professor Jang-Sik Lee's research team develops ferroelectric NAND flash memory. (2021-01-18)

Artificial Intelligence beats us in chess, but not in memory
A new piece of research shows that the brain strategy for storing memories may lead to imperfect memories, but in turn, allows it to store more memories, and with less hassle than AI. The new study, carried out by SISSA scientists in collaboration with Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience & Centre for Neural Computation, Trondheim, Norway, has just been published in Physical Review Letters. (2021-01-15)

Can menopause be blamed for increased forgetfulness and lack of attention?
If you're a bit more forgetful or having more difficulty processing complex concepts than in the past, the problem may be your menopause stage. A new study claims that menopause stage is a key determinant of cognition and, contrary to previous studies, shows that certain cognitive declines may continue into the postmenopause period. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-01-13)

The changing paradigm of next-generation semiconductor memory development
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) has announced that the research team led by Dr. Kim Kyoung-Whan at the Center for Spintronics has proposed a new principle about spin memory devices, which are next-generation memory devices. This breakthrough presents new applicability that is different from the existing paradigm. (2021-01-12)

Team creates hybrid chips with processors and memory to run AI on battery-powered devices
Transactions between processors and memory can consume 95 percent of the energy needed to do machine learning and AI, which severely limits battery life. A team led by Stanford engineers has designed a system that can run AI tasks faster, and with less energy, by harnessing eight hybrid chips, each with its own data processor built right next to its own memory storage. (2021-01-11)

Neuroscientists identify brain circuit that encodes timing of events
MIT neuroscientists shed new light on how the timing of a memory is encoded in the hippocampus, and suggest that time and space are encoded separately. (2021-01-11)

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