Current World Record News and Events

Current World Record News and Events, World Record News Articles.
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Giant predatory worms roamed the seafloor until 5.3 million years ago
An international study in which the University of Granada participated--recently published in the journal Scientific Reports--has identified a new fossil record of these mysterious animals in the northeast of Taiwan (China), in marine sediments from the Miocene Age (between 23 and 5.3 million years ago). These organisms, similar to today's Bobbit worm (Eunice aphroditois), were approximately 2 m long and 3 cm in diameter and lived in burrows. (2021-02-18)

Magnetic reversal 42,000 years ago triggered global environmental change
Nearly 42,000 years ago, when Earth's magnetic fields reversed, this triggered major environmental changes, extinction events, and long-term changes in human behavior, a new study reports. (2021-02-18)

Record sunshine during first COVID-19 lockdown largely caused by unusual weather
Exceptional weather conditions were mainly responsible for high solar radiation, not the aerosol reduction due to the shutdown of industry and reduced traffic in the first lockdown / International research team continues to develop climate simulations that take into account influences of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-02-16)

First humans in Tasmania must have seen spectacular auroras
A small sub-alpine lake in western Tasmania has helped establish that 41,000 years ago Australia experienced the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion and that Tasmanian, Aboriginals, would've seen it. (2021-02-15)

The politics of synonyms
A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found people are more successful at identifying language associated with Republican speech than Democratic speech patterns. The results are available in the February issue of the journal PLOS. (2021-02-11)

Forests of the world in 3D
Primeval forests are of great importance for biodiversity and global carbon and water cycling. The three-dimensional structure of forests plays an important role because it influences processes of gas and energy exchange with the atmosphere, and provides habitats for numerous species. An international research team led by Göttingen University investigated the variety of different complex structures found in the world's forests, and the factors that explain this diversity. Results were published in Nature Communications. (2021-02-05)

New study unravels Darwin's 'abominable mystery' surrounding origin of flowering plants
The origin of flowering plants famously puzzled Charles Darwin, who described their sudden appearance in the fossil record from relatively recent geological times as an 'abominable mystery'. (2021-01-28)

Record-breaking laser link could help us test whether Einstein was right
Scientists from Australia have set a world record for the most stable transmission of a laser signal through the atmosphere. The team combined Aussie 'phase stabilisation' technology with advanced self-guiding optical terminals to 'effectively eliminate atmospheric turbulence,' an advance which could help test Einstein's theory of general relativity. (2021-01-22)

Accounting for the gaps in ancient food webs
Studying ancient food webs can help scientists reconstruct communities of species, many long extinct, and even use those insights to figure out how modern-day communities might change in the future. There's just one problem: only some species left enough of a trace for scientists to find eons later, leaving large gaps in the fossil record -- and researchers' ability to piece together the food webs from the past. (2021-01-14)

600-year-old marine sponge holds centuries-old climate records
Scientists used a 600-year-old marine sponge to reconstruct a record of ocean temperature in the North Atlantic revealing past volcanic activity as well as the current global warming trend from the release of carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses into Earth's atmosphere and absorbed by the oceans. (2021-01-13)

Israel can expect a major earthquake of 6.5 on the Richter scale in the coming years
The researchers warn: In the coming years, it is likely that a devastating earthquake will hit, causing hundreds of deaths. (2021-01-06)

Record-setting thermoelectric figure of merit achieved for metal oxides
Scientists at Hokkaido University have developed a layered cobalt oxide with a record-setting thermoelectric figure of merit, which can be used to enhance thermoelectric power generation. (2020-12-22)

World's first transmission of 1 Petabit/s using a single-core multimode optical fiber
A group of researchers from the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) and NOKIA Bell Labs (USA) and Prysimian Group (France) succeeded in the world's first transmission exceeding 1 petabit per second in a single-core multi-mode optical fiber. This increases the current record transmission in a multi-mode fiber by a factor of 2.5. The wideband optical transmission was enabled by mode multiplexers and a transmission fiber optimized for high optical bandwidth. (2020-12-18)

Record resolution in X-ray microscopy
Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland and other institutions in Paris, Hamburg and Basel, have succeeded in setting a new record in X-ray microscopy. With improved diffractive lenses and more precise sample positioning, they were able to achieve spatial resolution in the single-digit nanometre scale. (2020-12-11)

Perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells on the magic threshold of 30% efficiency
An HZB team has published a report in the journal Science on the development of its current world record of 29.15% efficiency for a tandem solar cell made of perovskite and silicon. The tandem cell provided stable performance for 300 hours - even without encapsulation. To accomplish this, the group headed by Prof. Steve Albrecht investigated physical processes at the interfaces to improve the transport of the charge carriers. (2020-12-10)

Tree rings capture an abrupt irreversible shift in east Asia's climate
The abrupt shift to hotter and drier conditions over inner East Asia is unprecedented and may herald an irreversible shift to a new climate regime for the region, according to a new study. (2020-11-26)

Study evaluates new World Health Organization Labor Care Guide for maternity care providers
The World Health Organization developed the new Labor Care Guide to support clinicians in providing good quality, women-centered care during labor and childbirth. In a study published in Birth, researchers evaluated the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of the new Labor Care Guide for maternity care providers in six countries. (2020-11-20)

Teton range glacial ice may have persisted in a dormant state during early Holocene warming
A continuous 10,000-year record of alpine glacier fluctuations in Wyoming's Teton Range suggests that some glacial ice in the western US persisted in a reduced, essentially dormant state during periods of early Holocene warming. The findings challenge the paradigm that all Rocky Mountain glaciers completely disappeared during these warm, dry conditions, instead. (2020-11-18)

New black hole merger simulations could help power next-gen gravitational wave detectors
Rochester Institute of Technology scientists have developed new simulations of black holes with widely varying masses merging that could help power the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. RIT Professor Carlos Lousto and Research Associate James Healy from RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences outline these record-breaking simulations in a new Physical Review Letters paper. (2020-11-09)

UM researcher proposes sea-level rise global observing system
University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researcher Shane Elipot proposes a new approach to monitoring global sea-level rise. Using the existing NOAA Global Drifter Program array of roughly 1,200 buoys that drift freely with ocean currents, Elipot suggests adding additional instruments to record their height, or the ''level of the sea'' they ride on, to collect long-term data on the average sea levels across the world's oceans. (2020-10-26)

Super-resolution microscopy and machine learning shed new light on fossil pollen grains
Plant biology researchers at the University of Illinois and computer scientists at the University of California Irvine have developed a new method of fossil pollen identification through the combination of super-resolution microscopy and machine learning. The team developed and trained three convolutional neural network models to identify fossil pollen specimens from an unknown group of legumes. (2020-10-23)

What was responsible for the hottest spring in eastern China in 2018?
Quantitative estimates of the probability ratio show that anthropogenic forcing may have increased the chance of this event by ten-fold, while the anomalous circulation increased it by approximately two-fold. (2020-10-15)

Recent Atlantic ocean warming unprecedented in nearly 3,000 years
Sediments from a lake in the Canadian High Arctic allow climate scientists to extend the record of Atlantic sea-surface temperature from about 100 to 2,900 years. It shows that the warmest interval over this period has been the past 10 years. A team led by Francois Lapointe and Raymond Bradley in the Climate System Research Center at UMass Amherst analyzed ''perfectly preserved'' annual layers of sediment that accumulated in the lake on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut Territory. (2020-10-14)

Climate change responsible for record sea temperature levels, says study
Global warming is driving an unprecedented rise in sea temperatures including in the Mediterranean, according to a major new report published by the peer-reviewed Journal of Operational Oceanography. (2020-10-02)

Carbon-carbon covalent bonds far more flexible than presumed
A Hokkaido University research group has successfully demonstrated that carbon-carbon (C-C) covalent bonds expand and contract flexibly in response to light and heat. This unexpected flexibility of C-C bonds could confer new properties to organic compounds. (2020-10-01)

New funerary and ritual behaviors of the Neolithic Iberian populations discovered
This finding opens new lines of research and anthropological scenarios, where human and animal sacrifice may have been related to ancestral cults, propitiatory rituals and divine prayers in commemorative festivities (2020-09-25)

2020 Arctic sea ice minimum at second lowest on record
NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder shows that the 2020 minimum extent, which was likely reached on Sept. 15, 2020 measured 1.44 million square miles (3.74 million square kilometers). (2020-09-21)

High-fidelity record of Earth's climate history puts current changes in context
For the first time, climate scientists have compiled a continuous, high-fidelity record of variations in Earth's climate extending 66 million years into the past. The record reveals four distinctive climate states, which the researchers dubbed Hothouse, Warmhouse, Coolhouse, and Icehouse. These major climate states persisted for millions and sometimes tens of millions of years, and within each one the climate shows rhythmic variations corresponding to changes in Earth's orbit around the sun (2020-09-10)

Climate changed in steps in the past
An international study published in Science significantly improves the potential for understanding how the Earth's climate system evolved over the past 66 million years. The work reveals that the Earth system shifted abruptly between 4 distinct modes: hothouse, warmhouse, coolhouse, and icehouse during the period. The EU Horizon 2020 TiPES project contributed to the results. (2020-09-10)

NASA-NOAA satellite tracking record-breaking Tropical Storm Paulette
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Storm Paulette as it tracked through the Central North Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 8, 2020. Paulette, like some other tropical storms this year, has broken a season record. (2020-09-08)

New species of freshwater Crustacea found in the hottest place on earth
A new species of freshwater Crustacea has been discovered during an expedition of the desert Lut, known as the hottest place on Earth. (2020-09-03)

Fossil trees on Peru's Central Andean Plateau tell a tale of dramatic environmental change
The anatomy of plant fossils including an enormous tree that grew 10 million years ago in the now arid, high-elevation Central Andean Plateau calls current paleoclimate models into question, suggesting that the area was more humid than models predict. (2020-08-28)

Greenland ice sheet shows losses in 2019
The Greenland Ice Sheet recorded a new record loss of mass in 2019. This was the finding of a team of international researchers after evaluating data from satellite observations and modelling data. (2020-08-20)

Pulse-like jumps in atmospheric carbon dioxide occurred in glacial and early interglacial periods
Once only associated with colder climate conditions of the last glacial period, a new study finds that rapid, pulse-like increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) also occurred during earlier, warmer interglacial periods. (2020-08-20)

Ancient mountains recorded in Antarctic sandstones reveal potential links to global events
A new analysis of sandstones from Antarctica indicates there may be important links between the generation of mountain belts and major transitions in Earth's atmosphere and oceans. A team of researchers analyzed the chemistry of tiny zircon grains commonly found in the Earth's continental rock record to determine their ages and chemical compositions. The study was published recently in the international peer-reviewed journal Terra Nova. (2020-08-04)

Arizona rock core sheds light on triassic dark ages
A rock core from Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona, has given scientists a powerful new tool to understand how catastrophic events shaped Earth's ecosystems before the rise of the dinosaurs. The core offers scientists a foundation to explain the changes in the fossil record and determine how these events may have shaped life on Earth. (2020-07-20)

Decision support system within the EHR system can increase provider awareness of CKD
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects approximately 37 million U.S. adults and less than 25% are aware of their disease. CKD is readily identified with simple blood and urine tests that are often in a patient's health record yet providers usually do not diagnose the CKD and inform the patient. This study demonstrates that implementation of a decision support system within the electronic health records system can increase provider awareness of CKD. (2020-07-16)

Merging solar cell and liquid battery produces long-lasting solar storage
Combining liquid chemical battery technology with perovskite solar cells has led to a new record in solar energy conversion within a single device. Scientists hope this could open a new way to build home solar energy systems. (2020-07-13)

Famous 'Jurassic Park' dinosaur is less lizard, more bird
From movies to museum exhibits, the dinosaur Dilophosaurus is no stranger to pop culture. Many probably remember it best from the movie 'Jurassic Park,' where it's depicted as a venom-spitting beast with a rattling frill around its neck and two paddle-like crests on its head. But a new comprehensive analysis of Dilophosaurus fossils is helping to set the record straight, finding that the Dilophosaurus was actually the largest land animal of its time. (2020-07-07)

World's fastest Bose-Einstein condensate
New research published in Nature Communications can make elusive state of matter in record time (2020-06-22)

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