Current World Trade Center News and Events

Current World Trade Center News and Events, World Trade Center News Articles.
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City, University of London academic tracks COVID-19 dark web marketplaces
New research carried out by Dr Andrea Baronchelli and his colleagues into the dark web marketplace (DWM) trade in products related to COVID-19, has revealed the need for the continuous monitoring of dark web marketplaces (DWMs), especially in light of the current shortage and availability of coronavirus vaccines. (2021-02-04)

City, University of London academic tracks COVID-19 dark web marketplace before vaccine
Dr Andrea Baronchelli, and colleagues have carried out insightful research into the dark web marketplace (DWM) trade in products related to COVID-19; they have revealed the need for the continuous monitoring of dark web marketplaces (DWMs) especially in light of the current shortage and availability of coronavirus vaccines. (2021-02-04)

Food export restrictions by a few countries could skyrocket global food crop prices
Recent events such as the Covid-19 pandemic, locust infestations, drought and labour shortages have disrupted food supply chains, endangering food security in the process. A recent study published in Nature Food shows that trade restrictions and stockpiling of supplies by a few key countries could create global food price spikes and severe local food shortages during times of threat. (2021-01-28)

Southern Africa's most endangered shark just extended its range by 2,000 kilometers
A team of marine scientists led by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) has confirmed that southern Africa's most threatened endemic shark - the Critically Endangered shorttail nurse shark (Pseudoginglymostoma brevicaudatum) - has been found to occur in Mozambique; a finding that represents a range extension of more than 2,000 kilometers (1,242 miles). (2021-01-26)

Burial practices point to an interconnected early Medieval Europe
Changes in Western European burial practices spread rapidly during the 6th - 8th centuries AD, providing strong evidence that early Medieval Europe was a well-connected place with a shared culture. (2021-01-21)

Shedding light on the secret reproductive lives of honey bees
Research at NC State and the University of British Columbia shows that there are trade-offs between sperm viability and the expression of a protein involved in the insect's immune response. (2021-01-13)

Seafood strategies
The ''Executive Order on Promoting American Seafood Competitiveness and Economic Growth,'' issued by the Trump administration in May 2020, lays out a plan to expand the U.S. seafood industry, especially aquaculture, and enhance American seafood competitiveness in the global market. (2021-01-07)

Protecting the global food supply chain
The University of Delaware's Kyle Davis led a collaborative effort to research how to protect food chains from environmental shocks--everything from floods, droughts, and extreme heat to other phenomena like natural hazards, pests, disease, algal blooms, and coral bleaching. (2021-01-05)

Scientists reach limit of multi-parameter quantum measurement with zero trade-off
Real-life applications like magnetometry or quantum gyroscope typically involve precise measurement on multiple parameters. How to achieve the ultimate precision limits simultaneously is a long sought-after grail in the field. (2021-01-04)

Elephant ivory continues to be disguised and sold on eBay
Research from the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found that elephant ivory is still being sold on the online marketplace eBay, despite its 10-year-old policy banning the trade in ivory. (2021-01-04)

Trade in wild animals is thriving online, despite risk of disease transmission
Despite COVID-19 restrictions and the risk of animal to human disease transmission, illegal wildlife trade on social media networks has continued, with wild animals sometimes sold as 'lockdown pets'. (2020-12-22)

Mummified baboons shine new light on the lost land of Punt
Ancient Punt was a major trading partner of Egyptians for at least 1,100 years. It was an important source of luxury goods, including incense, gold, and living baboons. Located somewhere in the southern Red Sea region in either Africa or Arabia, scholars have debated its geographic location for more than 150 years. A new Dartmouth-led study tracing the geographic origins of Egyptian mummified baboons provides new insight into Punt's location, demonstrating the tremendous nautical range of early Egyptian seafarers. (2020-12-15)

Benefits of renewable energy vary from place to place
A new study finds the environmental benefits of renewable power generation vary significantly, depending on the nature of the conventional power generation that the renewable energy is offsetting. The researchers hope the work will help target future renewable energy investments in places where they can do the most good. (2020-12-14)

Temporal crop diversity stabilizes agricultural production
Securing food supplies around the globe is a challenge facing humanity, especially in light of the predicted increase in the world's population and the effects of climate change. Greater crop diversity in agriculture is seen as a stabilising factor for food security. Yet crop diversity alone is not sufficient. In an article for Nature, a team of researchers coordinated by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) argue that it is also essential that crops differ in their temporal production patterns. (2020-12-09)

Silky sharks find hope in Atlantic, remain targets in Indo-Pacific
Florida International University research shows that conservation efforts in the Atlantic Ocean may be working for one of the most popular -- and endangered -- species that ends up in the global shark fin trade. (2020-12-09)

JNIS™: cuts in Medicare payments jeopardize patient access to care
The final 2021 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (MPFS) issued this week by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will result in reimbursement cuts in the range of 10% for neurointerventional procedures, according to a detailed analysis published last week in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery™, the leading international peer-reviewed journal for the clinical field of neurointerventional surgery. Practitioners warn that this measure will jeopardize access to lifesaving care for individuals experiencing strokes, aneurysms and other deadly conditions. (2020-12-03)

Videoscope analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton reveals detailed dental information
Videoscope analysis of a well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton from Altamura, Italy reveals detailed dental information, including tooth wear and tooth loss. (2020-12-02)

African trade routes sketched out by mediaeval beads
The chemical composition of glass beads and their morphological characteristics can reveal where they come from. Archaeologists from the University of Geneva analyzed glass beads found at rural sites in Mali and Senegal from between the 7th and 13th centuries AD. The scientists demonstrate that the glass they are made of probably came from Egypt, the Levantine coast and the Middle East. The results show that international trade linking Africa to Europe and Asia during was connected with local and regional trade. (2020-12-02)

A long distance connection: polar climate affects trade wind strength in tropics
The impact of sea surface temperature variations in the tropical Pacific on global climate has long been recognized. For instance, the episodic warming of the tropical Pacific during El Niño events causes melt of sea ice in far-reaching parts of the Southern Ocean via its effect on the global atmospheric circulation. A new study, published this week in the journal Science Advances by an international team, demonstrates that the opposite pathway exists as well. (2020-11-20)

COVID-19 highlights risks of wildlife trade
Many diseases, such as COVID-19, made the jump from animals to people with serious consequences for the human host. International researchers, including Göttingen University, say that more epidemics resulting from animal hosts are inevitable unless urgent action is taken. To protect against future pandemics, they call for governments to establish effective legislation addressing wildlife trade, protection of habitats and reduction of interaction between people, wildlife and livestock. Their review appeared in Trends in Ecology & Evolution. (2020-11-17)

Research finds that UK consumers dislike hormones in beef and chlorine washed chicken
New reveals the extent to which UK consumers dislike food produced using production methods such as hormones in beef and chlorine washed chicken. The research also reveals that UK consumers highly value food production that adheres to food safety standards set by the EU as well as UK produced food. This is particularly relevant for post-Brexit trade deals and the ongoing debates about UK food standards. (2020-11-12)

Making a case for organic Rankine cycles in waste heat recovery
In a recent research paper, published in the Energy journal, City, University of London's Dr Martin White says cascaded organic Rankine cycle systems could improve the way in which environmentally-friendly power is generated from waste heat. (2020-11-11)

Evolution favours new diseases of 'intermediate' severity
New epidemic diseases have an evolutionary advantage if they are of ''intermediate'' severity, research shows. (2020-11-11)

Formal community forest management policies often lead to reduced access, resource rights
The most comprehensive global analysis of community forestry ever undertaken shows that government policies formalizing local residents' land access and resource rights often backfire by resulting in less access and weakened rights. (2020-11-09)

One third of UK fruit and vegetables are imported from climate-vulnerable countries
One third of UK fruit and vegetables are imported from climate-vulnerable countries - and this is on the rise. Researchers call for a radical rethink of our trade strategies to ensure people in the UK have continued access to fruit and vegetables. (2020-11-09)

Global analysis of forest management shows local communities often lose out
Maintaining forest cover is an important natural climate solution, but new research shows that too often, communities lose out when local forest management is formalised. The new study published today in Nature Sustainability, led by Dr Johan Oldepkop at The University of Manchester and Reem Hajjar at Oregon State University, is based on 643 case studies of community forest management (CFM) in 51 different countries, from 267 peer-reviewed studies. (2020-11-09)

Escaping the 'Era of Pandemics': experts warn worse crises to come; offer options to reduce risk
Future pandemics will emerge more often, spread more rapidly, do more damage to the world economy and kill more people than COVID-19 unless there is a transformative change in the global approach to dealing with infectious diseases, warns a major new IPBES report on biodiversity and pandemics by 22 leading experts from around the world. (2020-10-29)

Bound for the EU, American-made biomass checks the right boxes
A first-of-its-kind study published in the journal Scientific Reports finds that wood produced in the southeastern United States for the EU's renewable energy needs has a net positive effect on US forests--but that future industry expansion could warrant more research. (2020-10-29)

JNIS: brain-computer allows patients with severe paralysis to text, email, bank
Researchers demonstrated the success of a fully implantable wireless medical device, the Stentrode™ brain-computer interface (BCI), designed to allow patients with severe paralysis to resume daily tasks -- including texting, emailing, shopping and banking online -- without the need for open brain surgery. The first-in-human study was published in the (i>Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery™, the leading international peer-reviewed journal for the clinical field of neurointerventional surgery. (2020-10-28)

Small brain device proves big game changer for severely paralysed patients
A tiny device the size of a small paperclip has been shown to help patients with upper limb paralysis to text, email and even shop online in the first human trial. (2020-10-28)

Renewable energy targets can undermine sustainable intentions
Renewable energy targets (RETs) may be too blunt a tool for ensuring a sustainable future, according to University of Queensland-led research. PhD candidate Scott Spillias, from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said that, while RETs are a go-to for policymakers, more nuanced approaches were more effective at actually achieving holistic, sustainable outcomes. (2020-10-27)

DNA sleuths target ivory poachers
The tiniest amount of DNA is being accurately analysed to identify the origins of old ivory. This clever new technique has the potential to thwart international ivory poachers, by placing the origins of ivory pieces into accurate source locations, thereby identifying specific areas where ivory poachers are actively operating. (2020-10-26)

Globalized economy making water, energy and land insecurity worse: Study
The first large-scale study of the risks that countries face from dependence on water, energy and land resources has found that globalisation may be decreasing, rather than increasing, the security of global supply chains. (2020-10-25)

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. to publish Journal of Correctional Health Care
The National Commission on Correctional Health Care (NCCHC) has awarded the contract to publish Journal of Correctional Health Care to Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, effective January 2021. (2020-10-23)

Are bushmeat hunters aware of zoonotic disease? Yes, but that's not the issue
A recent paper published in the journal PLOS ONE, outlines how researchers with the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine and Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, measured the attitudes, practices and zoonoses awareness among community members associated with the bushmeat trade in northern Uganda. (2020-10-22)

Player behavior in the online game EVE Online may reflect real world country
Virtual worlds may reflect social and economic behavior in the real world, according to a study published October 21, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andres M. Belaza and colleagues from Ghent University, Belgium. (2020-10-21)

High social and ecological standards for chocolate
Worldwide demand for food from the tropics that meets higher environmental and social standards has risen sharply in recent years. Consumers often have to make ethically questionable decisions: products may be available through child labour, starvation wages or environmental destruction. Building on an interdisciplinary project in Peru, an international research team including Göttingen Univeristy published an overview on the transition to responsible, high-quality cocoa production. This 'Perspective' article appeared in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution. (2020-10-19)

Hurricanes, heavy rains are critical for Hawai'i's groundwater supply
New research led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa scientists indicates that rain brought to the islands by hurricanes and Kona storms can often be the most important precipitation for re-supplying groundwater in many regions of the island of O'ahu. (2020-10-12)

Siberian scientists identified the most promising Russian forest products
A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University evaluated the competitiveness of Russian forest industry products by analyzing international trade data from different regions of the country and comparing it to the data from other markets. The study was published in the Forest Policy and Economics journal and supported by the Russian Science Foundation (project no. 19-18-00145). (2020-10-08)

Tracking sea turtle egg traffickers with GPS-enabled decoy eggs
By placing 3D-printed and GPS-enabled decoy sea turtle eggs into nests on the beach, it's possible to gather key evidence needed to expose rampant illegal trade of the eggs, suggests a study publishing in the journal Current Biology on October 5, 2020. The researchers specifically tested how well the decoy eggs work and their safety for the endangered turtles. (2020-10-05)

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