Current Yellowstone News and Events

Current Yellowstone News and Events, Yellowstone News Articles.
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New study reveals how fences hinder migratory wildlife in the West
Wildlife biologists at the University of California, Berkeley, combined GPS location data of tagged mule deer and pronghorn antelope with satellite imagery of Wyoming fences to find out just how often these animals encounter fences, and what happens when they do. The results, published on Jan. 7, 2021 in the Journal of Applied Ecology, help pinpoint which fences pose the biggest barrier to ungulates trying to access their ideal habitat. (2021-01-12)

Insights into the Yellowstone hotspot
The Yellowstone hotspot is well known for generating supereruptions in the geologic past that are far more explosive than historic examples. The origin and sustained longevity of the hotspot is less understood but is focused on two competing models, where the ascent of hot mantle is derived from either a deep-seated mantle plume or a shallow mantle source. (2021-01-07)

Identifying Canada's key conservation hot spots highlights problem
To stop biodiversity loss, Canada recently committed to protecting 30% of its land and sea by 2030. But making conservation decisions about where to locate new protected areas is complicated. It depends on data both about biodiversity and about a range of benefits (e.g. freshwater, climate regulation, recreation) that people get from nature. Despite the size of the country, new mapping suggests that less than 1% of Canada's land is a hot spot, providing all these benefits in one place. (2021-01-05)

Reawakened geyser does not foretell Yellowstone volcanic eruptions, study shows
Geyser eruptions, like volcanic eruptions, are a mystery, so the reactivation of Steamboat Geyser in Yellowstone in 2018 provided an opportunity to explore why geysers turn off and on, and what determines their periodicity. A team led by UC Berkeley researchers found little evidence of magma moving below the geyser, meaning no sign of imminent hydrothermal eruptions, but did discover a relationship between the height of the column and the depth of the water reservoir. (2021-01-04)

Stanford researchers develop DNA approach to forecast ecosystem changes
The rapid, low-cost technique is the first to analyze DNA left behind in animals' feces to map out complex networks of species interactions in a terrestrial system. It could help redefine conservation as we know it, identify otherwise hard-to-find species and guide a global effort to rewild vast areas. WATCH VIDEO: https://bit.ly/2IjVfSa (2020-11-10)

Did our early ancestors boil their food in hot springs?
Scientists have found evidence of hot springs near sites where ancient hominids settled, long before the control of fire. (2020-09-15)

A call to arms: Enlisting private land owners in conservation
In 1872 the United States created Yellowstone, the first National Park in the world. Since then many more parks, monuments, preserves, wildernesses and other protected areas have been created in the USA. Protected areas, like Yellowstone, are invaluable, but are they actually effective at preserving endangered species? And if not, how can future protected areas do better? (2020-07-17)

As rare animals disappear, scientist faces 'ecological grief'
As the wilds around Joanna Lamberts research sites in Africa and North America have vanished, the conservation biologist has struggled to keep hopeful amid the losses. (2020-06-12)

Discovery of ancient super-eruptions indicates the yellowstone hotspot may be waning
Throughout Earth's long history, volcanic super-eruptions have been some of the most extreme events ever to affect our planet's rugged surface. Surprisingly, even though these explosions eject enormous volumes of material -- at least 1,000 times more than the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens--and have the potential to alter the planet's climate, relatively few have been documented in the geologic record. (2020-06-03)

Reintroduction of wolves tied to return of tall willows in Yellowstone National Park
The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of tall willows in the park, according to a new Oregon State University-led study. (2020-05-28)

A new tool to predict volcanic eruptions
Earth's atmosphere is made up of 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen, a mixture that is unique in the solar system. But where did the nitrogen come from? Did it escape from Earth's mantle through volcanic activity? To try to answer these questions, CNRS researcher Jabrane Labidi and his colleagues collected samples of gas from several volcanic sites. Their highly precise data could help to predict future volcanic eruptions. (2020-04-15)

New geochemical tool reveals origin of Earth's nitrogen
Researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and their colleagues used a new geochemical tool to shed light on the origin of nitrogen and other volatile elements on Earth, which may also prove useful as a way to monitor the activity of volcanoes. (2020-04-15)

Bison in northern Yellowstone proving to be too much of a good thing
Increasing numbers of bison in Yellowstone National Park in recent years have become a barrier to ecosystem recovery in the iconic Lamar Valley in the northern part of the park. (2020-03-30)

Rare gas find solves puzzle of Southern Africa's soaring landscape
The discovery of gases released from deep beneath the Earth's crust could help to explain Southern Africa's unusual landscape, a study suggests. (2019-11-19)

Bats in attics might be necessary for conservation
Researchers investigate and describe the conservation importance of buildings relative to natural, alternative roosts for little brown bats in Yellowstone National Park. (2019-11-19)

What happens under the Yellowstone Volcano
A recent study by Bernhard Steinberger of the German GeoForschungsZentrum and colleagues in the USA helps to better understand the processes in the Earth's interior beneath the Yellowstone supervolcano. The paper will soon appear in the journal 'Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems' published by the American Geophysical Union. It is based on modelling the Earth's mantle. (2019-10-17)

What wolves' teeth reveal about their lives
UCLA biologist discovers what wolves' broken teeth reveal about their lives. (2019-09-24)

Key similarities discovered between human and archaea chromosomes
A study led by Indiana University is the first to reveal key similarities between chromosomes in humans and archaea. The work could advance use of the single-celled organism in research on cancer. (2019-09-19)

Fearing cougars more than wolves, Yellowstone elk manage threats from both predators
Wolves are charismatic, conspicuous, and easy to single out as the top predator affecting populations of elk, deer, and other prey animals. However, a new study has found that the secretive cougar is actually the main predator influencing the movement of elk across the winter range of northern Yellowstone National Park. (2019-08-02)

Red algae steal genes from bacteria to cope with environmental stresses
It's a case of grand larceny that could lead to new fuels and cleanup chemicals. Ten species of red algae stole about 1 percent of their genes from bacteria to cope with toxic metals and salt stress in hot springs, according to a study in the journal eLife. These red algal species, known as Cyanidiales, also stole many genes that allow them to absorb and process different sources of carbon in the environment to provide additional sources of energy and supplement their photosynthetic lifestyle. (2019-07-17)

Research details response of sagebrush to 2017 solar eclipse
The short period of darkness caused a significant reduction in photosynthesis and transpiration in the desert shrub, but not quite to the levels of nighttime, according to some of the most detailed research on plant response to solar eclipses ever reported. (2019-06-20)

What drives Yellowstone's massive elk migrations?
Yellowstone's migratory elk rely primarily on environmental cues, including a retreating snowline and the greening grasses of spring, to decide when to make the treks between their winter ranges and summer ranges, shows a new study led by University of California, Berkeley, researchers. The study combined GPS tracking data from more than 400 animals in nine major Yellowstone elk populations with satellite imagery to create a comprehensive model of what drives these animals to move. (2019-06-14)

'Fettuccine' may be most obvious sign of life on Mars, researchers report
A rover scanning the surface of Mars for evidence of life might want to check for rocks that look like pasta, researchers report in the journal Astrobiology. The bacterium that controls the formation of such rocks on Earth is ancient and thrives in harsh environments that are similar to conditions on Mars, said University of Illinois geology professor Bruce Fouke, who led the new, NASA-funded study. (See videos) (2019-05-29)

Aftershocks of 1959 earthquake rocked Yellowstone in 2017-18
A swarm of more than 3,000 small earthquakes in the Maple Creek area (in Yellowstone National Park but outside of the Yellowstone volcano caldera) between June 2017 and March 2018 are, at least in part, aftershocks of the 1959 quake. (2019-05-23)

Resilience of Yellowstone's forests tested by unprecedented fire
The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Monica Turner and her team describe what happens when Yellowstone -- adapted to recurring fires every 100 to 300 years -- instead burns twice in fewer than 30 years. Yellowstone as we know it faces an uncertain future, the researchers say, and one of the big questions they hope to answer is whether the forests can recover. (2019-05-20)

Snowmelt causes seismic swarm near California's Long Valley Caldera
A spring surge of meltwater, seeping through vertically tilted layers of rock, caused a seismic swarm near California's Long Valley Caldera in 2017, according to research presented at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting. (2019-04-25)

New study questions effects of reintroducing top predators
There's little evidence that reintroducing top predators to ecosystems will return them to the conditions that existed before they were wiped out, according to new research. (2019-04-03)

Yellowstone elk don't budge for wolves say scientists
Elk roam the winter range that straddles the northern boundary of Yellowstone National Park with little regard for wolves, according to a new study illustrating how elk can tolerate living in close proximity to the large predator. (2019-03-26)

Researchers find broad impacts from lake trout invasion in Yellowstone
The scientists analyzed data spanning more than four decades and concluded that the impact of lake trout in Yellowstone Lake -- in particular, the decline of native cutthroat trout -- has cascaded across the lake, its tributaries and the surrounding ecosystem. (2019-03-20)

New study informs debate on predator-prey relationships
Experts have shed new light on the relationship between predators and their prey after studying how elk responded to the risk posed by grey wolves in an American national park. (2019-03-07)

Capturing bacteria that eat and breathe electricity
WSU researchers traveled to Yellowstone National Park to find bacteria that may help solve some of the biggest challenges facing humanity -- environmental pollution and sustainable energy. (2019-03-05)

Montana State team discovers 'incredibly' diverse microbial community high in Yellowstone
Montana State University researchers Dan Colman and Eric Boyd published their findings from a Smoke Jumper Geyser Basin hot spring in the journal Nature Communications earlier this month. (2019-02-27)

Structure of virus that infects bacteria in hot springs is revealed
Scientists have revealed the structure of a virus infecting bacteria that thrive in 160-degree hot springs in places like Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. The discovery could lead to better targeted delivery of drugs into cells and new DNA sequencing technology, according to a study by Rutgers and other scientists in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2019-02-04)

A microbial hot spring in your basement
Microbes that thrive in some of the most extreme places on Earth have discovered another cozy place to live -- inside homes across the United States. (2019-01-14)

Red wolf DNA found in mysterious Texas canines
Princeton biologists Bridgett vonHoldt and Elizabeth Heppenheimer discovered that a mysterious group of canines spotted on Galveston Island, Texas, share DNA with both coyotes and a captive breeding group of red wolves from North Carolina. The animals also have unique genetic material that may represent genes that had been lost in the small population of wolves that began the captive breeding program in the 1970s. (2018-12-18)

Not in the DNA: Epigenetics discovered in single-celled archaea
Researchers have reported the first experimental evidence of epigenetics in the single-celled organisms known as archaea. The simplicity of archaea -- combined with the fact that their cells resemble eukaryotes' in some important ways -- may allow researchers to investigate epigenetic questions in humans much faster and more easily than was possible before, the authors say. (2018-12-03)

Yellowstone streams recovering thanks to wolf reintroduction
In the first study of its kind, research by Oregon State University scientists shows that the return of large terrestrial carnivores can lead to improved stream structure and function. (2018-11-08)

Hidden costs of disease to greater Yellowstone elk
For decades researchers have known that a bacterial disease in elk, bison and cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem causes periodic abortions in these animals and chronic illness in humans drinking infected cow's milk. The disease, called brucellosis, poses a financial concern for dairy producers and cattle ranchers, but its effects on the wild elk population have generally been considered minor. (2018-10-29)

Genetic breakthrough by CU Denver scientists will aid whitebark pine conservation efforts
A University of Colorado Denver-led research team for the first time developed reliable genetic markers known as nuclear microsatellites for the whitebark pine, a discovery that could improve the tree's prospects for survival. Whitebark pine, which is declining rapidly nearly range-wide, is currently being considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act. (2018-10-18)

Letting nature take its course: Wolves in Yellowstone National Park
Since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995, the park's ecosystem has become a deeply complex and heterogeneous system, aided by a strategy of minimal human intervention. The new study is a synthesis of 40 years of research on large mammals in Yellowstone National Park, conducted by University of Alberta ecologist Mark Boyce. (2018-10-16)

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