Current Zebrafish News and Events

Current Zebrafish News and Events, Zebrafish News Articles.
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Cre-controlled CRISPR: Conditional gene inactivation just got easier
The ability to turn a gene off only in a specific cell type is essential to modern life science. Thanks to the Cre-Controlled CRISPR it has just became simpler. The new method developed by researchers from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden with support from the DRESDEN-concept Genome Center (DCGC) offers a fast and easy approach for conditional gene inactivation. The findings were published in the journal ''Nature Communications.'' (2021-02-23)

Good cop, bad cop
Serendipitous observation leads to novel insight into how cancer-immune crosstalk can either promote or suppress tumour growth. Ultimately, this study's results may help develop novel cancer therapies as well as an assay to select patients for immunotherapy treatment. (2021-02-19)

Heartbeat secrets unlocked as cardiac rhythm gene role identified
Researchers have used the zebrafish (Danio rerio) to identify the role of a gene involved in cardiac rhythm, which could help explain the fundamentals of what it takes to make a human heartbeat. (2021-02-15)

Researchers find parallels in spread of brain cancer in mammals, zebrafish
Virginia Tech scientists have identified a new zebrafish model that could help advance glioblastoma multiforme research. Glioblastoma is an aggressive form of primary brain tumor - fewer than one in 20 patients survive five years after diagnosis. (2021-02-11)

Novel protein could reverse severe muscle wasting in disease, aging and trauma
Muscle stem cells drive the tissue's growth and repair after such injuries. But growing these cells in the lab and using them to therapeutically replace damaged muscle has been frustratingly difficult. Australian researchers have discovered a factor that triggers these muscle stem cells to proliferate and heal. In a mouse model of severe muscle damage, injections of this naturally occurring protein led to the complete regeneration of muscle and the return of normal movement after severe muscle trauma. (2021-02-10)

Researchers replicate a potential step of the fin-to-limb transition in zebrafish
By tweaking a single gene, scientists engineered zebrafish that show the beginnings of limb-like appendages. The researchers stumbled upon this mutation, which may shed light on the sea-to-land transition of vertebrates, while screening for gene mutants and their impact on fish development. Their discovery, outlined February 4th in the journal Cell, marks a fundamental step in our understanding of fin-to-limb evolution and how simple genetic changes can create leaps in the development of complex structures. (2021-02-04)

Can a fin become a limb?
Researchers at Harvard and Boston Children's Hospital examine what's happening at genetic level to drive patterns in fin skeleton versus limb skeleton and find mutants with modified fins in a more limb-like pattern by adding new bones, complete with muscles and joints. The results reveal the ability to form limb-like structures was present in the common ancestor of tetrapods and teleost fishes and has been retained in a latent state which can be activated by genetic changes. (2021-02-04)

What evolution reveals about the function of bitter receptors
What 400 million years of evolutionary history reveal about the function of both fish and human bitter receptors was recently published in the journal Genome Biology and Evolution by a team of researchers led by the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich and the University of Cologne. (2021-02-02)

Imaging zebrafish movements in 3D to better understand ALS disease
An interdisciplinary team of the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) used an innovative imaging technique for a better understanding of motor deficits in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). The researchers were able to follow the escape behaviour of normal and disease zebrafish models, in 3D. Their results have recently been published in Optica, the flagship journal of the Optical Society (OSA). (2021-01-29)

In a tight spot
A newly discovered circuit helps fish to prioritize. (2021-01-27)

University of Cincinnati student uses zebrafish to study spinal deformities
Oriana Zinani, a doctoral student in molecular developmental biology at the University of Cincinnati, is part of a team of researchers using zebrafish embryos to study a gene mutation that causes scoliosis, a sideways curvature of the spine that typically occurs in humans just before puberty. (2021-01-22)

Elusive link between seizures, cell signaling protein ID'd in zebrafish
A team of Virginia Tech scientists led by Yuchin Albert Pan, an associate professor at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC, have identified a new link between seizures and connexin 36 deficiency. The discovery, published Jan. 11 in Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, found that this interaction may make the brain more prone to having seizures. (2021-01-11)

Patterns in primordial germ cell migration
Biologists and mathematicians at the Universities of Münster and Erlangen-Nürnberg investigated how primordial germ cells behave in zebrafish embryos when not influenced by a guidance cue and developed software that merges 3D microscopy images of multiple organisms. This made it possible to recognise patterns in the cell distribution and thus to highlight tissues that influence cell migration. The study was published in 'Science Advances'. (2021-01-07)

Tracing the many paths of vision
New study decodes the molecular diversity of neurons in the zebrafish retina. (2020-12-23)

Nanoplastics alter intestinal microbiome and threaten human health
A review study led by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), the CREAF and the University of Aveiro concludes that nanoplastics change the composition and diversity of gut microbiome in vertebrates and invertebrates. The effects of a widespread and prolonged exposure to nanoplastics observed in animal models could be applied to humans. (2020-12-21)

Chronic stress? Zebrafish to the rescue
A team of researchers led by MIPT's Allan Kalueff has studied chronic stress in zebrafish and determined that the animal can serve as a valuable model species for research into the associated brain diseases, complementing research currently done on rodents. The paper was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-14)

Global warming is faster than evolution
If global warming happens too quickly, not all species will be able to adapt in time. (2020-12-14)

Screening for endocrine disruption in artificial zebrafish for long-term risk assessment
the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that the collaborative research team led by Dr. Young Jun Kim, leader of environmental safety at KIST Europe, and Professor Hyunjoon Kong from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign tried to develop the long-term toxicity and risks by cultivating organoids that mimic the liver of zebrafish. (2020-12-11)

A matter of balance: asymmetric divisions are crucial to form a functional retina
Researchers at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, Germany, have discovered that in the developing retina, and important part of the central nervous system, the divisions leading to the first differentiating neurons are asymmetric and that this asymmetry is necessary to generate the correct types of neurons in the right numbers and proportions. (2020-12-11)

What social distancing does to a brain
Scientists discover a neuropeptide that reflects the current state of a fish's social environment (2020-12-02)

BICRA gene provides answers to patients, doctors and scientists
Researchers identified the BICRA gene as a new disease gene involved in a neurodevelopmental disorder and found evidence that BICRA functions in neural development in humans and flies. (2020-11-23)

The right tune for blood
Repetitive elements trigger RIG-I-like receptors to enhance hematopoietic stem cell formation (2020-11-15)

Fish give insight on sound sensitivity in autism
Scientists at The University of Queensland used zebrafish that carry the same genetic mutations as humans with Fragile X syndrome and autism, and discovered the neural networks and pathways that produce the hypersensitivities to sound in both species. (2020-11-10)

Pituitary puzzle gets a new piece, revising evolutionary history
For decades, the front lobe of the pituitary was thought to be an evolutionary development that arose in vertebrates from a particular type of embryonic structure located in the ectoderm. USC researchers now present evidence that, in some vertebrates, the endoderm also forms part of the pituitary's front lobe. Findings from the study suggest that the gland may have a longer evolutionary history than previously thought. (2020-10-22)

Findings shed light on the ancient origins of speed control during movement
Movement in animals is complex. Little has been known about how spinal inhibitory interneurons work to silence other neurons and related muscle groups in coordination with the active muscle groups across changing speeds. Now a Northwestern University research team has discovered in a study of zebrafish that there is a very orderly relationship between when these critical inhibitory neurons are born, their participation in different speeds of movement and what part of a motor neuron they innervate. (2020-10-22)

The right cells in the right spot
Neurons in a visual brain area of zebrafish are arranged as a map for catching prey. (2020-10-19)

Classic optical illusion leads to the discovery of critical neurons in zebrafish.
By exposing larval zebrafish to a well-known optical illusion, researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology and National Institute of Genetics have found a clever way to isolate key clusters of neurons critical to processing the direction of motion in the zebrafish's environment. The full results were published in the journal Neuron in September 2020. (2020-10-15)

Rare congenital heart defect rescued by protease inhibition
A research team at the Greenwood Genetic Center (GGC) has successfully used small molecules to restore normal heart and valve development in an animal model for Mucolipidosis II (ML II), a rare genetic disorder. The study is reported in this month's JCI Insight. (2020-10-15)

Study provides new hope for children suffering from rare muscle diseases
Stephen Greenspan and Laura Zah were devastated when they learned their son Alexander had a rare genetic mutation, which causes a deadly neuromuscular disease with no known treatment or cure. But the results of an international study, led by researchers from Monash University in Australia, provides renewed hope for children suffering from the progressive and devastating muscle disease. (2020-10-13)

New research provides fresh hope for children suffering from rare muscle diseases
Results of an international study published today in Autophagy and led by researchers from Monash University, School of Biological Sciences, provides renewed hope for children suffering from a progressive and devastating muscle disease. (2020-10-09)

Mammals share gene pathways that allow zebrafish to grow new eyes
Working with fish, birds and mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report new evidence that some animals' natural capacity to regrow neurons is not missing, but is instead inactivated in mammals. (2020-10-07)

Researchers identify process for regenerating neurons in the eye and brain
A team of researchers from the University of Notre Dame, Johns Hopkins University, Ohio State University and the University of Florida has identified networks of genes that regulate the process responsible for determining whether neurons will regenerate in certain animals, such as zebrafish. (2020-10-05)

How cells build organisms
Researchers at Harvard Medical School have discovered a key control mechanism that cells use to self-organize in early embryonic development. The findings, published in Science, shed light on a process fundamental to multicellular life and open new avenues for improved tissue and organ engineering strategies. (2020-10-01)

Sticking together
In unraveling how a single cell develops into a complex organism, one vexing question has remained for developmental biology: How do robust patterns form in the body? An answer has now been found for the zebrafish neural tube. In this paradigm of patterned tissues, the varying stickiness of cells combined with gradients of signaling molecules is responsible for generating a robust pattern. This is the result of a study published in Science. (2020-10-01)

Zebrafish embryos help prove what happens to nanoparticles in the blood
What happens to the nanoparticles when they are injected into the bloodstream, for example, to destroy solid tumours? With new results published in ACS Nano, researchers from Aarhus University are now ready to tackle such a challenging question using zebrafish embryos as a new study model in nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. (2020-09-30)

Vitamin D deficiency leads to obesity, stunted growth in zebrafish
Using a zebrafish model, researchers have found that vitamin D deficiency during early development can disrupt the metabolic balance between growth and fat accumulation. (2020-09-29)

Fungal compound inhibits important group of proteins
Researchers in the group of Jeroen den Hertog at the Hubrecht Institute in the Netherlands, in collaboration with researchers in Leiden, have found that a compound inhibits a group of proteins called BMP receptors. This compound, called cercosporamide, was previously only known to inhibit a different group of proteins. When overactive, BMP receptors can lead to several diseases. Studying compounds that may counteract this overactivity may lead to more treatment options in the future. (2020-09-28)

USC-led study traces the evolution of gill covers
In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences (PNAS), USC Stem Cell scientists and their collaborators have identified a key modification to the genome that led to the evolution of gill covers more than 430 million years ago. (2020-09-28)

Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known ''happy hormones'', and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with. (2020-09-22)

Study shows vitamin E needed for proper nervous system development
- In research with key ramifications for women of childbearing age, scientists show that embryos produced by vitamin E-deficient zebrafish have malformed brains and nervous systems. (2020-09-21)

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