Current Zika Virus News and Events

Current Zika Virus News and Events, Zika Virus News Articles.
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Replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2 in 3D
Researchers have studied SARS-CoV-2 replication in cells and obtained detailed insights into the alterations induced in infected cells. This information is essential to guide the development of urgently needed therapeutic strategies for suppressing viral replication and induced pathology. (2020-11-23)

COVID19 A research of Politecnico di Milano discovering the secrets of viral sequences
Use of an algorithm for computing viral mutations homogeneously across sources, using cloud computing. (2020-11-23)

The drug aprotinin inhibits entry of SARS-CoV2 in host cells
In order for the SARS-CoV2 virus to enter host cells, its ''spike'' protein has to be cleaved by the cell's own enzymes - proteases. The protease inhibitor aprotinin can prevent cell infection, as scientists at Goethe University, the University of Kent and the Hannover Medical School have now discovered. An aprotinin aerosol is already approved in Russia for the treatment of influenza and could readily be tested for the treatment of COVID-19. (2020-11-23)

New insight into the effect of hydroxychloroquine undermines its use in COVID-19
Researchers at Radboud university medical center have discovered an as yet unknown effect of hydroxychloroquine. It inhibits the action of a type of white blood cells important in the first line of defense against infections. Based on this research, hydroxychloroquine is unlikely to be beneficial in clearing viral infections including the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, they write in their publication in Cell Reports Medicine. (2020-11-23)

New study provides deep insights into transmission and mutation properties of SARS-CoV-2
In the COVID-19 pandemic, 57 million people have already been infected worldwide. In the search for vaccines and therapies, a precise understanding of the virus is crucial. A recent study by CeMM Principal Investigator Andreas Bergthaler's research group makes an important contribution to this. The high quality of epidemiological data in Austria, together with state-of-the-art virus genome sequencing, has supported unprecedented insights of the mutation behaviour and transmission of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (2020-11-23)

Altered 'coat' disguises fatal brain virus from neutralizing antibodies
A genetic modification in the 'coat' of a brain infection-causing virus may allow it to escape antibodies, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They say testing people for this and other viral mutations may help identify patients at risk for developing a fatal brain disease. (2020-11-20)

Frequent, rapid testing could cripple COVID within weeks, study shows
When it comes to curbing the spread of COVID-19, test frequency and test turnaround-time are far more important than test sensitivity, according to a new study published in the journal Science Advances. The authors say frequent, rapid tests make ''personalized stay-at-home orders'' possible. (2020-11-20)

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 via pork meat unlikely according to current state of knowledge
State media in China have claimed that a worker has become infected with the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) from a knuckle of pork imported from Germany. The infection is reported to have taken place in a cold store. Traces of SARS-CoV-2 were detected on packaging as well as on a door knob. (2020-11-19)

Insights on a mechanism to stop COVID-19 replication
Stopping the replication of SARS-CoV-2 is likely possible thanks to a compound called EBSELEN: a group of researchers from the Politecnico di Milano has communicated aspects relevant to the blocking of replication mechanism in the New Journal of Chemistry. (2020-11-19)

Antibody cocktails at low doses could be more effective at treating COVID-19
Pairs of antibodies may be more effective than single antibodies at preventing and treating COVID-19, according to a new study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and The Rockefeller University in New York. The study, published November 19, 2020 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), also suggests that in addition to blocking SARS-CoV-2's entry into cells, the antibodies may combat the virus by enlisting various types of white blood cells to fight the infection. (2020-11-19)

Vibrations of coronavirus proteins may play a role in infection
MIT research finds vibrations of the protein spikes on coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2, play a crucial part in allowing the virus to penetrate human cells. The findings could help determine how dangerous different strains or mutations of coronaviruses may be, and might point to a new approach to developing treatments. (2020-11-19)

Greater mosquito susceptibility to Zika virus fueled the epidemic
By experimentally comparing wild populations of Ae. aegypti the researchers discovered that the invasive subspecies is very effective at transmitting the Zika virus not only because it has more frequent contacts with humans for blood meals, but also as a result of its greater susceptibility to the virus relative to the African subspecies. (2020-11-19)

'Domestication' increases mosquito's zika virus susceptibility
The Aedes aegypti aegypti subspecies of mosquito, which has become a ''domestic'' pest worldwide, can acquire and transmit Zika virus more easily than its African forerunner. (2020-11-19)

Engineered immune cells elicit broad response to HIV in mice, offering hope for vaccine
Unlike so many other deadly viruses, HIV still lacks a vaccine. The virus has proven especially tricky to prevent with conventional antibodies, in part because it evolves so rapidly in the body. A solution would require coaxing the body into producing a special type of antibody that can act broadly to defeat multiple strains of the virus at once. Scientists at Scripps Research moved closer to attaining that goal with an approach that would rely on genetically engineered immune cells from the patient's body. (2020-11-19)

Children's Hospital Los Angeles conducts largest pediatric genomic COVID-19 study to date
Scientists at Children's Hospital Los Angeles analyze the largest group of genetically-sequenced Sars-CoV-2 samples to date. Their findings suggest a potential link between certain mutations and disease severity. (2020-11-19)

The Lancet Microbe: Infectiousness peaks early in COVID-19 patients, emphasising the need to rapidly isolate cases
Although SARS-CoV-2 genetic material may still be detected in respiratory or stool samples for several weeks, no live virus (that can cause infection) was found in any type of sample collected beyond nine days of symptoms starting and people with SARS-CoV-2 are mostly likely to be highly infectious from symptom onset and the following five days, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis of three human coronaviruses published in The Lancet Microbe journal. (2020-11-19)

Coinfection: more than the sum of its parts
Infections with two pathogens pose a serious threat in the clinics. Researchers from Würzburg and Jena have developed a technique that provides new insights into this process and can be used as an early warning system. (2020-11-18)

Many unresolved questions remain regarding T cell immunity to SARS-CoV-2
T cell responses are critical for providing early control and clearance of many viral infections, but there remain many unknowns concerning T cell immunity in COVID-19. Some T cell responses may even have a detrimental impact on the clinical outcome and contribute to long COVID, a phenomenon that affects roughly 10% of COVID-19 patients, causing them to experience an array of symptoms for a month or longer. (2020-11-18)

Lurking in genomic shadows: How giant viruses fuel the evolution of algae
Together, Aylward and Moniruzzaman have recently discovered that endogenous viral elements that originate from giant viruses are much more common in chlorophyte green algae than previously thought. (2020-11-18)

Gut microbiome manipulation could result from virus discovery
Scientists have discovered how a common virus in the human gut infects and takes over bacterial cells - a finding that could be used to control the composition of the gut microbiome, which is important for human health. The Rutgers co-authored research, which could aid efforts to engineer beneficial bacteria that produce medicines and fuels and clean up pollutants, is published in the journal Nature. (2020-11-18)

Lethal brain infections in mice thwarted by decoy molecule
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a molecule that protects mice from brain infections caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), a mosquito-borne virus notorious for causing fast-spreading, deadly outbreaks in Mexico, Central America and northern South America. (2020-11-18)

Researchers recognize a viral protein's M.O. by just 3% of its size
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from Russia, the US, and Sweden have described an unusual RNA polymerase that helps a poorly studied crAss-like bacteriophage transcribe its genes. They ''caught'' this enzyme by a tiny -- less than 3% of its size -- portion of the amino acid sequence that was similar to other RNA polymerases. (2020-11-18)

Two K-State studies focus on SARS-CoV-2 transmission in domestic cats, pigs
Two recently published studies from Kansas State University researchers and collaborators include important findings related to SARS-CoV-2 transmission and the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-18)

How the polio vaccine virus occasionally becomes dangerous
The polio vaccines, developed by Jonas Salk and Albert Sabin in the mid-1950s, heralded the elimination of polio from the U.S., saving countless children from sudden paralysis and death. In the developing world, however, outbreaks of poliovirus still occur sporadically, an ironic consequence of the polio vaccine itself. A new genetic study of the vaccine poliovirus reveals how this happens in real time. (2020-11-18)

Seeking the most effective polymers for personal protective equipment
Personal protective equipment, like face masks and gowns, is generally made of polymers. But not much attention is typically given to the selection of polymers used beyond their physical properties. To help with the identification of materials that will bind to a virus and speed its inactivation for use in PPE, researchers have developed a high-throughput approach for analyzing the interactions between materials and viruslike particles. They report their method in the journal Biointerphases. (2020-11-17)

Study reveals how smoking worsens COVID-19 infection in the airways
UCLA researchers using a model of airway tissue created from human stem cells have pinpointed how smoking cigarettes causes more severe infection by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in the airways of the lungs. (2020-11-17)

Are e-cigarette users at greater risk of poor immune response to flu, COVID?
In a controlled study of smokers, nonsmokers, and e-cigarette users, University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers found that e-cigarette users exhibited significantly altered immune responses to a model of influenza virus infection, suggesting increased susceptibility to disease, including possibly COVID-19. (2020-11-17)

Key patient insights the missing link in understanding COVID-19 and its mutations
A new study led by Australia's national science agency CSIRO, has found 95.5 per cent of current entries in GISAID, the world's largest novel coronavirus genome database, do not contain relevant patient information -- a critical piece of the puzzle to understand the virus and how it is evolving. (2020-11-16)

Evidence shows human transmission in deadly outbreak of mysterious disease in Bolivia
Researchers have discovered that a deadly virus found in Bolivia can spread from person to person in healthcare settings, raising potential concerns of additional outbreaks in the future, according to new findings presented today at the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH). The research also provides preliminary evidence regarding the species of rodent that carries the virus and may spread it to people or to other animals that can infect humans. (2020-11-16)

Identification of the SARS-CoV-2 virus features causing COVID-19 using primate model
Features of the SARS-CoV-2 virus causing COVID-19, which could be useful for developing vaccines and treatment strategies, were identified using a nonhuman primate model developed at the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology(KRIBB). (2020-11-15)

Researchers develop virus live stream to study virus infection
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute and Utrecht University developed an advanced technique that makes it possible to monitor a virus infection live. The researchers from the groups of Tanenbaum and Van Kuppeveld expect that the technique can be used to study a wide variety of viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. The technique named VIRIM is very valuable for gaining insights in virus infection in the human body, which can lead to more targeted treatments. (2020-11-13)

Shutting Down COVID-19 virus' destructive proteins with aerosolized molecules
Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have successfully used molecules comprised of small strands of RNA to shut down the production of destructive proteins generated by the COVID-19 virus. Additionally, the researchers are working to aerosolize the RNA molecules so that they could be incorporated in an inhalable drug that would mitigate viral chaos. (2020-11-13)

Why does COVID-19 seem to spare children?
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and their colleagues have determined a key factor as to why COVID-19 appears to infect and sicken adults and older people preferentially while seeming to spare younger children. (2020-11-13)

Here's why conservatives and liberals differ on COVID-19
According to a new study from Lehigh Business, the differences between conservative and liberal responses to COVID-19 are mitigated when people perceive the virus itself to have agency -- the ability to control its own actions and thus exert power over people. Conservatives are generally more sensitive to threats that are relatively high in agency, say researchers with Lehigh University's College of Business and KU Leuven, Belgium. (2020-11-13)

COVID-19 survival among elderly patients could be improved by arthritis drug
A type of arthritis drug may reduce the risk of dying for elderly patients with COVID-19. (2020-11-13)

People of Black and Asian ethnicity up to twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 as those of White ethnicity
People of Black ethnicity are twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 compared to those of White ethnicity. People from Asian backgrounds are 1.5 times more likely to become infected with the virus compared to White individuals. Those of Asian ethnicities may be at higher risk of admission to an intensive therapy unit (ITU) and death. (2020-11-12)

Rats also capable of transmitting hantavirus
A group of researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have confirmed Germany's first-ever case of animal-to-human transmission involving a specific species of virus known as the 'Seoul virus'. Working alongside colleagues from Friedrich-Loeffer-Institut (FLI), the researchers were able to confirm the presence of the virus in a young female patient and her pet rat. (2020-11-12)

Survey: Americans likely to attend large holiday gatherings despite COVID-19
A new national survey by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds that although a majority of Americans plan to take precautions at holiday gatherings, such as social distancing and asking those with COVID symptoms not to attend, many will also put themselves at risk. Nearly two in five report they will likely attend a gathering with more than 10 people and a third will not ask guests to wear masks. (2020-11-12)

Common SARS-CoV-2 mutation may make COVID-19 more susceptible to a vaccine
A common strain of coronavirus has mutated to help it spread quickly, but the spike mutation may make SARS-CoV-2 more susceptible to vaccines under development, according to a new study in Science. (2020-11-12)

Examining impact of a point mutation in SARS-Cov-2 spike on virus transmission and pathogenicity
The current dominant variant of SARS-CoV-2, containing a D614G substitution in the spike protein, appears to have evolved to enhance transmissibility, according to a new study in human cells and animal models. (2020-11-12)

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