Current Zika Virus News and Events | Page 2

Current Zika Virus News and Events, Zika Virus News Articles.
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Chemists discover the structure of a key coronavirus protein
MIT chemists have determined the molecular structure of a protein found in the SARS-CoV-2 virus. This protein forms a cation-selective channel and plays a key role in the virus's ability to replicate itself. If researchers could devise ways to block this channel, they may be able to reduce the pathogenicity of the virus and interfere with viral replication. (2020-11-12)

Sorting out viruses with machine learning
Researchers at Osaka University created a machine-learning system to identify single viral particles that cause respiratory diseases, including coronavirus, using silicon nanopores. The method does not require labels or reagents and may lead to much cheaper and rapid detection of viruses that cause infectious diseases such as COVID-19. (2020-11-11)

Uracil switch in SARS-CoV-2 genome alters innate immune responses
Our bodies could be inducing mutations in the COVID-19 virus that activate immune cells to increase the production of pro-inflammatory molecules. (2020-11-11)

MTU, UMass researchers preserve viral vaccines without refrigeration
Half of vaccines are wasted annually because they aren't kept cold. Michigan Tech and UMass Amherst chemical engineers have discovered a way to stabilize viruses in vaccines with proteins instead of temperature. (2020-11-11)

In the Netherlands, two-way transmission of SARS-CoV-2 transmission on mink farms
In the Netherlands, whole genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks on 16 mink farms has revealed virus transmission between human to mink, as well as from mink to human. (2020-11-10)

Plasma treatments quickly kill coronavirus on surfaces
Researchers from UCLA believe using plasma could promise a significant breakthrough in the fight against the spread of COVID-19. In Physics of Fluids, modeling conducted showed strains of the coronavirus on surfaces like metal, leather, and plastic were killed in as little as 30 seconds of treatment with argon-fed, cold atmospheric plasma. The researchers used an atmospheric pressure plasma jet they built with a 3D printer to spray surfaces that were treated with SARS-CoV-2 cultures. (2020-11-10)

Researchers discover enzyme suppressing immune response to viral infections
Viruses such as HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C evade or disrupt the immune system to create persistent infections. These viruses remain a serious health threat, but researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered how an enzyme that regulates several cellular processes might be a key target to preventing viruses from disarming the human immune response. (2020-11-10)

Could SARS-CoV-2 evolve resistance to COVID-19 vaccines?
Similar to bacteria evolving resistance to antibiotics, viruses can evolve resistance to vaccines, and the evolution of SARS-CoV-2 could undermine the effectiveness of vaccines that are currently under development, according to a paper published November 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by David Kennedy and Andrew Read from Pennsylvania State University, USA. The authors also offer recommendations to vaccine developers for minimizing the likelihood of this outcome. (2020-11-09)

COVID Misinformation a Roadblock to Curbing Pandemic
Two new studies suggest that the spread of misinformation about COVID-19 will make it harder for communities to bring the pandemic under control. stereotypes and fears of stigma may be barriers to COVID testing, a finding that confirms previous studies about stigma around HIV and Ebola. And believing COVID conspiracies makes people less likely to support public health policies to reduce the spread of the virus. (2020-11-09)

Peering under the "hood" of SARS-CoV-2
Microscope and protein data are incorporated into an easy-to-use-and-update tool that can model an organism's 3D appearance. (2020-11-08)

Vaccine shows promise against herpes virus
A genetically edited form of a herpes simplex virus has outperformed a leading vaccine candidate in a new study published in Nature Vaccines. When challenged with a virulent strain of the sexually transmitted HSV-2, vaccinated guinea pigs displayed fewer genital lesions, less viral replication and less of the viral shedding that most readily spreads infection. (2020-11-06)

Pre-existing coronavirus antibodies could help protect children against new pandemic strain
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and University College London have found that some antibodies, created by the immune system during infection with common cold coronaviruses, can also target SARS-CoV-2 and may confer a degree of protection against the new viral strain. (2020-11-06)

Host genetic factors shape composition of virus communities
Plants can be infected by multiple viruses at once. However, the composition of the pathogen community varies, even if individuals belong to the same species and the same population. Ecologists at the University of Zurich have now shown that these differences are primarily due to genetic variation among the hosts. The loss of genetic diversity could thus render species more vulnerable to infections and extinction. (2020-11-05)

Researchers use genomics to reconstitute yellow fever outbreak in São Paulo
Three waves of the disease swept the state between 2016 and 2018. An international group of researchers described how the virus spread in a study based on the sequencing of 51 viral isolates extracted from mosquitoes and monkeys. (2020-11-05)

Virus that causes COVID-19 puts a plug in cellular defenses
One of the novel coronavirus' most insidious tricks is that it can block the ability of cells to produce protective proteins without hindering its own ability to replicate. A new Yale study reveals how it does it. (2020-11-05)

SARS-CoV-2 uses 'genome origami' to infect and replicate inside host cells
Scientists at the University of Cambridge, in collaboration with Justus-Liebig University, Germany, have uncovered how the genome of SARS-CoV-2 - the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 - uses genome origami to infect and replicate successfully inside host cells. (2020-11-05)

Stable protein decoy neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in cells and protected hamsters from viral challenge
Researchers have designed a protein 'decoy' that mimics the interface where the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein binds a human cell, one version of which could neutralize virus infection in cells and protect hamsters from viral challenge. (2020-11-05)

Children produce different antibodies in response to SARS-CoV-2
Compared with adults, children produce a very different antibody response after infection with the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, suggesting they clear the virus easily. (2020-11-05)

Safety of HPV vaccines in males
A new analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology shows that HPV vaccines are safe and well tolerated in the male population, and the side effects that may occur after immunization are similar in both sexes. (2020-11-04)

Scientists identify synthetic mini-antibody to combat COVID-19
By screening hundreds of synthetic mini-antibodies called sybodies, a group of scientists has identified one that might stop SARS-CoV-2 from infecting human cells. (2020-11-04)

Being in treatment with statins reduces COVID-19 mortality by 22% to 25%
A research by the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV) and Pere Virgili Institut (IISPV) led by Lluís Masana has found that people who are being treated with statins have a 22% to 25% lower risk of dying from COVID-19. (2020-11-04)

Scientists find Ebola virus antibodies in people before 2018 DRC outbreak
Scientists found antibodies to Ebola virus in people up to a year before the 2018 Ebola virus disease outbreak began in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC. This suggests that either early cases may have been missed or that exposure occurs more commonly than previously thought, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. (2020-11-04)

Case study details leukemia patient who shed infectious SARS-CoV-2 for at least 70 days
The majority of people infected with SARS-CoV-2 appear to actively shed infectious virus for about 8 days, but there is a wide range of variability from person to person. Researchers report November 4 in the journal Cell an unusual case of one woman with leukemia and a low antibody count who was infected with the coronavirus for at least 105 days, and infectious for at least 70, while remaining asymptomatic the entire time. (2020-11-04)

Fighting Zika? Call in the T cells
In a new Science Advances study, Shresta and her colleagues at LJI report that the immune system's T cells have the power to prevent Zika infection in mice. This finding suggests that effective Zika vaccines need to activate T cells to work alongside antibodies. (2020-11-04)

Coronavirus infection odds twice as high among Black, Latinx hospital workers
Support staff and Black and Latinx hospital employees with and without patient care responsibilities are at highest risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection in health care settings, a Rutgers study found. (2020-11-04)

Buffalo fly faces Dengue nemesis
Australian beef cattle researchers trial the use of insect-infecting bacterium Wolbachia to tackle buffalo fly, a major blood-sucking pest that costs the industry $100 million a year in treatments and lost production. (2020-11-03)

Plant viruses hijack the defence system of plants, but there might be a way to strike back
Recently discovered interactions between plant and viral proteins open up new avenues for making plants resistant to viruses, thus safeguarding crop yields in changing climate conditions. (2020-11-03)

Cornea appears to resist infection from novel coronavirus
Some doctors have worried that the novel coronavirus may be able to infect people by getting into their eyes. Viruses such as herpes simplex can infect the eye's cornea and Zika virus has been found in corneal tissue and tears, but new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests the cornea can resist infection from SARS-CoV-2. (2020-11-03)

Study uncovers subset of COVID-19 patients who recover quickly and sustain antibodies
Brigham investigators examined blood samples and cells from patients who had recovered from mild to moderate COVID-19 and found that while antibodies against the virus declined in most individuals after disease resolution, a subset of patients sustained anti-virus antibody production several months following infection. (2020-11-03)

Europe took centre-stage in global spread of the coronavirus, says new research
A collaboration between genome researchers at the University of Huddersfield and Portugal's University of Minho has discovered it is Europe, not China, which has been the main source of spreading the coronavirus disease around the world. (2020-11-03)

COVID-19 lung damage caused by persistence of 'abnormal cells'
Investigations of deceased COVID-19 patients have shed light on possible lung damage caused by the virus. (2020-11-03)

The role of the Sun in the spread of viral respiratory diseases
Why do most viral epidemics spread cyclically in autumn and winter in the globe's temperate regions? According to an interdisciplinary team of researchers of the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics, the University of Milan, the Lombardy regional agency for the environment and the Don Gnocchi Foundation, the answer is intimately related to our Sun (2020-11-02)

Focus on COVID-19 deaths in under-65s for better insights into infection rates
Simply comparing the total number of deaths across countries may provide a misleading representation of the underlying level of transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, because of large differences in reported COVID-19 death rates in elderly populations in different countries. (2020-11-02)

How the immune system remembers viruses
For a person to acquire immunity to a disease, T cells must develop into memory cells after contact with the pathogen. Until now, the number of cells that do this was believed to depend above all on the magnitude of the initial immune response. A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now called this into question. (2020-11-02)

Study provides clues on curbing the aggressive nature of coronavirus
Recent study by Estonian researchers in University of Tartu explains how coronavirus is activated before attacking the cell and what could help to impede that. The study published in Scientific Reports, takes us a step closer to understanding why the spread of SARS-CoV-2 has been so rapid and aggressive. The studied virus activation mechanism is also one potential target for developing drugs for the treatment of COVID-19. (2020-11-02)

Microfluidics helps MTU engineers watch viral infection in real time
Watching a viral infection happen in real time is like a cross between a zombie horror film, paint drying, and a Bollywood epic on repeat. Over a 10-hour span, chemical engineers from Michigan Tech watched viral infections happen with precision inside a microfluidics device and can measure when the infection cycle gets interrupted by an antiviral compound. (2020-11-02)

Covid-19 "super-spreading" events play outsized role in overall disease transmission
MIT researchers find Covid-19 super-spreading events, in which one person infects more than six other people, are much more frequent than anticipated, and that they have an outsized contribution to coronavirus transmission. (2020-11-02)

SARS-CoV-2 might attack red marrow and block new erythrocytes formation
Specialists from the Department of Fundamental Medicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with Russian and Japanese colleagues have probed into mechanisms of COVID-19 inside-the-body distribution linked to erythrocytes damaging. According to researchers, virus might attack red marrow, thus being detrimental not only for erythrocytes in the bloodstream but also for the process of the formation of the new ones. A related article appears in Archiv EuroMedica. (2020-10-30)

Wistar creates a new synthetic DNA vaccine against Powassan virus
Wistar scientists have designed and tested the first-of-its-kind synthetic DNA vaccine against Powassan virus (POWV), targeting portions of the virus envelope protein. (2020-10-30)

Coronavirus mutation may have made it more contagious
A study involving more than 5,000 COVID-19 patients in Houston finds that the virus that causes the disease is accumulating genetic mutations, one of which may have made it more contagious. This mirrors a study published in July that found that around the world, viral strains with the same genetic mutation quickly outcompeted other strains. (2020-10-30)

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