Current Abdominal pain News and Events

Current Abdominal pain News and Events, Abdominal pain News Articles.
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Tarantula toxin attacks with molecular stinger
A bird-catching Chinese tarantula bite contains a stinger-like poison that plunges into a molecular target in the electrical signaling system of their prey's nerve cells. New cryo-electron microscopy studies show how this venom traps the voltage sensors of sodium channels in a resting state so they can't be activated. Such research may suggest designs for better drugs for chronic pain. (2020-11-23)

Emergency imaging trends in pediatric vs. adult patients for abdominal pain
According to AJR, although pediatric CT use has decreased for the evaluation of abdominal pain (perhaps due to implementing an ultrasound-first strategy for suspected appendicitis), CT use has continued to increase among adults with abdominal pain in U.S. emergency department (ED) visits. Although trends in CT use have previously been reported for children and adults, this study is the first to contrast the two cohorts in the ED setting in a nationally representative sample. (2020-11-20)

Social isolation during COVID-19 pandemic linked with high blood pressure
Lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with an increase in high blood pressure among patients admitted to emergency. That's the finding of a study presented at the 46th Argentine Congress of Cardiology (SAC). SAC 2020 is a virtual meeting during 19 to 21 November. Faculty from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) will participate in joint scientific sessions with the Argentine Society of Cardiology as part of the ESC Global Activities programme. (2020-11-19)

Breathing problems in teens: COVID-19 or lung injury due to vaping?
In a case series of three teen patients, UC Davis Health pediatricians present common manifestations of COVID-19 and lung injury due to vaping (EVALI). As EVALI and COVID-19 share many symptoms, it is critical for health providers to get the vaping history of teenagers with unexplained breathing problems. (2020-11-19)

WeChat group of chest pain center for patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0590, Liu Yue, Qin Zhu-Yun, Yang Xin, Tang Rong and Gao Ling-Yun from the The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China consider the use of a social media platform (WeChat) to provide faster treatment and improve prognoses for a group of patients with acute ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction. (2020-11-19)

Neurorehabilitation experts highlight breakthroughs in neurogenic pain management
There have been significant advances in knowledge regarding the pathology, etiology, assessment, and treatment of several significant neurogenic pain disorders regularly encountered by neurorehabilitation professionals in both inpatient and outpatient care. In a collection of articles published in NeuroRehabilitation, experts describe the latest advancements in neurogenic classification and pain management and treatment of these disorders. (2020-11-18)

Novel technique 'stuns' arthritis pain in shoulder and hip
A novel outpatient procedure offers lasting pain relief for patients suffering from moderate to severe arthritis in their hip and shoulder joints, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Researchers said the procedure could help reduce reliance on addictive opiates. (2020-11-16)

Teeth grinding and facial pain increase due to coronavirus stress and anxiety
The stress and anxiety experienced by the general population during Israel's first lockdown brought about a significant rise in orofacial and jaw pain, as well as jaw-clenching in the daytime and teeth-grinding at night, according to a new study from Tel Aviv University (TAU). (2020-11-16)

A diet rich in ultra-processed fats and sugars increases the possibility of muscle pain
A research team from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona - Spain) has observed that following a diet rich in fats and sugars from ultra-processed foods (such as sweet rolls and pastries) for a six-week period increases the number of inflammatory molecules in the organism, which increases the excitability of the muscle nerves. This is known as musculoskeletal neurotransmission. (2020-11-13)

Cannabis to treat gynecological conditions
A significant number of women would consider using cannabis to treat gynecological conditions, primarily gynecological pain. (2020-11-12)

University of Pittsburgh neuroscientists advance understanding of pain from light touch
Researchers from the Pittsburgh Center for Pain Research uncovered additional complexities behind mechanical allodynia - the sensation of pain from innocuous stimuli, such as light touch. (2020-11-11)

3D printed stents that treat inflammation
POSTECH Professor Dong-Woo Cho's research team develops bioink-loaded esophageal stents for treating radiation esophagitis. (2020-11-10)

People with inflammatory bowel disease still die earlier despite increase in life
A study comparing life expectancy of people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and without found that, while life expectancy increased for both groups, people with IBD generally died sooner. The study is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.190976. (2020-11-09)

Researchers urge healthcare providers to routinely ask patients about cannabis use
Healthcare providers should talk to patients about their cannabis use the same way they talk about other habits like smoking and drinking: routinely and without judgment. Marian Wilson, lead author on a new paper about shared decision-making in talking about cannabis use, says some studies have suggested cannabis use is beneficial to patients with chronic pain who are also using opioids, which is why many in that patient population are using cannabis or considering it. (2020-11-05)

Study examines trends in symptoms experienced at the end of life
A new analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society indicates that fewer older adults may be experiencing certain symptoms that can restrict their activity at the end of life. (2020-11-04)

Review finds almost 20% of COVID-19 patients only show gastrointestinal symptoms
Almost one in five patients with COVID-19 may only show gastrointestinal symptoms, according to a review of academic studies published in the journal Abdominal Radiology. The findings of the review suggest abdominal radiologists need to remain vigilant during the pandemic while imaging patients. (2020-11-03)

Muscle pain and energy-rich blood: Cholesterol medicine affects the organs differently
Contrary to expectation, treatment with statins has a different effect on blood cells than on muscle cells, a new study from the University of Copenhagen reveals. Today, statins are mainly used in the treatment of elevated cholesterol, but the new results may help design drugs for a number of conditions. (2020-10-29)

Paracetamol poisonings up
In 2003, the painkiller paracetamol became available in Switzerland in tablets with a higher dose of the active ingredient. This correlates with an increase in cases of paracetamol poisoning in the country, as a data analysis by ETH researchers shows. (2020-10-28)

Effect of electroacupuncture on chronic low back pain
This randomized clinical trial compared the change in pain severity among adults with chronic low back pain who received electroacupuncture or a placebo treatment. (2020-10-27)

Treating spinal mets with fewer, higher doses of radiation reduces pain more effectively
A new study shows using fewer and higher doses of high-precision radiation therapy is a more effective approach for treating painful spinal tumors than conventional radiation therapy. Findings from the Canadian phase II/III trial (NCT02512965) will be presented today at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting. (2020-10-26)

Researchers develop a simplified method to modify disease signaling with light
Cellular optogenetics is a technique that allows researchers to use light to precisely control cell signaling and function in space and time enabling the investigation of mechanisms involved in disease processes. A research team from the University of Turku have developed a novel way to make cellular optogenetic tools much easier to monitor and apply, and showed how they can be used to investigate the cellular side effects of medicines used to treat cancer. (2020-10-22)

Palliative care needed across China for everyone who needs it -- study
Palliative care should extend across China and pay more attention to managing non-malignant disease -- integrated within the country's healthcare system and available to everyone who needs it, according to a new study. (2020-10-21)

Ketamine, a painkiller used by the army, does not impair tolerance to blood loss
A low dose of ketamine, administered intravenously, does not alter a healthy human's tolerance to blood loss. In other words, if someone was given ketamine to kill pain associated with a battlefield injury, they would be able to tolerate blood loss just as well as someone who did not received this pain killer. (2020-10-21)

Nonverbal doctor-patient rapport relieved pain during acupuncture treatment
When 22 acupuncture clinicians and 23 patients seeking pain relief mirrored each other's facial expressions during acupuncture treatment, patients experienced less pain, according to a new study. Additionally, brain activity involved in representing the mental state of others, which is key for empathy and compassion, became more aligned after the doctor and (2020-10-21)

Dual brain imaging provides insight into neural basis of patient-clinician relationship
Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital have reported on an experiment using a novel magnetic resonance imaging-based approach to track the effects of different behaviors on the brain while patients and clinicians interact with one another. Their research, published in Science Advances, suggests that mirroring in both facial expressions and brain activity can affect the patient-clinician bond and treatment. In this case, the patients were receiving treatment for pain from an acupuncturist. (2020-10-21)

More research needed to determine safety of hip and knee steroid injections
Although frequently used to treat painful osteoarthritis of the hip and knee, intra-articular corticosteroid (IACS) injections remain controversial. Questions about whether damage to joints occurs as a result of these injections, which are performed thousands a time each day, persist. (2020-10-20)

Treatment for inflammatory bowel disease doesn't always work; new study uncovers why
In preclinical study, researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles uncover role for TNF, the most common target in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Results pave way for better understanding of how TNF functions in normal intestinal development and provide foundation for future new therapies. (2020-10-20)

New dimensions in the treatment of muscle spasticity after stroke and nervous system defects
Chronic muscle spasticity after nervous system defects like stroke, traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and painful low back pain affect more than 10% of the population, with a socioeconomic cost of about 500 billion USD. Currently, there is no satisfying remedy to help these suffering people, which generates an immense medical need for a new generation antispastic drug. Drug candidate MPH-220 could mean new hope for millions of patients suffering from spasticity. (2020-10-16)

Malice leaves a nasty smell
Unhealthy behaviours trigger moral judgments that are similar to the basic emotions that contribute to our ability to survive. Two different hypotheses are to be found in the current scientific literature as to the identity of these emotions. After developing a new approach to brain imaging, a research team from the University of Geneva shows that unhealthy behaviours trigger brain responses that are similar to those prompted by bad smells. (2020-10-16)

Automatic decision-making prevents us harming others - new study
The processes our brains use to avoid harming other people are automatic and reflexive - and quite different from those used when avoiding harm to ourselves, according to new research. (2020-10-15)

Study finds athletes fear being judged as weak when they experience pain or injury
Trinity College Dublin researchers have carried out the first multi-centred, international, qualitative study exploring the athlete experience (in their own words) of sporting low back pain (LBP). The study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found a culture of concealment of pain and injury in rowers, leading to poor outcomes for these athletes. (2020-10-15)

Study identifies gene variants to help personalize treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis
A group of three gene variants, commonly inherited together, may provide clues to more successful treatment of pediatric eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammation of the food pipe often confused with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A new study, led by researchers from Nemours Children's Health System and published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, identifies genetic variants that help predict which children with EoE may not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medication therapy as a long-term solution. (2020-10-15)

Study reveals most effective drugs for common type of neuropathic pain
More than 20 million people in the U.S. suffer neuropathic pain. At least 25% of those cases are classified as unexplained and considered cryptogenic sensory polyneuropathy (CSPN). There is no information to guide a physician's drug choices to treat CSPN, but a researcher from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and MU Health Care led a first-of-its-kind prospective comparative effectiveness study. (2020-10-15)

Tissue grafts of both bone and cartilage could regenerate damage to a crucial jaw joint
Scientists have engineered tissue grafts that, in pigs, regenerated both bone and cartilage in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), a part of the jaw that can cause debilitating pain and disability when damaged. (2020-10-14)

Children's pain 'swept under the carpet for too long' - Lancet Commission
The launch of the Lancet Child and Adolescent Health Commission - the first ever to address paediatric pain - aims to raise the profile of children's pain from early years to early adulthood. (2020-10-13)

'Less pain' to remove tonsils
A 10-year study from Flinders University has found ''shrinking'' tonsils results in far less pain and bleeding than a full tonsillectomy. The research paper, published this month in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Surgery, looked at 608 children who underwent tonsil surgery between 2008 and 2018. (2020-10-13)

Labor epidurals do not cause autism; Safe for mothers and infants, say anesthesiology, obstetrics
Five medical societies aim to clearly reassure pregnant women that the article ''Association Between Epidural Analgesia During Labor and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders in Offspring,'' a new retrospective database study published in JAMA Pediatrics on October 12th, 2020 does not provide credible scientific evidence that labor epidurals for pain relief cause autism. (2020-10-12)

Asthma and food allergies during childhood associated with increased risk of IBS
Those with IBS at 16 were almost twice as likely to have had asthma at the age of 12 (11.2% vs 6.7%). Almost half of children with IBS at 16 (40.7%) reported food hypersensitivity at 12 years (compared to 29.2% of children without IBS at 16). (2020-10-11)

More than 40% of women suffer from constipation during pregnancy and right after childbirth
Women are 2-3 times more likely to suffer from constipation during pregnancy and right after childbirth than at any other time in their life, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2020-10-09)

Cannabis use appears to encourage, not replace, non-medical opioid use
Contrary to some claims, people in the US may not be substituting cannabis for opioids, New research at Columbia examined the direction and strength of association between cannabis and opioid use among adults who used non-medical opioids. The findings showed that opioid use was at least as prevalent on days when cannabis was used as on days when it was not. The study is among the first to test opioid substitution directly. (2020-10-08)

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