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Current Accidents News and Events, Accidents News Articles.
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Mathematics to keep farmers on track
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology researchers use numerical simulations and frequency response analysis to model the stability of tractors on rough terrain, which may increase farmer safety and promote the automation of agriculture. (2020-05-11)
Children & coronavirus infection (COVID-19): How to avoid post-traumatic stress disorder
COVID-19 is a pandemic that has forced many states to declare restrictive measures in order to prevent their wider spread. (2020-05-06)
Study reports high level of hazardous drinking among Pacific Islander young adults in US
Pacific Islander young adults in the US have an extremely high level of hazardous drinking and potential alcohol-use disorders, a University of California, Riverside, study has found. (2020-05-05)
Novel computational methods provide new insight into daytime alertness in people with sleep apnoea
New polysomnography parameters are better than conventional ones at describing how the severity of oxygen desaturation during sleep affects daytime alertness in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea, according to a new study published in European Respiratory Journal. (2020-04-21)
Some flowers have learned to bounce back after injury
Some flowers have a remarkable and previously unknown ability to bounce back after injury, according to a new study. (2020-04-07)
Representation of driving behavior as a statistical model
A joint research team from Toyohashi University of Technology has established a method to represent driving behaviors and their changes that differ among drivers in a single statistical model, taking into account the effect of various external factors such as road structure. (2020-04-02)
Sobering new data on drinking and driving: 15% of US alcohol-related motor vehicle fatalities involve alcohol under the legal limit
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, found that motor vehicle crashes involving drivers with blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) below the legal limit of 0.08 percent accounted for 15% of alcohol-involved crash deaths in the United States. (2020-03-16)
Case Western Reserve University research finds high rates of trauma exposure, PTSD symptoms for those in drug court
Nearly 94% of defendants in Cuyahoga County drug court have been exposed to trauma and many suffer from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new Case Western Reserve University study. (2020-03-10)
Paper: Disposal of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing poses dangers to drivers
A new paper co-written by Yilan Xu, a professor of agricultural and consumer economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, shows that the growing traffic burden in shale energy boomtowns from trucks hauling wastewater to disposal sites resulted in a surge of road fatalities and severe accidents. (2020-03-02)
Uber linked to a reduction in serious road traffic injuries in the UK
A study by University of Oxford researchers, published today in Social Science & Medicine, has found that ride-hailing provider, Uber, is associated with a 9% decline in serious road accident injuries in the UK. (2020-02-18)
Study suggests later school start times reduce car crashes, improve teen safety
A study published online as an accepted paper in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine found that later school start times were associated with a significant drop in vehicle accidents involving teen drivers. (2020-02-18)
Breaking up amino acids with radiation
A new experimental and theoretical study published in EPJ D has shown how the ions formed when electrons collide with one amino acid, glutamine, differ according to the energy of the colliding electrons. (2020-02-05)
Solitary confinement significantly increases post-prison death risk
Even just a few days of solitary confinement may significantly increase inmates' risk of death after serving their sentences. (2020-02-05)
Study links daylight saving time to 28 fatal car accidents per year in the US
Several US states have considered doing away with the practice of changing the clocks forward or back in favor of permanent Daylight Saving Time (DST), while experts around the world suggest permanent Standard Time is a better alternative for health and wellbeing. (2020-01-30)
'Spring forward' to daylight saving time brings surge in fatal car crashes
A study of 732,000 accidents over two decades has found that the annual switch to daylight saving time is associated with a 6% increase in fatal car crashes that week. (2020-01-30)
Newspaper 'hierarchy' of injury glamorises war
British newspapers are routinely glamorising combat by creating a moral separation between combat and non-combat injuries, according to new research published in the journal Media, War and Conflict. (2020-01-29)
Rising temperatures may cause over 2,000 fatal injuries per year in the US, predict researchers
A 2 degrees Celsius rise in temperatures could result in around 2,100 additional deaths from injuries every year in the United States. (2020-01-13)
Smart intersections could cut autonomous car congestion
A new study by Cornell researchers developed a first-of-its-kind model to control traffic and intersections in order to increase autonomous car capacity on urban streets of the future, reduce congestion and minimize accidents. (2019-12-16)
New study looks at motorized scooter injuries
More than half of people who received X-rays or CT scans after electric scooter accidents were found to have injuries, most commonly to the upper extremities, according to a new study. (2019-12-03)
Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic
A new material that stiffens 1,800-fold when exposed to heat could protect motorcyclists and racecar drivers during accidents. (2019-12-03)
Daylight Saving Time has long-term effects on health
The annual transition to and from daylight saving time (DST) has clinical implications that last longer than the days where clocks 'fall back' or 'spring forward.' (2019-11-04)
Public blame accidents on drivers more than their automated cars when both make mistakes
The public are more likely to blame accidents involving semi-autonomous cars on driver -- rather than machine -- error, a new study has found. (2019-10-28)
Researchers develop platform for scalable testing of autonomous vehicle safety
In the race to manufacture autonomous vehicles (AVs), safety is crucial yet sometimes overlooked as exemplified by recent headline-making accidents. (2019-10-25)
Study: Tradeoffs between commute time, safety
Urban commuters may be less likely to encounter automobile accidents if they are willing to increase trip time, researchers report. (2019-10-22)
Darn you, R2! When can we blame robots?
A recent study finds that people are likely to blame robots for workplace accidents, but only if they believe the robots are autonomous. (2019-10-17)
Tractor overturn prediction using a bouncing ball model could save the lives of farmers
Overturning tractors are the leading cause of death for farmers around the world. (2019-09-25)
Seeing is believing: Eye-tracking technology could help make driving safer
'Keep your eyes on the road.' With the recent advances in vehicle-assisted safety technology and in-car displays, this old adage has a new meaning, thanks to two new applications of eye-tracking technology developed by researchers at the University of Missouri. (2019-09-24)
Over one-fifth of injured US adult cyclists were not wearing a helmet -- new study
Men and ethnic minorities are less likely to wear cycle helmets and more likely to suffer from head and neck injuries in accidents, according to new research published in Brain Injury. (2019-09-13)
Groovy! These grooved patterns better mitigate shock waves
A team of engineers at UC San Diego has discovered a method that could make materials more resilient against massive shocks such as earthquakes or explosions. (2019-09-13)
Single traumatic brain injury can have long-term consequences for cognition
A single incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to long-lasting neurodegeneration, according to a study of 32 individuals. (2019-09-04)
Personal protective equipment most critical to safety of seafarers
A new article published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal investigates the causes of these injuries and accidents and finds that injury reduction campaigns focused on personal protective equipment (PPE) would be most effective at reducing risks to workers. (2019-08-26)
Psychology can help prevent deadly childhood accidents
Injuries have overtaken infectious disease as the leading cause of death for children worldwide, and psychologists have the research needed to help predict and prevent deadly childhood mishaps, according to a presentation at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. (2019-08-10)
Study: Sizzling Southwest summers can cause pavement burns in seconds
When temperatures in the Southwestern US climb to over 100 degrees, the pavement can get hot enough to cause second-degree burns in seconds. (2019-07-26)
Castor oil-based inhibitors to remove gas hydrate plugs in Arctic deposits
The castor-based waterborne polyurea/urethanes (CWPUUs) were synthesized on the basis of the waterborne technique. (2019-07-08)
Ridehailing services may be driving up traffic deaths
The arrival of ridehailing is associated with an increase of approximately 3 percent in the number of motor vehicle fatalities and fatal accidents, according to research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. (2019-07-08)
BioSA -- Bridging the gap with biodegradable metals
The University of Malta has teamed up with Mater Dei Hospital to address the shortcomings of current bone scaffolds on the market in a project entitled Biodegradable Iron for Orthopaedic Scaffold Applications -- BioSA. (2019-07-01)
UQ researcher carving a new path for skier safety
A spectacular stack on a ski slope in Canada has led to a University of Queensland researcher determining a simple modification that could improve skier safety on the snow. (2019-06-17)
Improving driver safety: A standardized look at distraction monitors
A group of scientists in USA has developed the first-ever standardized method of evaluating commercially available driver-monitoring systems. (2019-06-05)
Freshwater stingray venom varies according to sex and age
A study by the FAPESP-funded Research, Innovation and Dissemination Center shows that toxins produced by young female stingrays cause more pain, whereas toxins produced by adult stingrays cause tissue necrosis. (2019-06-05)
Heart disease deaths nearly halved in a decade -- but condition remains UK's biggest killer
A new analysis of global heart disease deaths has revealed the number of UK people dying from the condition halved between 2005 and 2015, with the death rate falling from 80 deaths per 100,000 to 46 per 100,000. (2019-06-04)
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